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Article

Guy Bourligueux

(b Salon-de-Provence, bap. Feb 24, 1674; d after 1733). French composer. He was the son of Jean Abeille, a royal notary, and may have been a choirboy at the collegiate church of St Laurent in Salon-de-Provence. From 1699 to 1700 he was maître de chapelle of the primate’s church of St Trophime, Arles; from 31 March 1713 until 17 October 1713, when he was succeeded by François Pétouille, he was vicaire de choeur and maître de musique at the royal parish church of St Germain-l’Auxerrois in Paris. No further details of his life are known.

His most important compositions were two volumes of the Psalms of David translated into French by Antoine Godeau, Bishop of Vence, dedicated to Mme de Maintenon and intended for the use of the young ladies at St Cyr. The 150 psalms are set with considerable skill and variety: the earlier ones are short and simple, but the later ones, in three parts alternating with ...

Article

Robin Bowman

(fl 1697–1706). Italian composer, violinist and organist, active in northern Europe. At one time he was in the service of the Prince of Carignan (a small town in the French Ardennes) and in this capacity appeared as a violinist before Louis XIV in 1697. About 1703 he was organist of the monastery at Kranenburg, on the present Dutch–German border. He published XII suonate a tre, duoi violini e violone col basso per l’organo op.1 (Amsterdam, 1703). One of the two surviving copies ( US-CHua ) bears the date 1706 on one partbook and the signature ‘Alberti’ on all four; a copy in Sweden ( S-L ) is also signed. The contents are all church sonatas, and each contains between six and eight movements, all in the same key. They are stolid, old-fashioned, rather uninspired works, competently written for the most part but using only the simplest imitative techniques and frequently becoming homophonic. The part for violone, which for Alberti meant ‘cello’, is sometimes quite elaborate, creating a genuine four-part texture....

Article

Manuel Carlos De Brito

(fl 1722–52). Portuguese composer and organist. Between 1722 (or earlier) and 1726 he was a royal scholar in Rome. On the second Sunday in Lent 1722 his oratorio ll pentimento di Davidde was performed in S Girolamo della Carità and on 9 July 1724 he attended the academy organized by Pier Leone Ghezzi, who drew his caricature (in I-Rvat Ottoboniano Latino 3115) with a caption describing him as a young but excellent composer of concertos and church music who sang with extreme taste. Before returning to Portugal in 1726, where he apparently became organist of the Royal and Patriarchal Chapel, his oratorio La Giuditta was sung at the Oratorio dei Filippini at the Chiesa Nuova in Rome. Its first modern performances, in France and Lisbon in 1990, revealed La Giuditta as a masterpiece which stands comparison with the best Italian oratorios of the same period.

On 22 April 1728...

Article

Robert Stevenson

(b La Puebla de Albortón, Zaragoza, bap. Sept 29, 1666; d Toledo, March 29, 1733). Spanish composer. He began music studies at Daruca at the age of 15, where he was maestro de capilla of the collegiate church, 1685–6. He held the same post at Lérida (1686–90), Jaca (1698–1700), El Pilar in Zaragoza (1700–07), the Descalzas Reales convent at Madrid (1707–10), and from 22 March 1710 until his death at Toledo Cathedral. He was apparently the last Toledo maestro de capilla to leave to the cathedral a large and important choirbook repertory; it consists of eight four-voice masses parodied on his own motets, the eight motets themselves, and three hymns. He published there in 1717 a 20-folio Disceptación música y discurso problemático defending Francisco Valls's use of unprepared dissonance. Latin and vernacular works by him survive in several Spanish collections (...

