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Croatia  

Ex.2 Two-part song, Vinkovci, Slavonia; rec. S. Jankovíc (Žganec-Sremec, eds., 1951: 185)

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Sean Hallowell

Originally, a poem in which the passing of an individual is announced and communities to which the departed belongs are called to mourn.

Pioneered by French poets in aristocratic service, the déploration qua literary genre enjoyed a modest lifespan, with eight known works surviving from the 16th century. Longstanding custom, however, recognizes a musical tradition by the same name, one numbering 30 known compositions spanning the late 14th to late 16th centuries. Among composers the déploration ramified from a French mainstream into Spanish, Netherlandish, German, Italian, and English tributaries. Accordingly, déplorations are variably designated in sources by such terms as apotheosis, epicedion, monodia, epitaphium, lamentation, complainte, naenia, madrigale, greghesca, and elegy.

Use of the term “déploration” to denote a musical work in which a composer is commemorated may be traced to Ockeghem (d 1497). This musician, who spent almost a half-century in service to the French royal court, was memorialized by literary counterpart Guillaume Crétin in a poem of 412 lines. A frame-narrative necrology featuring a syncretic cast of characters (among them Orpheus and King David), Crétin’s déploration charges all who held Ockeghem dear with the duty of honoring “celluy qui”—according to Lady Music (another ...

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Leeman L. Perkins and Patrick Macey

In 

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Malcolm Boyd

In 

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Motet  

Example 1 Salve mater fons hortorum/[CAPTIVI]TA[TEM] (I-FL Plut. 29.1 fols. 401v–402r)

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Motet  

Ex.8 Du Fay: Ave regina celorum (iii)

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Motet  

Ex.5 Machaut tenors

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Motet  

Ex.3 Pes of GB-Ob 20, no.10

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Motet  

Ex.11 Josquin: Miserere mei, Deus

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Motet  

Example 2 Viderunt, par pou/Viderunt, por peu/Viderunt, por peu/VIDERUNT OMNES (F-Mof H 196, fols. 40v–41r)

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Motet  

Ex.7 Du Fay: Ave regina celorum (ii)

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Motet  

Ex.9 Weerbeke: Ave regina caelorum

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Motet  

Ex.6 Power: Ave regina celorum

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Motet  

Ex.12 Gombert: Media vita

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Motet  

Ex.10

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Motet  

Ex.4

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Motet  

Catherine A. Bradley, Christoph Wolff, Graham Dixon, James R. Anthony, Malcolm Boyd, Jerome Roche, Leeman L. Perkins, and Ernest H. Sanders

revised by Peter M. Lefferts and Patrick Macey

One of the most important forms of polyphonic music from about 1220 to 1750. No single set of characteristics serves to define it generally, except in particular historical or regional contexts. It originated as a liturgical trope but soon developed into the pre-eminent form of secular art music during the late Middle Ages. The medieval motet was a polyphonic composition in which the fundamental voice (tenor) was usually arranged in a pattern of reiterated rhythmic configurations, while the upper voice or voices (up to three), nearly always with different Latin or French texts, generally moved at a faster rate. In the first half of the 15th century the motet’s liturgical ties were restored, and it continued to evolve by adapting a number of forms and styles borrowed in part from the chanson, tenor mass, and, later, the madrigal. In the 16th century the motet achieved its classical synthesis in the context of the Franco-Flemish style of Josquin and his successors. Important vernacular subspecies developed later, particularly in England (...