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Murray Campbell

(b Cleveland, OH, July 19, 1915; d Pittsburgh, PA, Feb 10, 2010). American scientist and acoustician. After studying physics at Case Institute of Technology (BS 1937), he carried out research in nuclear physics at the University of Illinois (PhD 1941). He then joined the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, remaining with the firm for the rest of his professional life; he retired in 1980 after a distinguished career culminating in six years as Director of Research and Development. In his youth he had become an accomplished flute player, and during his undergraduate studies at Case he encountered the notable acoustician Dayton C. Miller. This meeting led to a lifelong interest in the acoustics of the flute, and Coltman developed a laboratory at his home in which he conducted many important and illuminating experiments on flutes and flute playing. Particularly significant was his contribution to the understanding of the subtle interaction between the air jet blown across the flute embouchure hole by the player and the resonances of the air column within the flute pipe. Over four decades, starting in the mid-1960s, he published more than 40 papers on the acoustics of flutes and organ pipes. He was a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers....

Article

Michael Ellzey

(b East McKeesport, PA, Nov 8, 1948). American trumpeter and pedagogue. He attended San Diego State University (BA 1970, music education; MA, trumpet performance) and the University of California, San Diego (PhD 1980, music). He taught music at the State University of New York at Cortland from 1985 to 2012, and has served as instructor of trumpet at Colgate University in Hamilton, New York. He has also been a research consultant for the instrument museum in Schloss Kremsegg in Kremsmünster, Austria.

Considered one of the leading scholars and performers on the keyed bugle, he wrote the definitive volume on the instrument, The Keyed Bugle (Metuchen, NJ, 1993, 2/2004). His debut solo album, Music for Keyed Bugle, is the first full-length recording devoted to the keyed bugle. His Das Flügelhorn (Bergkirchen, Germany, 2004) was published in both English and German editions. His many other scholarly publications include contributions to the ...

Article

Mark E. Perry

(b San Juan, PR, March 26, 1854; d San Juan, PR, April 4, 1934). Puerto Rican composer, flutist, scholar, and conductor. His earliest achievements came as a flutist; he studied flute with Italian-born Rosario Aruti. Chiefly self-taught as a composer, he was influenced musically by his father, a cellist and double bass player, and Felipe Gutiérrez Espinosa, an established Puerto Rican composer of sacred music. In 1877 Dueño Colón received the gold medal from the Ateneo Puertorriqueño for the symphonic work La amistad (1877). In 1880 he formed a municipal band in Bayamón and shortly afterwards served as the flutist for the chapel of San Juan Cathedral. Awards for his compositions continued, including a silver medal at the Pan American Exposition, held in Buffalo in 1901, for Canciones escolares, a collection of original songs as well as arrangements for Puerto Rican school children. In addition to showing substantial interest in European masterworks, he embarked on the scholarly study of the Puerto Rican ...

Article

Sarah Adams Hoover

(b Flint, MI, March 28, 1933). American organologist, curator, and tuba player. He studied tuba with Roy Benson and William Graves at Graceland University (1951–53), performed under william donald Revelli at the University of Michigan (BM 1955), and worked with William Bell at Manhattan School of Music (MM 1959). He also studied musicology with Paul Revitt at the University of Missouri, Kansas City (DMA 1969), where his dissertation focused on the D.S. Pillsbury collection of American-made brass instruments in Dearborn, Michigan. From 1961 to 1969 he was principal tuba player with the Kansas City Philharmonic and has since performed regularly on tuba as well as historical instruments including the serpent, the ophicleide, the saxhorn, and musical glasses. He served as curator of musical instruments at the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village in Dearborn (1971–85), producing pioneering research and curating exhibitions of early 19th-century American woodwind and brass instruments, instrument makers, and performers. From ...

Article

Katy Romanou

(b Corfu, Greece, May 2, 1911; d Athens, Greece, Jan 17, 1970). Greek music historian, trumpeter, and teacher. He was taught music at an early age in Corfu’s Philharmonic Society. In 1928 he moved to Athens, and studied the trumpet at the Odeion Athinon (‘Athens Conservatory’). He then became a teacher of that instrument at the Ellinikon Odeion (‘Greek Conservatory’) in Athens, and joined the State Orchestra of Athens and the orchestra of the National Lyric Stage.

In 1958 he published his Neoelliniki mousiki: Symvoli eis tin istorian tis (‘Neo-Hellenic music: contribution to its history’). The book, detailed and richly documented, remains today the most comprehensive study on music in the Ionian Islands in the 19th century and early 20th (but not confined to that location). In 1999 Stelios Tzermpinos published an index of names in Neoelliniki mousiki, making it easier to use. However, the book is out of print and difficult to find. It is also difficult to access the ‘Motsenigeio istoriko archeio neoellinikis mousikis’ (‘Motsenigian historic archive of neo-Hellenic music’), the personal library and rich archive of sources collected by Motsenigos over 25 years, and donated by his wife, Litsa Papa, at his death, to the National Library of Athens. Among its resources are 1300 scores – some extremely rare – of works by 124 Greek composers of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th....

Article

William Kirk Bares

(Hopkins )

(b Sharon, CT, Nov 17, 1935). American trombonist, ethnomusicologist, and composer. A well regarded jazz soloist, he is perhaps best known as a musical collaborator with ecumenical tastes. Strongly influenced by New Orleans jazz at a young age and seasoned by work in traditional jazz bands as a student at Yale, he transitioned easily to the collective free improvisation scenes of 1960s and 70s New York. Early partners included Cecil Taylor, Archie Shepp, Steve Lacy, Sheila Jordan, Enrico Rava, Carla Bley, John Tchicai, and Milford Graves; he worked with the last two in the New York Art Quartet. The open spirit of his early work is preserved on Archie Shepp’s Four for Trane (1964, Imp.), to which he contributed adventurous arrangements, and his own eclectic Blown Bone (1976, Phillips), which features several of the above artists.

Rudd’s subsequent collaborations have extended his longtime interest in non-Western music. He has carried out research for Alan Lomax’s cantometrics project (from early 1980s) and taught ethnomusicology at Bard College (...

Article

Matthew Harp Allen

(b Madras [now Chennai], India, Aug 13, 1927; d Hartford, CT, Sept 10, 2002). flutist, vocalist, and ethnomusicologist of Indian birth. Born into a family of musicians and dancers, he received his musical training from his mother T. Jayammal and from flutist T.N. Swaminatha Pillai, an MA in economics from Annamalai University (1951), and a PhD in ethnomusicology from Wesleyan University (1975).

He first came to the United States as a Fulbright scholar at UCLA (1958–60), was reader and head of the department of Indian music at the University of Madras (1961–6), and returned to the United States, where he studied ethnomusicology at Wesleyan University (1967–1970), taught at the California Institute of the Arts (1970–5), and then worked in the faculty of Wesleyan University (1975–2002).

He was honored in India with the Kalaimamani Award by the government of Tamil Nadu (...