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Article

Dimitri Conomos

revised by George Leotsakos

(b Piraeus, May 19, 1929). Greek composer and musicologist. He graduated in theology from Athens University (1954), in neo-Byzantine music (1955) and harmony (1956) from the Piraeus League Conservatory, and in counterpoint, fugue and composition (1959) from the Hellenic Conservatory, where he studied with Yannis A. Papaïannou. At Brandeis University (1962–5) he studied composition (with Arthur Berger), Byzantine music palaeography and electronic music. In 1950 he revived the boys' choir of the Greek Royal Palace, which he directed until 1967. He also established and conducted the Athens Chamber Chorus (1958–61). Between 1961 and 1963 he taught Byzantine music at the Holy Cross Theological Academy, Boston, Massachusetts. In 1965 he established the first electronic music studio in Athens. He was a founder-member (1965) and later president (1975–85) of both the Hellenic Association for Contemporary Music and the Greek section of the ISCM. In ...

Article

John C.G. Waterhouse

[Ottavio Felice Gaspare Maria]

(b Montegiorgio, Ascoli Piceno, Nov 16, 1881; d Montegiorgio, Dec 28, 1928). Italian musicologist, conductor and composer. He studied the piano, organ and composition at the Liceo Musicale di S Cecilia, Rome, where he gained his diploma in 1906 and was from 1912 professor of aesthetics and music history. He also graduated in 1907 from Rome University with a thesis on the Italian oratorio, subsequently expanded into an important book. His scholarly writings – notably those on Italian laudi spirituali and on Carissimi – in general helped to lay the foundations of modern Italian musicology. As a conductor he specialized in choral music, and in 1926 he founded the Madrigalisti Romani. He also fought hard for the improvement of Italian music education. His most ambitious composition, the opera Mirra, is eclectic and uneven, but shows technical enterprise – not least in the brief use of a specially constructed ‘pentaphonic harmonium’, in which the octave was divided into five equal parts (cf Indonesian ...

Article

Saul Novack

(Ludwig)

(b Cologne, Nov 17, 1902; d Basle, Oct 19, 1996). American musicologist and pianist of German origin. After schooling in Cologne he was awarded a music teacher's diploma by the Austrian State Commission in 1930. He studied musicology at the University of Vienna (1933–8), and took the doctorate in 1938 with a dissertation on acoustical psychology. He also studied privately with Schenker. In 1940 he emigrated to the USA, later becoming an American citizen, and was active as a conductor, teacher, accompanist and répétiteur. He held teaching posts at the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music and Art (1947–53) and the University of California at Los Angeles (1953–6) before his appointment in 1956 as professor of music at the California State University at Los Angeles, where he taught until his retirement in 1970 as professor emeritus. He frequently served as accompanist to distinguished singers such as Elisabeth Schumann, Pinza and Fischer-Dieskau, and assisted Lotte Lehmann in her art-song courses. Albersheim was one of the first to write on the importance of the theories of Heinrich Schenker, whose influence is occasionally reflected in his writings. He wrote mainly on acoustics and the psychology of hearing, as well as its relationship to musical aesthetics....

Article

José López-Calo

(b Évora, Dec 27, 1917). Portuguese musicologist. He studied music at the Évora Seminary and in Rome at the Pontificio Istituto di Musica Sacra, where he obtained the licentiate in 1951. From 1940 he taught music and conducted the choir at the Évora Seminary; he also taught at the Centro de Estudios Gregorianos, Lisbon, where in 1966 he succeeded Mario Sampayo as conductor of the Polyphonia, a choir devoted to the interpretation of early music (particularly Portuguese). In 1974 he resigned from both posts. He was made canon of the Évora Cathedral Chapter, where he was active as mestre da capela, in 1957 and was granted the honorary doctorate by the University of Évora in 1988. He has contributed to the encyclopedia Verbo and to various national journals, and has taken part in many conferences, both national and international. His publications may be divided into three fields: transcriptions of Portuguese polyphonic music, catalogues of Portuguese musical archives, and diverse writings on the history of Portuguese music, particularly in the cathedrals. His transcriptions are always extremely accurate and faithful to the originals and, at the same time, practical for choral use. His catalogues, though seldom including musical incipits, are complete, detailed and clear, and form the greatest list of musical sources in Portugal....

