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French institution. Created as the Petite Académie in 1623, the organization that was to become the Académie des Inscriptions et Belles-Lettres was initially dedicated to the glory of the king and to the history of his reign. Its scope was enlarged in 1703 by Gros de Boze, who called for the study of all aspects of civilization, from its origins to the 18th century. Discussions of music seem to have taken place from the end of the 17th century under the aegis of Charles Perrault, although documentation of such discussions dates only from 1706. The study of ancient music was begun under Galland and Fraguier and continued under Burette. The music of the ancients constituted the favourite subject of the academicians throughout the first half of the 18th century, and was revived by Michel de Chabanon and J.B. Rochefort between 1770 and 1780. A prize was established by Durey de Noinville in ...

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German musical organization. Established in 1861 in Weimar and dedicated to the promotion of new music (primarily through performance), the Allgemeiner Deutscher Musikverein (ADMV) was the first national music society in Germany. Focal points of its activity were the annual festivals that took place in alternating German and German-speaking cities and initially featured the music of Liszt and his colleagues in the ‘New German’ movement. During its first decade the ADMV gave premières of music by such composers as Wagner, Liszt, Cornelius and Felix Draeseke. Liszt provided the society with artistic leadership but, as president, Franz Brendel was the chief guiding spirit during its early years. Upon Brendel’s death in 1868 the noted Leipzig choral conductor Carl Riedel took over the presidency. During Riedel’s leadership the society entered into a period of identity crisis that was exacerbated by the deaths of Wagner and Liszt: it gradually broadened its mandate to encompass the promotion of music by non-Germans (Saint-Säens, Dvořák, Tchaikovsky) and by the former conservative opposition (Brahms). These developments intensified under the leadership of Riedel’s successors, Hans von Bronsart von Schellendorf (...

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Austrian, German and American organizations. After World War I numerous Bruckner societies were established in Austria and Germany; the one founded in Leipzig in 1925 became the International Bruckner Society (Ger. Internationale Bruckner-Gesellschaft), based in Vienna, in 1929. It published the periodical Bruckner-Blätter until 1940 and collaborated with the Österreichische Nationalbibliothek in publishing the earlier volumes of Robert Haas's complete Bruckner edition. Nationalist propaganda among the German-speaking parts of the society led to its decline and in 1939 it became simply the Deutsche Bruckner-Gesellschaft, ceasing its activity soon afterwards. A second international society, again based in Vienna, published Mitteilungsblatt der Internationalen Bruckner-Gesellschaft from 1971. The Bruckner Society of America was founded in 1931 to ‘develop in the public an appreciation of Bruckner, Mahler, and the other moderns’; it publishes the periodical Chord and Discord (1932–41, 1947–) and has awarded medals to Koussevitzky, Toscanini and other outstanding conductors of Bruckner....

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The music department is a part of the Research Institute of the Arts, which also includes Fine Art Studies, Theatre Studies, Screen Arts Studies (after 1988), and Architectural Studies (since 2010). The music department existed independently until 1988 as an Institute of Music. The Institute of Music was established in 1948 as the Research Institute of Music with the Museum at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences with two staff members: Petko Staynov (director) and Andrey Stoyanov. The task of the Institute of Music is to collect, preserve, and publish the Bulgarian folksong heritage. Subsequently the collectors and researchers of folk songs and traditions Ivan Kachulev, Andrey Andreev (1950), Rayna Katsarova, and Elena Stoin (1951) were appointed at the Institute. A separate section for folk music was established at the Institute, led by Rayna Katsarova (1952–67) and, since 1967, Prof. Kaufmann. In 1952 the first volume of the first research journal of the Institute, ...

