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(b Antwerp, c1554; d Antwerp, bur. Feb 27, 1604). Flemish lutenist, teacher and composer. He went to Rome to study in 1574, a visit that probably accounts for the Italian elements in his publications. He was a Protestant, but after the fall of Antwerp in ...

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Lini Hübsch-Pfleger

(b Nuremberg, c1560–70; d ?Erfurt, after 1601). German composer. In 1601, when he published a collection of motets, Agricola was teaching at the Gymnasium Augustinianum at Erfurt; he can scarcely be identified with the Christianus Johannes Agricola who was a discantist in the Kapelle at Weimar in ...

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Anna Maria Busse Berger

(b Schwiebus [now Świebodzin, Poland], c1486; d Magdeburg, June 10, 1556). German music theorist, teacher and composer. According to his own statements, he came from a peasant family and was largely self-taught in music. By 1520 he was in Magdeburg working as a music teacher. He became choirmaster of the Protestant Lateinschule in about ...

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(b Fabrica, nr Viterbo; d probably at Rome, ? in or before 1629) Italian composer and teacher. According to Casimiri he must have taught music at the Seminario Romano, Rome, some time between 1602 and 1606. The first post he held that is specifically documented is that of ...

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(b Tonnedorf, nr Erfurt; d Eisenberg, nr Gera, Jan 22, 1617). German writer on music, composer and schoolmaster. In 1579 he was teaching at the Lateinschule at Ronneburg, near Gera, and in 1591 he was Rektor of the Lateinschule at Gera. Later he was a preacher at Bernsdorf, near Torgau, at Munich and at Krossen, near Gera, and from ...

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Peter Le Huray and Bernarr Rainbow

(b Dublin, April 2, 1564; d Madrid, June 17, 1614). Irish teacher and writer. He was the son of Judge John Bathe. Anthony Wood wrote that he studied at Oxford and constructed a ‘harp of a new device’ which he presented in 1584...

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Iain Fenlon

(b Argenta, nr Ferrara, 1552; d ?Argenta, c1620). Italian composer and teacher. He received his early musical training from Luzzaschi and began his career as a singer at the Gonzaga court at Mantua; he later moved to Rome. His earliest datable compositions are four madrigals in a manuscript (...

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F.E. Kirby

(b Immecke, nr Meinerzhagen, 1536; d Dortmund, Aug 6, 1609). German theorist, teacher and Kantor. He was educated first in Münster and Dortmund, and later at Cologne University where he received the MA in 1560. After serving as teacher, Kantor and administrator for several years in various schools, mainly in Dortmund, he took up a post in ...

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(b ?Liegnitz [now Legnica], c1494; d after 1527). German theorist. The family residence in Liegnitz is documented from 1381, but the name is absent from the town records begun in 1546. Bogentantz attended the Gymnasium in Goldberg, and in 1508 he matriculated in the faculty of arts of Cologne University, where he may have been the pupil of Cochlaeus and fellow student of Glarean. In ...

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(b Namur, c1472; d Lier, May 20, 1522). South Netherlandish organist and music teacher. In 1488 he was a singer at the church of Our Lady, Antwerp, and in 1491–2 served as organist at Jacobskerk in that city. In 1493 he became organist in the chapel of the Confraternity of Our Lady at Our Lady's church. In ...

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Heinrich Hüschen

(b Waischenfeld, c1484). German music theorist and theologian. He attended the cathedral school in Bamberg and in 1500 entered Leipzig University where he became Bachelor of Arts in 1507, Master of Arts in 1511 and from 1513 until 1515 taught as Master of Law. In ...

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Adam Adrio and Clytus Gottwald

(b Gorsleben, nr Sachsenburg, Thuringia, Feb 21, 1556; d Leipzig, Nov 24, 1615). German music theorist, composer, teacher, chronologist and astronomer. He was one of the most influential German theorists of his time and prominent in the musical and intellectual life of Leipzig....

