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Article

Patricia Brown

(Jeffrey)

(b Liverpool, Feb 17, 1950). Australian performer and composer, of English birth. After studying English at the University of New South Wales (1969–77) he worked as a solo and ensemble player on a wide range of medieval, Renaissance and Baroque string, wind and percussion instruments; he also specialized in folk instruments from a variety of countries. This instrumental ability led him to work with cross-cultural groups such as Sirocco, Southern Crossings (a world music quartet founded by Atherton in 1986), and Ariel (a quartet founded in 1995 to explore new music for shakuhachi, didjeridu, percussion and electronics); he has toured and lectured widely with these groups in Australia and abroad. He has also worked as a music therapist, and was curator of instruments at the Australian Museum in Sydney (1993 and 1998). In 1993 he was appointed foundation professor of music at the University of Western Sydney, Nepean. His interests include urban ethnomusicology, organology and Korean music. His work as a composer, arranger and improviser includes film scores, and choral and chamber works....

Article

J.M. Thomson

(b Lower Hutt, Aug 31, 1945). New Zealand composer, pianist, writer and teacher. She grew up in a musical family and began piano lessons at the age of seven. She graduated from the University of Otago, first in English and then in piano and composition (BMus 1968) and musicology (MA 1969). A New Zealand University Grants Committee scholarship took her to Victoria University in Wellington where she studied electronic music under Douglas Lilburn, gaining a diploma (1970). She subsequently studied in Berlin and Cologne (1971–5) with Aloys Kontarsky, Wilhelm Hecker, Karlheinz Stockhausen and Mauricio Kagel, being warded the Kranichstein Prize in new music (1974) and a Boswil Artistic Residency in Switzerland (1975). She married the singer Roger Wilson, returned to New Zealand as Mozart Fellow (1976–7), and after diverse experience in teaching, editing Canzona (journal of the Composers’ Association of New Zealand, whose President she was from ...

Article

Tony Gould

(b Sydney, Feb 8, 1947). Australian singer. She first studied piano. From 1968 to 1971 she sang with a cooperative group, the Affair, touring Australia and England, after which she joined the Daly–Wilson Big Band and worked as a studio musician and in cabaret. In 1973–4 she toured North America, where she appeared on television and performed with her ensemble Compared to What. Following her return to Australia she presented her own radio program, “Kerrie Biddell and Friends,” for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. During the 1970s she recorded three albums as a leader. In 1982 she formed a duo with the pianist Julian Lee and joined the faculty of the New South Wales Conservatorium in Sydney to teach jazz. She remained active through the 1990s. Biddell possesses a powerful voice with an uncommonly wide range and is a gifted improviser; she may be heard to particular advantage on the track ...

Article

Irene Weiss Peery

(b Sydney, June 29, 1886; d Philadelphia, June 20, 1948). Australian-American pianist, composer and teacher. He was first taught the piano by his mother and then, from 1901, by Sydney Moss. In the same year he made a concert tour of more than 280 towns and cities in Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand; further tours followed. From 1905 to 1910 he studied in Berlin with Busoni. During these years of intensive study he performed extensively throughout Europe and conducted orchestras in the UK. After he settled in the USA in 1910, such notable pianists as Mark Hambourg, Ernest Hutcheson and Backhaus continued to play his compositions in Europe. From 1910 until his death Boyle performed, taught and composed in America. He held positions at three major American conservatories: the Peabody Conservatory of Music in Baltimore, as head of the piano department (1910–22), the Curtis Institute (...

Article

J.M. Thomson

( b Christchurch, Sept 28, 1945). New Zealand composer and teacher . The second of six daughters, she grew up in an intensely musical environment. She graduated from the University of Canterbury in 1967. In 1973 she founded the influential Christchurch music workshops, and later formed and directed the Centre Sound choral group. She gained a teaching diploma in 1976 and the following year became the first ‘composer-in-schools’. Her work as a teacher has led to a ‘school’ of young Christchurch composers. She also plays a leading role as a lecturer, writer, adjudicator and musical director.

A prolific composer, she has been influenced above all by landscape. She has worked closely with painters and has set texts by leading New Zealand poets such as Ian Wedde and Ruth Gilbert as well as the writings of Janet Frame and Margaret Mahy. Of her Five Vignettes of Women, for flute and female chorus (...

