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Caña  

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Kate Van Winkle Keller

(b Paris, France, c1762; d Washington, DC, April 11, 1841). American dancing master, choreographer, and composer of dance music. He was born into a family named Landrin with close connections to the court of Louis XVI. He was a pupil of Maximilien Gardel (1741–87), and for six years he was dancing master for the Paris Opéra. He left Paris three days after the fall of the Bastille in 1789 and arrived in Philadelphia in mid-1790. He changed his name, placing advertisements for his dancing schools as Mr. De Duport. Chiefly a choreographer and teacher of social dancing, Duport blended amateur and professional dancing with theatrical standards of content and performance. He wrote music and created hornpipes and other solo dances for his students, as well as duos such as figured minuets, allemandes, and waltzes; group dances, including complex French contredanses, cotillions, and English country dances; and ballets for his classes to perform at recitals. A music copybook in Duport’s hand traces his creative career from ...

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Speranța Rădulescu

(b Romania, 1930; d Copenhagen, 4 April 2015). Romanian-Danish ethnochoreologist. She worked as a researcher at the Institute of Ethnography and Folklore in Bucharest from 1953 to 1979. She contributed to the foundation and development of scientific research on traditional dance in Romania, where she conducted extensive fieldwork, filming dances and rituals in over 200 villages. Her main interests concerned the contextual study of dance, the analysis of dance structure, the processes of dance improvisation, and dance as an identity marker for the Roma minority group. She also investigated the way traditional symbols were manipulated in Romania for national and political power legitimation.

After 1980 she lived in Denmark, where she conducted research on topics such as continuity and change in the traditional culture of the Vlachs (a Romanian speaking ethnic minority of Serbia) living in Denmark, the Romanian healing ritual căluş, and on the theory and methods of field research in contemporary society. She was the Honorary Chairperson of the ICTM Study Group on Ethnochoreology and the leader of the Sub-Study Group on Fieldwork Theory and Methods, a Board member of Danish National Committee for ICTM, and Doctor Honoris Causa of Roehampton University, London. She had a great number of publications and a fruitful activity as a lecturer on an international level. In her last years, she worked with Margaret Beissinger and Speranța Rădulescu on the volume ...

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Kvaethi  

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Liviana  

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Polo  

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Edgardo Diaz Díaz

Primarily a legacy of Spanish traditions since the early colonial days, the seis comprise various dance and music styles emerging from Puerto Rico’s ostensibly rural areas. Name designations for these genres allude to dance forms (as in seis amarrao and seis del pañuelo); to any specific animal behavior (seis del juey); to the name of musicians or composers (as in the celebrate seis de Andino); and, more often, to the region or town where they emerge, as are the cases of seis bayamonés, seis fajardeño, or seis de bieke. Of special significance is the seis con décimas, drawing on an Arab-Andalusian-based melodic mold whereby troubadours display their individual ability to develop melodies and improvise on old poetic forms like the ten-line décima, or the four-line quatrain. Traditionally, a ten-stringed cuatro provides the singer with counter-melismatic phrases, as simple chord progressions by the guitar provide for an often elaborate bass support assisted by stable rhythms of a g...

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Soleá  

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Peter Kemp

Austrian family of dance music composers and musicians of Hungarian origin. Through a combination of melodic invention and masterly orchestral technique, allied to an astute sense of the commercial, they elevated 19th-century popular music, and especially the Viennese Waltz, to a consummate form.

Johann Strauss (b Vienna, March 14, 1804; d Vienna, Sept 25, 1849)

Johann Strauss (b Vienna, Oct 25, 1825; d Vienna, June 3, 1899)

Josef Strauss (b Vienna, Aug 20, 1827; d Vienna, July 22, 1870)

Eduard Strauss (b Vienna, March 15, 1835; d Vienna, Dec 28, 1916)

Johann Strauss (iii) (b Vienna, Feb 16, 1866; d Berlin-Schöneberg, Jan 9, 1939)

Eduard Strauss (b Vienna, March 24, 1910; d Vienna, April 6, 1969)

A Periodicals and journals. B Catalogues and bibliographies. C Lives and works: general studies. D Lives and works: particular aspects. E Stage works of Johann Strauss II....

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Stephen Walsh

(Fyodorovich)

(b Oranienbaum [now Lomonosov], nr St Petersburg, 5/June 17, 1882; d New York, April 6, 1971). Russian composer, later of French (1934) and American (1945) nationality. One of the most widely performed and influential composers of the 20th century, he remains also one of its most multi-faceted. A study of his work automatically touches on almost every important tendency in the century's music, from the neo-nationalism of the early ballets, through the more abrasive, experimental nationalism of the World War I years, the neo-classicism of the period 1920–51 and the studies of old music which underlay the proto-serial works of the 1950s, to the highly personal interpretation of serial method in his final decade. To some extent the mobile geography of his life is reflected in his work, with its complex patterns of influence and allusion. In another sense, however, he never lost contact with his Russian origins and, even after he ceased to compose with recognizably Russian materials or in a perceptibly Slavonic idiom, his music maintained an unbroken continuity of technique and thought....

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Taranta  

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Ian Mikyska

(b Boskovice, 19 Jan 1984).Czech composer and performer (voice, accordion, and tap dance). She studied the accordion (2004–10) and composition (2007–8) at the Brno Conservatory, and composition at the Janáček Academy of Music and Performing Arts (with martin smolka and Peter Graham[1]). She also studied as an exchange student at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague, the California Institute of the Arts (with michael pisaro), the Universität der Künste Berlin (with Marc Sabat), and Columbia University (with george e. lewis).

While she often works with elements outside of music, there is almost always an intense engagement with direct listening, often arrived at through intense focus on very limited material. Sources for her work include Morse code, maps of garments which she turns into scores (Shirt for Harp, Oboe, and Accordion; Jacket for Ensemble), field recordings which she notates descriptively and then asks musicians to interpret the notation (...