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Article

Anne Beetem Acker

Technology that allows a person to control a music-related output with commands expressed by brain signals. The output signal can control physical and virtual instruments and composition systems. Therapeutic applications include allowing severely physically disabled persons to participate actively in music-making. A number of methods of detecting and measuring brain activity have been tried; electroencephalography (EEG) has proved to be the most practical. Neural activity generates electric fields that can be detected by EEG electrodes placed on the scalp. The electrodes are placed in an array that allows mapping of neural activity over time. The signals are very weak and must be amplified and broken into frequency bands commonly labeled from low to high as Theta, Delta, Alpha, low Beta, medium Beta, and Gamma....

Article

John M. Geringer

The CMR was founded at Florida State University in 1980 to create effective research environments for scholarship in music education, music therapy, and associated areas. It facilitates research and publication by students and faculty, and combines scholarly inquiry in music with appropriate applications of technology....

Article

Ian Mikyska

(b Brno, 21 Feb 1978). Czech composer and therapist. After studies in composition at the Brno Conservatory with Pavel Zemek-Novák, he relocated to Prague, where he studied with Marek Kopelent and Milan Slavický, with whom he also completed his doctoral studies.

His music always contains an element of quieting down, of a gradual focusing. In contrast to other composers working with quietness and stillness, for Pálka, silence is always arrived at; it always stands in contrast to, and is intimately connected with, the spiritual dimension of man, often present directly in his music through the use of both sacred and secular texts.

There is an intense focus on simultaneity and the present moment in his music; materials do not repeat often and are usually clear and legible to the extreme, sometimes as gestures, other times as textures or sustained notes. The spatialization of sound is a frequent concern in his works, almost exclusively composed for specific venues. It was also the topic of his doctoral dissertation....