Article

Achilleus Chaldaiakis

(b Herakleion, Crete, 1946). Greek musicologist and conductor. He studied Byzantine music at the Greek Conservatory and Theology at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, after which he received a scholarship from the Foundation of National Scholarships (IKY) and continued postgraduate studies in England. He served as professor of Byzantine chant and musicology at the University of Macedonia in Thessaloniki. His doctoral dissertation focused on Byzantine chant and was the first of its kind among Greek university dissertations. He has published several historical, theoretical, and hymnological papers, covering both Byzantine and post-Byzantine music, as well as material for a course on liturgical studies at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. He has served as academic supervisor for many university research programmes specializing in Byzantine music, and his research has resulted in the organization of special photographic and musical archives. He is conductor and founder of the Byzantine University Choir, established in ...

Article

Hans Heinrich Eggebrecht

(b Neuss, July 6, 1899; d Lüdenscheid, Sept 1, 1994). German musicologist and choir director. He studied musicology with Ludwig at Göttingen University (1919–21) and subsequently with Gurlitt at Freiburg University, where he received the doctorate in 1924 with a dissertation on the melodies Innsbruck, ich muss dich lassen and Ach Gott, vom Himmel sieh' darein. He was a lecturer at the Bauernhochschule in Rendsburg (1924–5) and at the Volkshochschule in Kassel (1925–6). He then acted as music consultant to the Central Office for General Librarianship in Leipzig (1926–8) and lectured in Protestant church music at the University of Münster (1930–39). After the war he lectured at the Landeskirchenmusikschulen of Hanover (1947–8) and the Rhineland (1949–57).

In the early 1920s Ameln embarked on a fruitful career as a choral and orchestral conductor and director of choral courses. His object was the authentic performance of old music, and this was coupled with considerable editorial work. He edited the journal of the Finkenstein League, ...

Article

Wayne D. Shirley

(Bunshaft)

(b Brookline, MA, Nov 28, 1943). American conductor, musicologist, and music librarian. Anderson attended Bryn Mawr (BA 1965), the University of Illinois (MM 1969), and the University of Maryland (MLS 1989). Anderson was a Music Librarian at the Library of Congress from 1978 to 1995 before resigning to pursue an independent career as a conductor, specializing in the conducting of music to accompany the showings of silent films. Her interest in this area began in the late 1970s while working on the score for Carl Dreyer’s The Passion of Joan of Arc. Her conducting is informed by scholarly work; whenever possible her performances use the music for its original release; lacking that, she compiles a score using material which might have been used during the film’s first showings. A good example of her work is the 1922 film Häxan (now on Criterion Collection DVD 134)....

Article

Rreze Kryeziu

(b Skopje, Macedonia, Sept 23, 1909; d Pristina, Kosovo, Oct 21, 1991). Albanian composer, music pedagogue, conductor, and ethnomusicologist. He learned music by analysing the works of other composers and by attending private lessons with professors in Belgrade. During his secondary education he learned to play the violin, the cello, and the piano. He arrived in Kosovo to pursue a career as a music pedagogue. He spent a decade in Prizren (1946–56), which was typified by intense musical activity and during which time he directed the choir SH.K.A. ‘Agimi’ (1944) and was a professor and director of the School of Music (1948). (See E. Berisha: Studime dhe vështrime për muzikën, Pristina, 2004, 209–14).

His familiarity with folk music is evidenced by his analyses of Albanian folk songs, which he summarized in a seven volume work called Albanian Folk Music. As a result of this work, he became known as the first ethnomusicologist specializing in Albanian folklore....