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Organization established in Dunfermline in 1913 for ‘the improvement of the well-being of the masses of the people of Great Britain and Ireland’. The trust's first undertaking was the completion of a scheme, begun by Andrew Carnegie, for the installation of organs in over 3800 churches and chapels. Between 1916 and 1929 it financed the publication of previously unknown Tudor music and published 56 new works, including Vaughan Williams's A London Symphony, Holst's Hymn of Jesus and works by Bantock and Boughton. The trust commissioned and financed the production of Vaughan Williams's Folksongs of the Four Seasons (1950) and Malcolm Williamson’s The Brilliant and the Dark (1965). Although primarily concerned since 1935 with amateur music, the trust gave emergency help to professional groups during the war years. Beneficiaries have included the English Folk Dance and Song Society, the British Federation of Music Festivals, the Standing Conference for Amateur Music, the National Federation of Music Societies, the Rural Music Schools Association, the Amateur Music Association, the British Federation of Brass Bands, the British Federation of Young Choirs, and Contemporary Music Making for Amateurs. In ...

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Jonathan Spencer Jones

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Peter Dickinson

A program for study, research, and performance of American music, based at Keele University, Staffordshire, England. It was founded in 1974 by Peter Dickinson, the first professor of music at the university’s newly established department of music. The center, which housed an excellent collection of American music materials, sponsored the Ives centenary concerts (1974) and three international conferences (1975, 1978, and 1983, the last in collaboration with the Society for American Music, then called the Sonneck Society); in 1975 it introduced an MA in American music. Dickinson departed in 1984 and David Nicholls taught at Keele from 1987 to 2000. The center is no longer active as a result of university restructuring.

P. Dickinson: “Recent Research on Musical Traditions of the United States: a View from Britain,” IMSCR XII: Berkeley 1977, ed. D. Heartz and B. Wade (Kassel, 1981) P. Dickinson: “British-American Interactions: Composers and Students,” MT...

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Michael H.S. van Eekeren

A non-profit organization promoting the work of Dutch composers and musicians. Although there are other promoters of Dutch music in the Netherlands, CNM is unique in the range of its support. It concerns itself with contemporary and older music, with improvised and amateur music; it produces CDs and books, organizes concerts in the Netherlands, stimulates educational projects and collaborates extensively with Dutch public radio stations.

CNM started its activities in the mid-1970s as Bumafonds (BFO), a subsidiary of the Dutch composers' rights organization BUMA. During a major reorganization in 1991 it acquired its present name. Since then its activities have become both more intense and more diverse. 1992 saw the introduction of the record label NM Classics, in close cooperation with Radio Netherlands, to release recordings of Dutch music of all periods, played mainly by Dutch musicians. In the same year the Bibliotheek Nederlandse Muziek (Netherlands Music Archives) was initiated. This series of books includes monographs on Ton de Leeuw and Unico Wilhelm van Wassenaer, and the correspondence (...

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Eric Blom and Beverly Wilcox

(Fr.: ‘sacred’ or ‘witty’ concert

A concert series founded in Paris in 1725 by Anne Danican Philidor, initially to perform instrumental music and sacred works with Latin texts during Holy Week and feast days when the theatres were closed. Secular works with French texts were sung in special concerts français from 1728 to 1733, and in regular programmes from 1786 to the end of the series. The Concert Spirituel was at the centre of Paris’s non-operatic musical life until the founding of the Concert des Amateurs (1769). The last director, Bertheaume, abandoned the enterprise after the 13 May 1790 performance. Concerts spirituels, not connected to the original series but consisting of programmes on the Parisian model, or simply of sacred music, had been given in Vienna and other European centres beginning in the late 18th century; in Paris, theatre orchestras and concert societies began giving them during the French Revolution. They continued during periods of royalism and eventually became part of the tradition of the Société des Concerts du Conservatoire....

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Alan L. Spurgeon

Professional organization for Dalcroze teachers. The organization promotes the artistic and pedagogical principles of Emile Jacques-Dalcroze (1865–1950), a Swiss composer and teacher whose approach to music education consists of three components: eurythmics, which teaches concepts of rhythm, structure, and musical expression through movement; solfége, which develops an understanding of pitch, scale, and tonality through activities emphasizing aural comprehension and vocal improvisation; and improvisation, which develops an understanding of form and meaning through spontaneous musical creation using movement, voice, and instruments. Dalcroze intended that the three subjects be intertwined so that the development of the inner ear, an internal muscular sense, and creative expression might work together to form the core of basic musicianship. The Dalcroze Society of America began to take shape in 1969 with informal gatherings in New Jersey and New York City, and was incorporated in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1978. It is affiliated with the Féderation Internationale des Enseignants de Rhythmique, headquartered at the Institut Jaques-Dalcroze in Geneva, Switzerland. The American society publishes the ...

