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Sergio Durante

( fl 1692–1706). Italian contralto castrato . His name first appears in a libretto in 1692 as Silandro in Pausania (composer unknown) at Crema, and he sang frequently thereafter in the principal Italian centres in lead and second-lead male parts. In Venice he appeared at S Giovanni Grisostomo in operas by C. F. Pollarolo (...

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Rudolf A. Rasch

(b Amsterdam, Nov 16, 1664; d Batavia, Dutch East Indies, Oct 4, 1721). Netherlands poet and playwright . Born into a wealthy family, he studied law in Leiden and Utrecht. He was one of the most important and prolific Netherlands poets and playwrights of the decades around ...

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John Rosselli

(bc 1625–6; d Rome, 1713).French-Italian theatre builder and impresario. A French nobleman from Orléans, he became secretary in 1662 to Queen Christina of Sweden (resident in Rome after her abdication), in whose service he remained till her death in 1689...

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(fl 1691–6). Italian singer. She is described in contemporary documents as ‘torinese’, although that may refer to her service in the court of Turin; she is also described as ‘ musica di camera to His Royal Highness of Savoy’ in the libretto of ...

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(b Florence; fl 1680–1717). Italian contralto castrato . The earliest reference to him is in 1680, when he sang in Le pompose feste di Vicenza (composer unknown) in Vicenza and the role of Tazio in P. S. Agostini’s Il ratto delle Sabine in Venice. In ...

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Elisabeth Cook

(b Pesaro, 1697; d Pesaro, 1770). Italian impresario . After serving as maestro di cappella at Cortona and Pesaro, he spent some time in Moravia, where his operas Partenope (1733) and La pravità castigata (1734) were performed. He became impresario of the Regio Ducal Teatro Nuovo in Milan in ...

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Jérôme de La Gorce

(b Orléans, c1670; d Paris, 1745). French dramatist. After writing four tragedies for the Thé âtre Français, she is thought to have collaborated with the Abbé Pellegrin, who gave her advice, on several librettos: Les fêtes de l’été (1716), set by Montéclair, and ...

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The name by which the first American metrical psalter, The Whole Booke of Psalmes Faithfully Translated into English Metre (Cambridge, MA, 1640), is commonly known.

See Psalms, metrical; Psalmody; and Printing and publishing .

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Philip Weller

(d 1688). French baritone (basse-taille). Recruited in Languedoc, he first sang in Paris in 1671, in Cambert’s Pomone (as Vertumne) and Les peines et les plaisirs de l’amour. He joined the Opéra in 1672. The Parfaict brothers (MS, F-Pn ) attributed the creation of the title role in ...

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(fl 1670–1707). Italian bass. His name appears first in 1670 in Milan, where he took the role of Giacco in Ippolita reina delle amazzoni, by Lodovico Busca, P. S. Agostini and P. A. Ziani. From 11 March 1678 until his dismissal on 15 January 1707...

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Margaret Murata

(b Cupramontana, Jan 11, 1596; d Rome, Oct 16, 1653). Italian librettist. After studying at the Collegio Romano he was active in Roman literary circles from the 1620s. He was secretary to Francesco Peretti (later Cardinal Montalto) by 1630 and to Camillo Pamphili (...

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(b Rome, ?1684; d Rome, Feb 26, 1734). Italian soprano. She first appeared in opera seria at Siena in Carnival 1704 (as Garberini Benti), first sang in Naples in 1706, Florence and Venice in 1707, and became one of the stars of the day. She apparently married Domenico (or Giuseppe) Bulgarelli near the beginning of ...

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Lowell Lindgren

(b Vignola, nr Modena, June 30, 1672; d Bologna, Jan 19, 1714). Italian librettist. From his youth he was a close friend of the scholar Lodovico Muratori in Modena. He became a member of the Accademia dell’Arcadia in Rome in 1691, taking the name Cromiro Dianio; his later tragedies and musical dramas reflect many of the refining and purifying ideals of the Arcadians. In his twenties, he served various noblemen in northern Italy and in Paris, where he resided between June and ...

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Sidney Jackson Jowers

(b Udine, 1678; d Vienna, Dec 7, 1743). Italian costume designer. He was engaged at the Viennese court theatre on 1 October 1707 as ‘disegnatore da camera’ at a salary of 1200 florins, and became drawing master to Empress Maria Theresa. The year after Metastasio became court poet, Bertoli was appointed Imperial Gallery Inspector (on ...

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Paola Besutti

(b Bologna; fl 1688–1719). Italian singer . She is first mentioned in 1688, when she sang Alvilda in Carlo Pallavicino’s L’amazone corsara, ovvero L’Alvilda regina de’ Goti and Lesbia in Giovanni Legrenzi’s Lisimaco riamato da Alessandro. She appeared with singers such as Margherita Salicola, Maria Maddalena Musi and Domenico Cecchi, and sang in many Italian cities, including Reggio Emilia, Modena, Ferrara, Parma, Milan, Naples, Casale, Udine, Venice, Verona, Genoa and Pesaro. She was still active in ...

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Harris S. Saunders

(b Venice; fl 1675–81). Italian librettist . His first libretto was for the Teatro ai Saloni, a small Venetian theatre used by academics for plays and only intermittently for opera. On the title-page, he styles himself the somnolent follower of Tasso (‘sonnolento tassista’), in his letter to the reader, he emphasizes that he is not a professional. His two other librettos were for successive seasons at the Teatro S Angelo. In all three works the emphasis is on lively, often comic, stage interaction, with plots loosely based on history. ...

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Alison Stonehouse

(b Albi, 1618; d Paris, July 22, 1688). French dramatist . Over a period of 50 years he wrote 23 plays, 14 of them tragedies, the rest machine-plays and comedies. He wrote the libretto for one opera, Méduse (C. H. Gervais, 1697); mainly in alexandrine verse, its plot revolves around Medusa’s love for Perseus and her jealous reaction to his love for Ismene. Boyer viewed ...

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Michael Talbot

(b Ferrara, 1682; d Ferrara, July 26, 1752). Italian librettist. By profession he was a lawyer; most of his activity as a librettist took place during a period of residence in Venice around 1710–15. His earliest libretto was Crisippo, set by Floriano Arresti in ...

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(b Brescia; fl 1682–1722). Italian tenor . He was in the service of Ferdinando Carlo Gonzaga, Duke of Mantua, and sang Herenio, Cibele, Pescatore and Neptune in Giovanni Legrenzi’s Ottaviano Cesare Augusto in 1682; he was among the ‘virtuosi’ of the court of Mantua at least until ...

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Calinda  

Eugène Borrel

A dance, likely from Africa, that spread through Spanish America and the southern USA. The earliest known description dates from 1698, when Père Lavat (Nouveau voyage aux isles de l’Amérique, ii, 51), who called it the calenda, recorded having seen it danced, with a drum accompaniment, on Martinique. It was considered indecent by some Christian communities and subsequently forbidden, but was not wholly suppressed among the slaves....