Article

(b London, Oct 6, 1912; d Farnham, Surrey, Feb 2, 1997). English musicologist, conductor and instrumentalist, brother of the double-bass player and composer Francis Baines. During his education at Westminster School (King’s Scholar, 1925–30), his musical talents became evident, encouraged by the school director of music, C. Thornton Lofthouse. In 1930 he went to Christ Church, Oxford, where he studied natural sciences and graduated with honours in chemistry in 1933. The award of an open scholarship to the RCM changed the direction of his career, and after two years’ study devoted mainly to the bassoon he joined the LPO as third bassoon and double bassoon in 1935. This appointment (interrupted by six years’ army service) continued until 1948 and led to his election as assistant conductor in 1949. The following year he became associate conductor to the International Ballet Company, but remained a regular conductor of the LPO Schools Concerts. Between ...

Article

Kyle Gann

(b Radekhov, Oct 21, 1938). American composer and conductor of Ukrainian birth. He studied at the Los Angeles Conservatory of Music and Art (BA 1960, MM 1962; later the California Institute of the Arts), where his teachers included Earle Voorhies and Morris Ruger; he also studied the piano with Rosina Lhevine and composition with Donald Erb and Mario Davidovsky. He joined the music department at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in 1970. He has also served as founder-conductor of the Nevada SO (1980–95), music director of the Las Vegas Opera Company (1983–8) and principal guest conductor and music advisor of the Kiev Camerata (from 1995). His scholarly work has established him as an authority on Soviet music.

Although Baley's music frequently refers to Ukrainian sources, his style became increasingly Americanized after 1980. The First Violin Concerto (1987) includes Ukrainian folk elements and exhibits a European polish and mood, but its unusual orchestral textures, rippling with celeste, vibraphone and harpsichord, seem American, as does the energetic drumming of the second movement ‘Dies irae’ and the muted jazz trumpet of the final ‘Agon’. His gradual move away from a mournful, Eastern European, somewhat neo-classical idiom climaxed in ...

Article

Melinda Berlász

(b Budapest, Oct 1, 1899; d Budapest, Nov 18, 1986). Hungarian composer, musicologist and conductor. Together with Kodály, he laid the foundations of 20th-century Hungarian choral music-making. He studied the violin and the viola as a boy. After a year (1918–19) at the technical university he entered the Budapest Academy of Music, where he studied composition with Siklós and then Kodály (1921–5). In 1925 he was engaged as choral conductor and music teacher in a secondary school and a teacher-training college; from 1928 to 1967 he was a professor at the academy, where he reformed the syllabus, emphasizing the training of choral conductors, the teaching of church music history and instruction in music theory and prosody. In 1931 he co-founded the publishing company Magyar Kórus, and served as editor of the music periodical of that name from then until 1950, when it was banned. From ...

Article

Lucy Durán

(b Geneva, Nov 27, 1906; d Geneva, Nov 2, 1986). Swiss musicologist and conductor. In Geneva he took an arts degree at the university and was a violin pupil of Fernand Closset at the conservatory. He then studied conducting with Nilius and music history with Adler in Vienna (1926–7), composition with Dukas and musicology with Pirro in Paris (1928–9) and conducting with Weingartner at Basle and Scherchen at Geneva; in 1936 he took the doctorat ès lettres at Geneva University.

After a visit to Greece (1929–31), where he studied sacred music and folksong, he returned to Geneva Conservatoire as orchestral instructor (1933–73) and conductor (1942–73), also serving as co-principal (1947), principal (1957) and honorary principal (1970). Concurrently at the university he was director of studies (1931), assistant professor (1942...