Article

Graham Hair and Greta Mary Hair

(b Sydney, Jan 19, 1945). Australian composer, conductor and teacher. She studied English and French at the Australian National University (BA 1966) and music with Larry Sitsky at the Canberra School of Music; later she studied at the Kodály Institute in Hungary (Diploma of Music Education 1982). On her return to Canberra in 1983 she founded Gaudeamus, an institute for music teaching and performance for children, youth and adults. She has been particularly involved with composing and conducting vocal music – especially for children’s voices – and her output includes much choral and church music. She has also written many stage works for children, most of them to her own texts, and incidental music for several plays.

(selective list)

Article

George N. Heller

revised by Alice-Ann Darrow

(b St Joseph, MO, Oct 29, 1934). American music educator. He studied at the University of Kansas (BME 1955, MME 1956, PhD 1967) and at the University of Melbourne in Australia on a Fulbright Scholarship (1956–7). Between 1955 and 1963 he taught music in various Kansas public schools, and from 1965 to 1969 he was on the music faculty at Michigan State University, where he was director of the laboratory for studies in music psychology. In 1969 he returned to the University of Kansas to chair the Department of Music Education and Music Therapy. Since 2004 he has served in various upper administrative positions and as director of the Center for Research in Music Behavior. Duerksen has lectured widely in the USA and abroad on music education, music therapy, and the psychology of music. He has been active in various professional bodies, including the National Association for Music Therapy and the Music Educators National Conference, for which he served as editor of the ...

Article

Frederick Page

revised by J.M. Thomson

(b London, March 2, 1926). New Zealand choral conductor and teacher. Taken to New Zealand in 1928, he became a chorister at Christchurch Cathedral, and studied at the University of Canterbury. He was appointed conductor of the Royal Christchurch Musical Society in 1949 and director of music at Christ's College from 1952, quickly earning a first-class reputation. In 1956 he received a state bursary to study in London with Boult. On his return to New Zealand he resumed his choral conducting, and took the RCMS Choir to the 1962 Adelaide Festival, the first overseas visit to be made by a New Zealand choir. He has worked as chorus master with distinguished visiting conductors, including Sargent, Groves, Walton, Malko and Cavdarski, prepared the first performance outside Britain of Britten’s War Requiem, and conducted works by New Zealand composers including Jenny McLeod and David Farquhar. In 1970 the Queen Elizabeth II Arts Council awarded him a travelling fellowship and from ...

Article

J.M. Thomson

(Wynfreda)

(b Nelson, Feb 4, 1942). New Zealand composer and teacher. She graduated in English from the University of Canterbury (BA 1964) and taught for a number of years before taking the BMus first in music history (1982) and then in composition (1991) at Victoria University of Wellington. She has helped to develop the study of relationships between Polynesian and Western musical styles and has collaborated extensively with Maori performing artists. Her music is often expressively atonal or modal in style with frequent use of linear techniques and it displays her affinity with wind instruments. She has written many chamber and choral works but has specialized in music for dance and for performance in schools. Both Maori culture and the New Zealand environment are sources of inspiration for her.

Article

J.M. Thomson

(b Hastings, New Zealand, Oct 10, 1954). New Zealand composer and teacher. Her studies began in 1973 at the University of Canterbury, where she subsequently became computer music research assistant. In 1978 she attended summer schools in Europe with John Cage and Iannis Xenakis. After experience as a computer programmer, composer, broadcaster and music journalist she held teaching positions at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, and at the University of Auckland. She has published papers on computer music and produced radio programmes on new music; she has also written poetry. She sees music and theatre as one entity ‘functioning to transform the people within the society’ and ‘real art [as] a transformative thing’. As a composer Frykberg has specialized in electro-acoustic music theatre. Several of her works (e.g. The Garden, Woman and House) deal with feminist issues. Saxarba examines aspects of women’s spirituality, while Caroline Herschel is Minding the Heavens...

Article

Mark Gilbert

[Franco ]

(b Canberra, Australia, Dec 22, 1958). Australian electric guitarist. He taught himself rock and blues guitar from the age of seven, later drawing on the work of Frank Zappa, Chick Corea, the Brecker Brothers, and the pop group Steely Dan. After attending the Guitar Institute of Technology in Hollywood, California, in 1982–3, he taught on the faculty until 1987. He is best known internationally for his appearances with Corea’s Elektric Band (1986–93), but he also played with Jean-Luc Ponty (1986) and with Steve Smith’s group Vital Information (from the late 1980s). Beginning in 1986 he made several albums as leader, and from 1993 he toured with his own group and conducted master classes. In 1996 he was appointed head of the guitar department at the Los Angeles Music Academy. He took American citizenship in 1998. Most of Gambale’s work has been in a virtuoso jazz-rock context, and he achieved fame, and a certain notoriety, for developing the art of sweep-picking to a previously unknown level: this approach allows the execution of arpeggios and scale passages at extreme speed, but has been seen by some as putting technique before musicality. Gambale has been a regular contributor to ...

