1-20 of 38 results  for:

  • Music Business, Institutions and Organizations x
  • Early 18th c./Late Baroque (1700-1750) x
Clear all

Article

Michael F. Robinson

revised by Francesca Seller

(fl 1739–40). Italian composer. In the document recording his appointment as maestro di cappella of the Ospedale della Pietà, Venice, in 1739 he is called ‘Alessandro Gennaro Napolitano’, which indicates that he was born or educated or both in the Neapolitan region. Fétis stated that he was born in Naples in 1717, but no confirmation of this is known. He was in service at the Pietà from 21 August 1739 to 13 May 1740 when he was dismissed for lack of diligence. Within that period he was not entirely idle, however, for he presented his opera Ottone at the Theatro S Giovanni Grisostomo, Venice, during Carnival 1740 and his serenata Il coro delle muse at the Ospedale on 21 March of the same year, performed by the pupils themselves. Both compositions were in honour of the Electoral Prince of Saxony, Friedrich Christian. Goldoni, who wrote the words of the serenata, said in his memoirs (...

Article

Daniel Heartz

(b Venice, Dec 11, 1712; d Pisa, May 3, 1764). Italian writer on opera, poet and savant. He was well educated at Rome and Bologna, whence he was welcomed into the learned circles of London and Paris, where he shared accommodation with Voltaire. In 1740 Frederick the Great took him into his personal service and gave him the title of count. From 1742 to 1747 he was also adviser to Augustus III, Elector of Saxony and King of Poland. At both Berlin and Dresden he was actively engaged in operatic productions, arranging and versifying Italian librettos to the taste of his patrons. He returned to Italy in 1753 because of ill-health. His Saggio sopra l'opera in musica was written the following year and first published in 1755. It attacks the unruliness prevalent in Italian public theatres, which compared unfavourably with the well-regulated and varied spectacles beginning to emerge at the court theatres of northern Europe. Other contemporary essayists such as Blainville, John Brown, Calzabigi, Krause, Ortes and Durazzo said much the same thing in condemning the dominance of the singers over every other aspect of serious opera in Italy....

Article

(b Brescia, June 19, 1666; d Brescia, 29 or March 30, 1733). Italian composer and organist. He began musical studies at an early age with Orazio Polaroli (organist of Brescia Cathedral) and spent a short time (c1681–3) serving at the court of the Polish king when Polaroli was its maestro di cappella. After his return to Brescia, Alghisi entered the order of S Filippo Neri without, however, ceasing to compose secular music. From at least 1690 he was maestro di cappella of S Maria della Pace, their church, and in that year he applied, without success, for the position of organist of Brescia Cathedral. A libretto of 1692 refers to him as maestro di cappella of the Brescian Collegio dei Nobili and the title-page to his Sonate da camera describes him as a member of the Accademia Filarmonica of Bologna. In the libretto for his oratorio ...

Article

René Pierre

Wind instrument makers of Strasbourg. [Life data refer to Strasbourg unless noted.] Jean (Johannes) II Keller (1710–78) was admitted as a turner in the corporation of carpenters in 1736. His three sons were woodwind makers. Jean III Keller (b 14 Dec 1737; d 1785), his first son, was described as ‘Instrumentenmacher’ at his marriage in 1765 and upon the births of his four children. He used the mark ‘[fleur de lis] / KELLER / A STRASBOURG’. Isaac Keller (b 26 Jan 1740; d 11 June 1802), the second son, was received into the corporation of carpenters in 1785, at the death of his brother Jean III. He joined the third son, Jean Philippe Keller (b 10 Nov 1743; d 1 July 1794) by 1790 to create a new partnership, marking their instruments ‘[angel trumpeter] / LES / FRERES/ KELLER’. Etienne Ozi (...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?London, late 17th century; d London, Oct 1728). English music printer and publisher. As early as 1715 he was active in London as a general printer whose production included ballads, chapbooks, labels and shopkeepers’ signs. He soon turned to music printing and issued some of the best engraved music of his period. A considerable innovator, he experimented with new methods of printing both from engraved plates and from music types. Beginning with the printing of the Suites de pièces pour le clavecin in 1720, Cluer had business relations with Handel, publishing in score nine of his operas, the first being Giulio Cesare in 1724, which was issued in the unusual format of a large pocket-size volume. Both this and the later operas are remarkable for their finely engraved title-pages and frontispieces. Other notable publications include the two volumes of A Pocket Companion for Gentlemen and Ladies (...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(fl London, 1740–60). English engraver. Several engravers of this name flourished in England during the 18th century, though probably only one worked at music. His first work appears in Walsh's publication of J.F. Lampe's Songs and Duetto's in … The Dragon of Wantley (1738) and music from the same composer's Margery (1740). His most important work was for the British Melody, or The Musical Magazine, published in 15 (probably fortnightly) instalments from February 1738. It reappeared as a set, published by Cole, in 1739. This was the first of the many rivals and successors to Bickham's The Musical Entertainer. Cole's work is of a very high standard, though less flexible and imaginative than Bickham's; the latter twice referred disparagingly to Cole in his second volume. As was customary, Cole continued to reissue separate plates for several years. He also engraved the music plates for ...