Article

Ned Quist

revised by Linda L. Giedl

[Schlossberg, Artur ]

(b Hamm, Germany, Sept 27, 1909; d Aurora, CO, May 28, 2002). Composer, musicologist, conductor, and pianist of German birth; naturalized American. Born Artur Schlossberg, he grew up in an orthodox Jewish family. After the Schlossbergs moved to Mannheim in 1919, he was introduced to German organ and choral literature by Arno Landmann, first Kantor (1911–43) of Christuskirche, and received piano instruction from Landmann’s wife. With Mannheim’s proximity to Strasbourg and Alsace-Lorraine, Schlossberg became fluent in French. Shortly after entering the University of Heidelberg in 1928, he applied for musicological studies with medievalist Heinrich Besseler. At the end of three years of intensive work, he submitted his doctoral dissertation (Die italienische Sonate für mehrere Instrumente im 17ten Jahrhundert, diss., U. of Heidelberg, 1932). Later that year he was engaged as a coach and conducting assistant to Hans Schmidt-Isserstedt at the Darmstadt Opera.

Beaten with guns by Adolf Hitler’s Stormtroopers in early ...

Article

Richard Wilson

(b Zürich, Dec 14, 1946). American conductor and music historian. He moved to New York with his family in 1949 and subsequently attended the University of Chicago and Harvard University, studying the violin with Roman Totenberg and conducting with Richard Wernick and Harold Farberman. In 1975 he was appointed president of Bard College, where he holds the Leon Levy Professorship of the Humanities. Named music director of the American SO in 1992, Botstein has restored the ensemble to prominence through thematic concerts, performances of rare repertory and innovative educational programmes. He became music director of the American Russian Youth Orchestra in 1995, and has appeared extensively as a guest conductor in Europe, Asia and South America. In 1990 he founded the Bard Music Festival, which has presented pairs of weekends focussing on Brahms, Mendelssohn, Richard Strauss, Schumann, Dvořák, Bartók, Ives, Haydn and Tchaikovsky, with accompanying volumes of essays devoted to each composer. Sceptical of inherited performing traditions, Botstein is most at home in late 19th-century repertory, but is also firmly committed to the music of living composers. His recordings include such 19th-century rarities as Bruch’s ...

Article

Keith Moore

(b Memphis, Jan 21, 1944). American composer, pianist, conductor and musicologist. He studied the piano with Roy McAllister at the University of Alabama (BM 1965), with Sophia Rosoff, and with Soulima Stravinsky at the University of Illinois (MM 1966), where he also studied composition with Ben Johnson (DMA, 1971) and had contact with Hamm, Hiller, Kessler and Brün. He served on the music faculty at Illinois (1968–74) before joining the staff at Wesleyan University. He was a member of the editorial committee of New World Records (1974–8), founding chairman of New England Sacred Harp Singing (1976) and has held visiting professorships at Middlebury College, Bucknell University and the University of Michigan. In 1980 he was Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Studies in American Music at Brooklyn College.

In 1968 Bruce founded the American Music Group (AMG), an ensemble innovative in its dedication to American music of all eras. AMG recorded the music of Anthony Philip Heinrich for Vanguard, toured widely in the United States and, under Bruce’s direction, gave the 20th-century première of Bristow’s ...

Article

Nicolae Gheorghiță

(b Talea, Prahova, Romania, Feb 6, 1930). Romanian musicologist, professor, composer, psaltēs, and choir conductor. He studied at the University Theological Institute (1953–7), the Ciprian Porumbescu Conservatory of Music in Bucharest (1957–63), and the Macedonian Conservatory in Thessaloniki (1983–5); and in 1982 he was awarded the doctorate by the Gheorghe Dima Academy of Music in Cluj.

After a period as a church singer, professor, and choir conductor at various monasteries, schools, and colleges in Bucharest and at the Neamț Monastery, Bucur-Barbu held the position of Professor of Byzantine Musical Palaeography and Byzantine Chant at the Ciprian Porumbescu Conservatory of Music in Bucharest (1970–3, 1990–2006) and has been a doctoral supervisor at the Conservatory since 1996. He is the founder and conductor of the Psalmodia choir of Byzantine music of the Bucharest National University of Music (starting in 1988).

Byzantine chant remains central to his wide-ranging scholarly and research interests. His extensive research remains the most systematic scholarly treatment of the history of Byzantine ecclesiastical music in Romania, his chief contribution being the critical edition of the ...