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(Danish Musicological Society)

A society founded in 1954 by J.P. Larsen, Nils Schiørring, Henrik Glahn and Sven Lunn to promote musicology in Denmark, through publications and lectures, and to be a link with similar organizations abroad. It arranged congresses of Scandinavian musicologists at Copenhagen (1958), Århus (1966) and Askov (...

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English organization. It was founded in 1962 to promote a wider knowledge and appreciation of the music of Frederick Delius and to encourage the performance and recording of his works. Delius's amanuensis Eric Fenby (1906–97) was the society's first president, succeeded in 1997 by Felix Aprahamian. It has affiliated associations in the USA and France, and its members include leading Delius scholars and performers. The society organizes lectures and concerts in London and elsewhere, sponsors recordings and three times a year publishes the authoritative ...

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Pamela M. Potter

German organization for the promotion of musicology. It was founded in 1918 on the initiative of Hermann Abert to replace the International Music Society, disbanded at the outbreak of Word War I, and to serve as the central scholarly society for German-speaking musicologists. Its journal, the Zeitschrift für Musikwissenschaft, was established in 1918 under the editorship of Alfred Einstein. Plagued by the postwar hyperinflation, the society nevertheless managed to stage a scholarly conference in Leipzig in 1925, and thereafter it oversaw the series Publikationen älterer Musik, with Theodor Kroyer as general editor. Shortly after the Nazis came to power, Einstein was dismissed as editor of the journal because he was a Jew. The society's president, Arnold Schering, then completely restructured the organization on the Nazi ‘leadership principle’, renaming it the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Musikwissenschaft. The Staatliches Institut für Deutsche Musikforschung, established in 1935, gradually took over many of the society's functions, including the publication of the ...

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Johan Kolsteeg

Dutch organization based in Amsterdam. It was set up in 1947 with assistance from the Stichting Nederlandse Muziekbelangen (Foundation for Netherlands Musical Interests) and central government, with the aim of documenting and publishing modern Dutch music. This move was prompted by the loss of a number of scores, including some by Willem Pijper, in the bombing of Rotterdam in May 1940. The microfilm archives of Dutch works created at that time formed the basis of the Donemus collection after the war. The founders of Donemus (whose name is an abbreviation of ‘Documentatie in Nederland voor Muziek’) included C. Wiessing, H.E. Reeser and H. Reinink. The foundation grew under the directorship of André Jurres (1952–74), who in his various international posts did much to promote Dutch music. Around 10,000 works by some 550 Dutch composers are now available through Donemus, as well as biographical information on the composers, press releases and programme notes. Performance material of all the documented works is available on request, and scores of a limited number of works are issued. Donemus has published the journals ...

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Maud Karpeles and Alain Frogley

English organization, formed in 1932 by the amalgamation of the Folk-Song Society and the English Folk Dance Society.

Maud Karpeles, revised by Alain Frogley

The Folk-Song Society was founded in London in 1898 by a group of leading musicians in order to direct ‘the collection and preservation of Folk Songs, Ballads and Tunes and the publication of such of these as may be advisable’. Between 1899 and 1931 the society published a journal (JFSS); its 31 issues constitute a major source of English folksong transcriptions and associated scholarship, contributed by pioneers in the field such as Lucy Broadwood, Anne Gilchrist, Percy Grainger, Maud Karpeles, Frank Kidson, E.J. Moeran, Cecil Sharp and Ralph Vaughan Williams. Although concerned primarily with English folksong, the journal also included Gaelic songs.

The English Folk Dance Society was founded by Cecil Sharp in 1911 ‘with the object of preserving and promoting the practice of English folk-dances in their true traditional form’. Using dances collected by Sharp and others as a basis, the society concentrated initially on performance and educational activities rather than publication, offering classes, courses, displays and lectures, training teachers, and granting certificates of proficiency; it also fostered country dancing as a social activity. Local branches, under the supervision of the central headquarters, were established throughout England and (from ...