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Jean-Michel Nectoux

(Urbain)

(b Pamiers, Ariège, May 12, 1845; d Paris, Nov 4, 1924). French composer, teacher, pianist and organist. The most advanced composer of his generation in France, he developed a personal style that had considerable influence on many early 20th-century composers. His harmonic and melodic innovations also affected the teaching of harmony for later generations.

He was the youngest of six children (one a daughter), born to Toussaint-Honoré Fauré (1810–85) and Marie-Antoinette-Hélène Lalène-Laprade (1809–87), a member of the minor aristocracy. Gabriel was sent to a foster-nurse in the village of Verniolle for four years. In 1849 his father was appointed director of the Ecole Normale at Montgauzy, near Foix; Fauré later recalled that from his early childhood he spent hours playing the harmonium in the chapel adjoining the school. An old blind lady, who came to listen and give advice, told his father about his gift for music; a certain Bernard Delgay shares the honour of having been his first music teacher. During the summer of ...

Article

William Brooks and Christopher E. Mehrens

(b Buckland, MA, 14 March 1826; d Dorchester, MA, 14 April 1888). American composer and music educator. He learned music in singing-schools and assemblies conducted by Lowell Mason, George James Webb, and others. He taught briefly in Massachusetts before moving to Hudson, New York, to teach in public schools and at the Claverack Seminary. By 1855 he was in Albany, where he taught at the Female Academy and was music director at the Pearl Street Baptist Church. In 1865 he moved to New York and worked for Firth, Son & Co. and for Biglow & Main, both publishers of music. Around 1880 he became associated with the Cincinnati publishing firm John Church & Co. In 1884 he was appointed director of choral music at the New England Conservatory in Boston.

Sherwin was deeply involved in the Sunday school movement and published several collections of music for children. He was also very active in ...

Article

William McClellan and Karen M. Bryan

(b Haskell County, TX, 2 Sept 1919; d New York, NY, 19 May 2000). American music educator and composer. He attended Baylor University (BM 1940) and the Eastman School of Music (MM 1941, PhD 1952). Waldrop taught at Baylor University (1946–51), where he conducted the Waco-Baylor University Symphony Orchestra. He joined the Juilliard School in 1960, serving first as assistant to the president and then as dean. He was president of the Manhattan School of Music from 1986 to 1989.

In the 1950s Waldrop served as editor of the Review of Recorded Music (1952–3) and the Musical Courier (1953–8). He also served as consultant for the humanities division of the Ford Foundation (1958–61). He consulted on music education with the governments of Germany, Portugal, and Israel and with the Albeniz Foundation in Madrid.

Waldrop composed a symphony (...