Article

William C. Smith

revised by Peter Ward Jones

(b ?London, 1695–1705; d ?London, after1742). English music seller and publisher, father of organist and composer Benjamin Cooke. He was active in London from 1726 to 1743, and published a considerable number of vocal and instrumental works, some of them obviously pirated from other publishers, others under licence as authoritative first editions. His publications were mostly in a heavy bold style, but some were engraved in a lighter style by Thomas Cross. After Cooke’s death or retirement some of his plates were acquired by John Johnson (ii), who reissued copies from them. Cooke’s publications include Roseingrave’s XII Solos for a German Flute (1730), Handel’s Sonatas op.2 (c1733) and 42 ‘suites’ by Domenico Scarlatti in two volumes (1739). His most interesting publication, however, was that of the five books of sonatas and the 12 concertos of Corelli issued in 1732. Not only do these constitute a collected edition of the composer’s works, but all, including the concertos, were published in score expressly for study purposes, an extraordinary form of publication for instrumental music at that time. Cooke’s plates were used well into the 19th century for reissues of these works....

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?London, ?1660–65; d ?London, ?1732–5). English music engraver, printer, publisher and music seller. He was probably the son of the 17th-century engraver Thomas Cross, who engraved some frontispieces and portraits for John Playford’s publications, including the portrait of the composer John Gamble (Ayres and Dialogues, 1656), and who may have engraved some music. From 1683 to about 1710 the younger Cross often signed himself ‘Tho. Cross junior sculpt.’, as on his first known work, Purcell’s Sonnata’s of III. Parts (1683), printed for the composer. From about 1692 to about 1720 he kept a music shop in London. He was the first to issue songs in single sheet format rather than in collections, and from the 1690s a considerable number of these appeared under his imprint. At first they were engraved on copper plates, which was an expensive method considering the ephemeral nature of the sheet songs, but he later used a cheaper material, probably pewter. He had a virtual monopoly of the music engraving trade until Walsh established his business in ...

Article

Anne Schnoebelen

(d Oct 6, 1749). Italian music publisher and bookseller. His firm was active in Bologna for most of the 18th century and was famous in the art of typography and for the accuracy and elegance of its editions. In 1720, as head of a society of Bolognese printers, Della Volpe acquired the printing establishment of the widow of Giulio Borsaghi. His first musical publication was an enlarged edition (1720) of Angelo Bertalotti’s Regole utilissime per … il canto fermo. He issued a further enlarged edition in 1744 (reprinted 1756, 1764 and 1778). He ordered musical type characters from the Netherlands and in 1734 began his music printing activities in earnest, starting with Giovanni Battista Martini’s op.1, Litaniae atque antiphonae finales B. Virginis Mariae. Della Volpe was also active as a bookseller, handling the musical publications of the Bolognese printers P.M. Monti and G.A. Silvani. In ...

Article

William C. Smith

revised by Peter Ward Jones

(fl c1736–40). French music engraver and printer, active in England. Though his musical activities in London were apparently short-lived (according to Hawkins he was also a watchmaker), he is renowned for the excellence of his engraving, particularly in his superb edition of Domenico Scarlatti’s Essercizi per gravicembalo (1739), with notes and staves of a larger size than usual (see illustration). Other fine engravings by Fortier include Porpora’s Sinfonie da camera … opra II (1736), De Fesch’s XII sonate, VI per il violino e basso per l’organo … e VI a duoi violoncelli … opera ottava (1736), a song by Farinelli, Ossequioso ringraziamento (c1737), Giuseppe Sammartini’s VI concerti grossi … opra II (1738) and Guerini’s Sonate a violino con viola da gamba ó cembalo (c1740).

