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David L. Crouse

revised by David W. Music

(b Tennessee, Oct 13, 1792; d Franklin, TN, Oct 18, 1859). American singing-school teacher and tunebook compiler. Nothing is known of his early activities or training, but by 1817 Carden was an established singing-school teacher in the Tennessee area. He taught a singing school in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1820, but probably returned to Tennessee shortly thereafter. In September 1822, Carden advertised a singing school in Nashville; he apparently continued to live in the Nashville area until 1850, when he moved to Williamson County (probably Franklin). His first tunebook, The Missouri Harmony, “published by the compiler” in St. Louis but printed in Cincinnati (1820, 2/1850/R 1975, 1994; modern revision, 2005), was the most popular fasola shape-note tunebook of the South and West until the Civil War, achieving at least 24 editions and reprints through 1857; however, Carden seems to have given up his interest in the book after the first edition, and subsequent issues were apparently the work of the Cincinnati printers. Carden procured shape-note music type and published two more tunebooks himself: ...

Article

Victor H. Mattfeld

(b Eisfeld an der Werre, Suhl, 1488; d Wittenberg, Aug 6, 1548). German publisher. Working in Wittenberg, removed from the main centres of music publication, he became one of the most important music publishers, particularly for the Reformation church. He studied at the University of Wittenberg (1512–14), and then worked for four years in the publishing house of Johann Rhau-Grunenberg (presumably his uncle). In 1518 he left Wittenberg to become Kantor of the Thomasschule and Thomaskirche in Leipzig, a position he held until at least 1 May 1520. On 18 September 1518 he also joined the faculty of the University of Leipzig, lecturing in music theory.

Rhau may have been associated with the circle of theologians surrounding Luther in Wittenberg; as a resident of that city at the time of the nailing of the 95 theses, he was certainly aware of Luther’s position. In June 1519...

Article

(b Munich, c1500; d Augsburg, ?1562/3). German Reform leader, teacher and music editor. Originally a Franciscan friar in Munich, Salminger left the order under the influence of the Reformation, married Anna Hallerin and in 1526 moved to Augsburg. There, both he and his wife joined the Anabaptist movement and were baptized by Hans Hutt in March 1527. Soon afterwards Salminger was chosen by lot to lead the Augsburg group. Imprisoned in September 1527 for his religious beliefs, he remained in gaol throughout the following years of persecution; finally he renounced his ties with the Anabaptist sect in a public confession dated 17 December 1530. After his release he was ordered to leave the city in March 1531, but he petitioned to remain because of ill-health and penury. His activities during the next few years are not known, but by 1537 he had apparently achieved full reinstatement in Augsburg, where he was allowed to teach and even enjoyed the patronage of the powerful ...