1-4 of 4 results  for:

  • Religion and Music x
  • Medieval (800-1400) x
Clear all

Article

Joseph Dyer

Benedictine monks and nuns live in communities guided by the Rule of Benedict (c530) as interpreted by the customs of each monastery and under the authority of the abbot or abbess. They make vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience, but they also vow ‘stability’ – that they will reside in the abbey of their profession until death. Monasteries also founded priories, which have a lower judicial status. In the Middle Ages, male Benedictines were also known as ‘black monks’ from the colour of their tunic, scapular, and choir robe (cuculla).

It is improper to speak of a Benedictine ‘order’, especially in the Middle Ages, since each monastery that followed the Rule of Benedict maintained a degree of independence, based on specific customs (consuetudines) that varied from house to house. When monastic confederations like Cluny came to be established, they were often based on similarity of observance as much as on geographical contiguity. Benedictines ...

Article

Hana Vlhová-Wörner

[Domazlaus Predicator]

(b Bohemia, c. 1300; d c. 1350). Dominican friar and a leading author of liturgical poetry during the period of rising patriotic feelings in Bohemia. Several sequences to Bohemian patron saints appearing after 1300 are attributed to his authorship, among them De superna hierarchia to Corpus Christi (with acrostic ...

Article

Hana Vlhová-Wörner

(b Prague, 1348; d Rome, 17 June 1400). Bohemian archbishop (1378–96) and composer of liturgical poetry. The list of his liturgical chants (alleluias, sequences, hymns, and two full sets of office chants for Marian feasts) and spiritual prayers (cantilenae and orationes) includes about 40 items, which makes him one of the most prolific late-medieval authors. The most important part of his compositions was intended for the feast of the Visitation of the BVM that was introduced on his initiative to the Roman calendar in 1389. While his texts were influenced by Classical poetry and therefore criticized for their unorthodox vocabulary, his melodies, composed mostly in the late-medieval chant style, enjoyed great popularity.

CSHSG.M. Dreves: Die Hymnen Johann von Jensteins (Prague, 1886)G.M. Dreves and C. Blume: AH, vol.48 (1905), 421–51V. Plocek: ‘Eine neu aufgefundene Sequenz von der heiligen Dorothea und ihre Beziehung zu Jenštejns “Decet huius”’, ...

Article

Záviš  

Hana Vlhová-Wörner

[Záviš ze Zap, Zawissius]

(b c. 1350; d Olomouc c. 1422). Composer of liturgical and secular poetry. He studied at the universities in Prague (master of liberal arts), Rome, and Padua (doctor of theology and law) and acted after 1387 as an examiner at Prague University. He was the author of several liturgical chants (...