HawkinsH Humphries-SmithMP R. Kirkpatrick: Domenico Scarlatti (Princeton, 1953, 4/1983)...

Article

Frank Dobbins

(fl Paris, 1690–1719/20). French music dealer and publisher. It is not known whether he was related to earlier publishers with the same family name, none of whom was apparently involved in music printing. Like other 18th-century music dealers, Henri Foucault was associated with the corporation of haberdashers and jewellers rather than that of the booksellers. He was originally a paper seller, with a shop ‘A la règle d’or’, rue St Honoré, but seems to have branched out from this trade by 28 June 1690, when a condemnation issued by the Conseil d’Etat accused him – in association with the engraver Henri de Baussen – of contravening Christophe Ballard’s royal privilege by publishing ‘divers airs de musique’. Two years later Foucault’s name appears on the title-page of Marais’s Pièces en trio pour les flûtes, violons et dessus de viole, in association with Hurel, Bonneüil and the composer, but he is still designated simply as ‘marchand papetier’. However by ...

Article

H. Edmund Poole

revised by Stanley Boorman

[le jeune]

(b Paris, Sept 15, 1712; d Paris, Oct 8, 1768). French typographer. The son of a typefounder, he was cutting punches and casting type by 1736, and in 1739 was registered in this craft with the printing section of the Chambre Syndicale of Paris. He issued his first specimen book, Modèles des caractères de l’imprimerie, in 1742. It was a tremendous achievement, showing (among other material) 4600 letters that he had cut in a wide range of styles with their sizes correlated in a logical and mathematical way. This system, quite new in typefounding, he had evolved in 1737, and he showed it in his Modèles as ‘Table des proportions des differens caractères de l’imprimerie’.

Fournier’s power of analysis and prodigious technical skill were clearly demonstrated in the six types that he devised for the printing of music. Two were for plainchant, one was for ‘Hugenot music’. Three were for songs and instrumental music. The first of this group was designed for double impression, with the staff lines printed first and the notes and other signs overprinted in a second pass through the press (...

Article

Anne Beetem Acker

Craft guild embracing harpsichord builders in some European cities, especially in the Low Countries. It was named after St Luke, the patron of painters, and like other guilds was originally a religious organization which evolved into a regulatory and protective association. In Antwerp, the Sint Lucasgilde can be traced back to 1382 and kept records until its closure in 1773. Besides harpsichord builders, its members included painters, gilders, carvers, printers, cabinet makers, and certain other specialists, as well as persons engaged in some seemingly unrelated trades. Notably, women were allowed in the Antwerp guild, but this was uncommon elsewhere. The guild protected its members against outside competition, set standards for workmanship, and regulated training and prices, among other functions. A surviving contract shows that Goosen Karest, although already a journeyman painter for eight years, entered a three-year apprenticeship with his brother, the harpsichord maker Joes Karest, in 1537. Goosen was required to work only for Joes, to provide for his own living, to work 11 to 14 hours per day, by candlelight if necessary, with a 90-minute midday break, and to make up any lost time at the end of the three years, in return for a small daily wage but not room and board....

Article

Theodor Wohnhaas

(b 1711; d Nuremberg, Oct 22, 1767). German music publisher. He founded a music publishing house in Nuremberg about 1742 with the copper-engraver Johann Wilhelm Winter (1717–60), and managed the business on his own from 1745; he was the leading Nuremberg music publisher of the mid-18th century. The firm specialized in the piano and chamber music of German (central and southern) and Italian composers, including C.P.E. Bach and Domenico Scarlatti. During his 25 years as a publisher Haffner issued about 150 works, all first editions; almost all were engraved by the outstanding Nuremberg engraver Johann Wilhelm Stör (1705–65). The Nuremberg art dealer Adam Wolfgang Winterschmidt took charge of the publishing house in 1770, and was succeeded by his son in 1786.