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Julia Sutton

(b probably Sermoneta, c1527–35; d after 1605). Italian dancing-master. He was the author of two large manuals of vital significance as sources of dance steps, types and music of the second half of the 16th century. Caroso's works include over 100 different dances by himself and others, as well as valuable rules for basic step vocabulary and etiquette. The ballettos, which form the major part of his repertory, clearly descend from the balli of 15th-century Italy, being similarly multi-partite and individually choreographed, with specially composed or adapted music. The fact that ...

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Peter Bergquist and Stephen Keyl

(b Wipfeld, Feb 1, 1459; d Vienna, Feb 4, 1508). German humanist and poet. Son of a vintner, he ran away from home in 1477 and studied at Cologne University for two years. After receiving the baccalaureate he travelled and studied further before matriculating in ...

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Donna G. Cardamone

Reviser James Haar

(b Monte San Giovanni Campano, nr Arpino, c1510; d after 1579). Italian composer, teacher, poet and theorist. He was active in Naples during the 1540s, though he seems never to have held a permanent post there. He was attached, perhaps informally, to the entourage of Giovanna d'Aragona: his madrigal volume of 1548 opens with dedicatory poems addressed to her and her sons Fabrizio and Marc'Antonio Colonna. He seems also to have had some connection with the short-lived Accademia dei Sereni (1546–8), composing a madrigal for a comedy staged there in 1548. At some point, perhaps in the 1550s, Cimello was in Rome in the service of Marc'Antonio Colonna. During that time he began a treatise on plainchant reform, and he had some dealings with Annibale Zoilo, to which he later alluded in a rambling letter to Cardinal Guglielmo Sirleto (in I-Rvat ). In the early 1570s he was in Benevento, teaching grammar and music at the local seminary and doing research on witchcraft in the area; he claimed to have written some collections of poetry (none are known to survive) including a poem called ...

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(b Wendelstein, Jan 10, 1479; d Breslau, Jan 10, 1552). German theologian, historian, humanist, music theorist and pedagogue. After studies with Heinrich Grieninger in Nuremberg, Cochlaeus entered the University of Cologne in 1504. A year later he had already gained the baccalaureate degree and in 1507 the MA. During these years his first treatise, Musica, was printed in three editions. He also became the music teacher of Heinrich Glarean, who, greatly admiring him, later included in his Dodecachordon three pedagogical compositions from his Musica. In 1510 on the recommendation of Willibald Pirckheimer, he became the rector of St Lorenz school in Nuremberg. There he organized a humanistically orientated curriculum and wrote the Tetrachordum musices (1511), his most valuable music treatise. In 1517 he earned a doctorate in theology at Ferrara and was ordained to the priesthood in Rome. In succeeding years he acquired a reputation as a fierce and unremitting opponent of Lutheranism and Calvinism. In an encounter with Luther at Worms in ...

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Ingrid Schubert

(b Finsterwalde, Lower Lusatia, 1546; d Frankfurt an der Oder, Oct 23, 1614 or Oct 25, 1615). German teacher and writer. He may have been related to Johannes Crüger. He is first heard of as Kantor at the Martinsschule, Brunswick. In October 1575...

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Frank Dobbins

(b ?Montricoux; d before Jan 9, 1571). French singer and music teacher active in Switzerland. Although he was proposed by Calvin as the successor to Guillaume de La Moeulle as choirmaster at Geneva Cathedral, the town council appointed Pierre Vallette in October 1556...

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(b Genoa, c1558; d Genoa, Aug 1593). Italian composer, uncle and teacher of Simone Molinaro. Sometime between 1568 and 1576 he was a pupil of Philippe de Monte at the court of Maximilian II in Vienna, where he perhaps worked as chamber musician. Dalla Gostena returned to Genoa before ...

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Walter Blankenburg

(fl early 17th century). German music teacher, active in Austria. He referred to himself as ‘Vinariâ Tyrigeta’; it may be assumed, therefore, that he originated from (or near) Weimar in Thuringia. Apparently he studied in Regensburg, since in his theoretical work he mentioned his teacher, Andreas Raselius, who was working there. In the first years of the 17th century he was in Eferding, near Linz, the territory of the Count of Starhemberg in what was at that time Protestant Upper Austria. In ...