Article

Thérèse Radic

(Margaret)

(b Melbourne, Australia, Sept 5, 1935). Australian composer. Educated at Tintern Junior School and Melbourne Girls Grammar, she studied with the pianist Roy Shepherd and the composer Dorian Le Gallienne at the Faculty of Music, University of Melbourne, with the assistance of a Commonwealth Scholarship, graduating BMus in 1958. In that year her second work, Fantasy for flute and piano, had its first performance and broadcast, in the Netherlands. In 1964 her Phantasma for string orchestra was chosen by the Australian jury for submission to the ISCM Festival, Copenhagen. She won the Dorian Le Gallienne Award for composition in 1965, writing a string quartet performed at the 1966 Adelaide Festival as her first commission. Two large-scale orchestral works, Chimaera (1967) and Imperium (1969), were recorded by the ABC. The latter work was performed by the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra conducted by the composer Keith Humble in November that year. In ...

Article

Graham Hardie

(b Sydney, Nov 23, 1913; d Sydney, Dec 6, 1976). Australian composer and music educator. Self-taught as a composer, except for one year of study with Alex Burnard at the NSW State Conservatorium of Music (1947–8), Hanson's understanding of virtuoso pianism is evident in the powerful Piano Sonata and Preludes, while the most consistent seam of his creativity appears in the Tagore settings for solo voice and for chorus, ranging from 1935 (I dreamt that she sat by my head) to the magisterial oratorio The Immortal Touch, completed in 1976. A concert of his works in 1941, comprising songs and the sonatas for piano, flute and violin, drew praise from Cardus, who observed in his music an originality that avoided anglocentrism. As a lecturer at the Sydney Conservatorium, Hanson developed new approaches to the teaching of aural training and composition, and was active in curriculum development and the introduction of the BMEd. He became a mentor to many Australian musicians, including composers Nigel Butterley, Barry Conyngham, Richard Meale and Larry Sitsky, pianist Roger Woodward and jazz musicians Don Burrows and Frank Smith. He was honoured with the Award of Merit in ...

Article

Erika Schaller

(b Karlsruhe, Dec 13, 1938). German composer. From 1957 to 1960 he studied singing with Walter Neugebauer in Karlsruhe. In 1960 he went to Australia, where he studied the guitar with Antonio Losada (Sydney) and music theory with Don Andrews at the Sydney Conservatory (1966–70). He returned to Karlsruhe in 1971 to continue his guitar studies at the Staatliche Musikhochschule. He also studied composition with Eugen Werner Velte and became a member of Velte’s Gruppe für Kreative Musik. As a freelance composer Heyn has lectured at the Darmstadt Summer School (1984, 1986) and given concerts and lectures in Australia and Japan (1987). He was awarded fellowships by the Heinrich-Strobel-Stiftung of South-West German Radio, Baden-Baden in 1983 and 1995, and in 1988 received a Rolf Liebermann opera fellowship.

Heyn’s music is unconventional and uncompromisingly experimental. He concentrates on the sound-potential of traditional instruments, greatly extending their timbral capacities through unusual playing techniques. The degree of alienation from traditional acoustic timbres can be so extreme that listeners are convinced that they are hearing electronically generated sound or even the noise of machinery. Since the mid-1990s Heyn’s aesthetic goal has been to discover ‘poetry in noise’ by direct transformation of ambient sounds. His scores demand creative input from the players and sometimes employ graphic notation or words....

Article

John G. Doyle

(b Melbourne, July 20, 1871; d New York, Feb 9, 1951). American pianist of Australian birth. He studied with Vogrich in Australia, then entered the Leipzig Conservatory as a student of Reinecke and Jadassohn, graduating with the Mozart prize. After further study with Stavenhagen, he toured the Continent and England, and went to the USA (1900) as head of the piano department of the Peabody Conservatory (Baltimore). He resigned (1912) to resume his concert career, appearing in recitals, with major orchestras and in a notable series of radio broadcasts. His playing was unpretentious but characterized by technical proficiency and intellectuality. Some critics also noted a lack of warmth and emotion but he was considered among the finest pianists of his generation. A respected teacher and administrator, he joined the Juilliard School piano faculty at its inception (1924), becoming dean (1927) and later president (...