NDB (L. Hoffmann-Erbrecht) L. Hoffmann-Erbrecht: ‘Der Nürnberger Musikverleger Johann Ulrich Haffner’, AcM, 26 (1954), 114–26; xxvii (1955), 141–2, xxxiv (1962), 194...

Article

Hare  

William C. Smith

revised by Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

English family of music publishers and violin makers. The business was founded by John Hare (d London, bur. 9 Sept 1725), who by July 1695 was established in London as a publisher. In August that year he acquired additional premises in London which he probably took over from John Clarke (the 11th edition of Youth’s Delight on the Flageolet, earlier editions of which had been issued by Clarke, was one of Hare’s first publications). He gave up these two premises for new ones in April 1706 and remained in business alone until December 1721. His son Joseph Hare (d London, bur. 17 July 1733) joined him in January 1722, and they published jointly until John’s death in September 1725. Joseph then carried on the business in his name, probably on behalf of his mother Elizabeth Hare (‘the elder’) (d Islington, London, bur. 8 July 1741...

Article

Article

Frank Kidson, William C. Smith and D. Ross Harvey

(b ?London, c1657; d London, bur. Nov 18, 1732). English printer and manufacturer of printing ink. He set up as a Master about 1683, and was active until about 1715. With Thomas Moore and Francis Clark he printed Vinculum societatis (1687), the first musical work with the ‘new tied note’ (i.e. quavers and semiquavers united in groups). Before then, except in engraved music, such notes were printed separately because of the difficulty of connecting, in movable types, notes of different pitch. The ‘new tied note’ was improved (as the ‘new London character’) by William Pearson, who was in business from 1699 to 1735, and who was the best known of Heptinstall’s 12 apprentices. A feature of both new types was the printing of round-headed notes instead of the former lozenge shape (for illustration see Printing and publishing of music, fig.). He issued a number of works by Purcell, including ...

Article

Anik Devriès

(b Sézanne en Brie, Oct 20, 1697; d Paris, Oct 20, 1774). French music publisher and violinist, younger brother of Jean-Pantaléon Le Clerc. The brothers have often been confused owing to the similarity of their activities and the infrequent use of Jean-Pantaléon’s first name. Charles-Nicolas Le Clerc’s name appears for the first time in the list of violinists of the Académie Royale de Musique in 1729 and in that of the 24 Violons du Roi in 1732. He held the former post until 22 May 1750 and the latter until 1761. His talents as a violinist were frequently mentioned during that period in accounts of concerts published in the Mercure de France.

Le Clerc began publishing music in 1736 and remained in the business until his death; the first privileges registered in his name date from 9 March 1736 and 17 November 1738; his first catalogue (1738...

Article

Anik Devriès

(b ?Sézanne en Brie, before 1697; d after 1759). French publisher and violinist, the elder brother of Charles-Nicolas Le Clerc. He lived at the ‘Croix d’Or’, rue du Roule, Paris, from 1728 to 1758. Having entered the 24 Violons du Roi on 17 July 1720, he remained a member until 1760. A periodical advertisement dated October 1728 announced the start of his career as a music commission agent. Up to 1753 his name was often associated with that of Boivin, both on the title-pages of works and in music advertisements. There seems to have been a tacit agreement between the two dealers; they shared the Parisian music market and the same works are listed in their respective catalogues. Their trade was supplied by the composers themselves, mainly by those having had their works engraved at their own expense. They also represented French and foreign publishers such as Ballard, Charles-Nicolas Le Clerc and Michel-Charles Le Cène....

Article

Meares  

Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

[Mears, Meers]

Two English instrument makers, music publishers and sellers, father (d ?London, ?1722) and son (b London, ?1671; d London, ?1743). They were active in London from the 1660s to 1743. Richard Meares the elder was possibly the leading maker of viols of his time; he also made lutes and other string instruments. His instruments are usually distinguished by their tasteful purfling and woodwork, and high-quality varnish. He may have been the teacher of Edward Pamphilon, Barak Norman and Nathaniel Cross. Instruments can be seen at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London (bass viol, c1677), the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City (bass viol, c1682), and the Dolmetsch Family Collection, Haslemere (alto viol, c1668). Richard Meares the younger is credited with few instruments, and these tend to be of the violin family, then newly fashionable in society.

The firm sold music, and advertised it from at least ...