Article

Irina Boga

(b Ploieşti, Romania May 18, 1916; d Bucharest, Romania, July 23, 1998). Romanian conductor, composer, musicologist, and professor. He began his studies at the Bucharest Conservatory (orchestra conducting with Ionel Perlea 1933–40). He specialized in Salzburg (1941–2 with Klemens Krauss), and also graduated from the Philosophy Department of the Bucharest University (1933–6). He was conductor (1957–76) and director (1957–9) of the Romanian Opera in Bucharest, and conductor at the Alhambra Theatre, at the Company for Comic Opera, and at the Bucharest Philharmonic (1947–62). He was also conductor and director at the Romanian Opera in Cluj (1948–52), professor at the Department of Music History and Orchestral Conducting (1952–76) at the Bucharest Conservatory, the first conductor and director of the Cinematography Orchestra in Bucharest (1953–68), and director of music and advisor in the Ministry of Culture (...

Article

Maria Kostakeva

(b Plevnya, nr Drama, Jan 31, 1870; d Plovdiv, Jan 3, 1950). Bulgarian composer, conductor, pianist, and ethnomusicologist, one of the pioneers of professional music in Bulgaria. He received his musical education at the Prague Organ School, where he graduated in 1890. From 1894 he worked as a teacher in the King Alexander high school in Plovdiv. In 1896 he founded the Singing Society in Plovdiv, which he directed about 50 years. Between 1892 and 1898 he undertook folklore expeditions in Rodopi, Mittelforest, and Macedonia and recorded 2500 songs. In 1902 he became editor of the monthly Musicanthology. In 1921 he founded the first private music school, called Rodna pesen (‘Heimat song’), in Plovdiv and was its first director. He was among the first musicians to work professionally after Bulgaria's liberation from the Ottoman Empire in 1876. Like Dobri Khristov and other composers he collected previously unresearched folksongs from various regions of the country; 461 of these songs were published in the Bulgarian folklore anthology ...

Article

Patrick Warfield

(b Buffalo, NY, Dec 5, 1930). American musicologist, conductor, and educator. Camus attended Queens College, CUNY (BA 1952), Columbia University (MA 1956), and New York University (PhD 1969, with a dissertation on military music in the US Army prior to 1834). Joining the 42d Infantry (Rainbow) Division Band in 1945 (New York National Guard), Camus was commissioned as an army reserve bandmaster (warrant officer) in 1957, a position from which he retired in 1974. Following several years working in music publishing and teaching in New York public schools, Camus joined the faculty at Queensborough Community College, CUNY in 1969. He retired as emeritus in 1995. While at Queensborough, Camus founded and directed the Queens Symphonic Band (1970–96).

Camus has long been a vigorous advocate for the study of American music in general, and bands in particular. One of the founding members of the Sonneck Society for American Music in ...

Article

Howard Schott

(b Denver, June 28, 1906; d Uccle, Brussels, March 26, 1973). American conductor, musicologist and composer. After early piano and composition studies in Denver, he went to Belgium in 1925 to study composition with Moulaert and musicology with Van den Borren, whose daughter he later married. During the period 1928–32 he concentrated on composition, producing a piano trio, a string trio, piano solos and songs. In 1933, however, he gave up all other activity to devote his time to the authentic realization in performance of medieval and Renaissance music. He formed the Pro Musica Antiqua of Brussels, a performing ensemble of singers and instrumentalists specializing in 13th- to 16th-century music. Van den Borren served as the group’s musical adviser. As its conductor Cape toured throughout Europe and North and South America, and made many recordings for such distinguished series as L’Anthologie Sonore, directed by Curt Sachs, and the History of European Music in Sound. After World War II he resumed conducting the Pro Musica Antiqua both on concert tours and in recordings, including several of documentary historical interest. With the aid of the Belgian Ministry of Education he established a European Seminar on Early Music at Bruges. Cape set up a similar project in Lisbon at the Gulbenkian Foundation in ...