Article

J.M. Thomson

(b Wellington, Feb 6, 1945; d Sydney, July 30, 1995). New Zealand harpsichordist, organist, choral and orchestral director. A brilliant student, he took the BMus at Victoria University, Wellington, in 1968. Following postgraduate study in Brussels (1972), he was awarded the Kingdom of Belgium Pro Arte Gold Medal. In 1973 he took a postgraduate diploma at the GSM, London. During these years he was choirmaster at the Pro-Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, Brussels, and assistant organist at St Alban’s Cathedral, England. These laid the foundations for his appointment as director of music at the Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, Auckland (1974–85). Under his directorship the cathedral choir flourished and made several recordings. He held a senior lectureship at the University of Auckland from 1974 to 1991 and moved to the faculty of music at Newcastle University, Australia, in 1992. At the time of his death he had been appointed director of music at St James’s Church, Sydney....

Article

John Shand

(b Melbourne, Australia, July 28, 1958). Australian drummer, percussionist, teacher, bandleader, and composer. He began playing professionally at the age of 12 and made his recording début with Brian Brown in 1976. The following year he was a founder of the fusion band Pyramid, following the breakup of which, in 1983, he moved to Sydney. There he worked with Don Burrows and taught at the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music until 1993 (it became the Sydney Conservatorium of Music in 1990). He played with Lee Konitz in 1989 and worked with the pianist Mark Isaacs. In 1991 he formed AtmaSphere as a vehicle for his keen interest both in superimposed time signatures and in the meditative applications of music. It also provided an outlet for his cleverly conceived, virtuoso, and often comical solo playing. In 1995, with the pianist Kevin Hunt and Steve Hunter, he formed the trio Tree, and from ...

Article

Jere T. Humphreys

(b Melbourne, Australia, May 28, 1945). Music educator and scholar of Australian birth. She received degrees from the University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia (BAHons 1967, DipEd 1968), Andrews University, Michigan (MMus 1970), and the University of Calgary, Alberta (PhD 1976). She taught in public secondary schools in Australia (1968) and Canada (1968–9, 1971–6), and at Andrews University (1970–71), Notre Dame University in Nelson, British Columbia (1976–7), McGill University, Montreal (1977–86), and Indiana University (1986–). She was founding chair of the Philosophy Special Research Interest Group of the Music Educators National Conference (1988–94), and founding co-chair of the International Society for the Philosophy of Music Education (2003–5). She is editor of Philosophy of Music Education Review (from 1993) and The Philosopher, Teacher, Musician: Perspectives on Music Education (1993...

Article

J. Michele Edwards

[Anna] (Ferguson)

(b Christchurch, New Zealand, July 29, 1939). New Zealand composer. After attending Canterbury University, New Zealand (BMus 1961), she studied with Peter Racine Fricker at the RCM, London (1961–3); she also attended Darmstadt summer courses (1961–2) and worked with Koenig at the Staatliche Hochschule für Musik, Cologne, and at the Bilthoven electronic music studio (1963–4). In 1973 she went to the USA and taught at Hunter College, CUNY, and in 1982 joined the faculty at Vassar College, retiring in 2001.

While working in many genres, Lockwood consistently focusses on timbre and performance with spatial considerations. Her early works, including the Violin Concerto (1962), the chamber cantata A Abélard, Héloise (1963) and Aspekte einer Parabel (1964), are atonal. In the mid-1960s she moved away from both instrumental music and synthesized electronic materials to work with acoustic sounds from nature, attracted by their subtle complexity, rich variety and unpredictability. Her imaginative ...

Article

Elizabeth Wood

( fl 1874–86). Australian music teacher, organist and composer of British birth . He arrived in Sydney in 1874 to become organist of St James's Church, and was appointed local secretary of Trinity College of Music, London, establishing the first branch college of music in Sydney (1878); he also wrote various theoretical treatises for the use of Australian candidates and was examiner in music at Sydney University. Besides several minor published songs, piano and organ pieces, he composed a patriotic cantata Australia in 1880 for the Intercolonial Exhibition and choral music to accompany the first local performance of a classical play, the Agamemnon (Sydney University Great Hall, 1886). His three-act comic opera Populaire (T. Moser), which received several amateur performances in Sydney in 1886, was acclaimed more for its depiction of sporting prowess in a richly topical social setting than for its pedantic score. Some of his manuscripts are at the Fisher Library, University of Sydney. See also W.A. Orchard: ...