Article

Guy Bourligueux

(b Barjols, Provence, bap. Sept 24, 1680; d Marseilles, Aug 8, 1762). French composer and priest. The son of Jean-Baptiste Audiffren and Marguerite Fabre, he presumably received his initial musical training as a choirboy at Barjols church; in 1694 he entered the service of the chapter of the Old Cathedral in Marseilles, where he was taught by the precentor, Melchior Barrachin. In 1696 he received the tonsure, and about the turn of the century began to show his talents. In 1702 he became deputy precentor at Marseilles Cathedral; from 1716 to 1720 he was precentor of the primate's church of St Trophime at Arles and subsequently held the same office at Marseilles Cathedral until his retirement in August 1758. He was the teacher of Charles Levens. Audiffren's masses, although of unequal merit, contain some fine movements, and attest to the existence in southern France at this period of a concertante style of ...

Article

Christoph Wolff and Ulrich Leisinger

Member of Bach family

(46) (b Weimar, March 8, 1714; d Hamburg, Dec 14, 1788). Composer and church musician, the second surviving son of (7) Johann Sebastian Bach (24) and his first wife, Maria Barbara. He was the most important composer in Protestant Germany during the second half of the 18th century, and enjoyed unqualified admiration and recognition particularly as a teacher and keyboard composer.

He was baptized on 10 March 1714, with Telemann as one of his godfathers. In 1717 he moved with the family to Cöthen, where his father had been appointed Kapellmeister. His mother died in 1720, and in spring 1723 the family moved to Leipzig, where Emanuel began attending the Thomasschule as a day-boy on 14 June 1723. J.S. Bach said later that one of his reasons for accepting the post of Kantor at the Thomasschule was that his sons’ intellectual development suggested that they would benefit from a university education. Emanuel Bach received his musical training from his father, who gave him keyboard and organ lessons. There may once have been some kind of ...

Article

Nicholas Temperley

(fl Castleton, Derbys., 1723–53). English psalmodist and ?composer. In 1723 he published the first edition of A Book of Psalmody in conjunction with John Barber. A second edition, by Robert Barber alone, followed in 1733, and a third, entitled David’s Harp Well Tuned, in 1753. He also published The Psalm Singer’s Choice Companion in 1727. A Book of Psalmody enjoyed a good deal of popularity in the north Midlands. It was similar to other parochial collections, and most of its contents were derivative. The second edition, however, had a remarkable feature: it included, as well as chants for the canticles, a complete musical setting of Morning Prayer, litany and ante-communion on cathedral lines, but for alto, tenor and bass only. Barber made it clear on the title-page that this was designed for ‘our Country Churches’. He thus brought to its logical conclusion the trend begun by Henry Playford, who published anthems for parish church use in ...

Article

Sally Drage

(bap. Sunningwell, Oxon., June 23, 1700; d after 1758). English psalmodist and singing teacher . He was a farmer's son. One of the first itinerant singing teachers to engrave and print his own music, he was arguably the ‘father’ of the fuging-tune, which became popular in England and America during the late 18th century. A psalmody book, apparently produced in the mid-1720s, has not survived, but four later publications, all undated, make a substantial contribution to our knowledge of country psalmody. The different editions had identical titles, but the use of separate engraving plates meant that contents could vary according to the purchaser's requirements. The music, which Beesly collected but may not have composed, exemplifies the bare harmony and unresolved dissonance of much early Gallery music. Although a few previous examples exist, his claim that the 20 new psalm tunes were ‘Compos'd with veriety of Fuges after a different manner to any yet extant’ is fully justified; his tune to Psalm viii was widely reprinted....

Article

Caterina Pampaloni

(b Assisi, bap. Dec 12, 1683; d Assisi, bur. July 2, 1749). Italian composer and priest. Baptized Giovanni Domenico Antonio, he took the name Francesco Maria when he entered the Franciscan order as a novice on 25 November 1699. He served for two and a half months in the chapel of the basilica of S Francesco, Assisi, before moving to Città di Castello on 1 July 1704, perhaps having already taken his final vows. He presumably had musical duties there, for a respond for the feast of St Anthony of Padua by him is dated 20 September 1704. Between 10 April 1706 and 10 February 1707 he was in Assisi as first organist of the basilica. A Bull of Pope Clement XI of 6 November 1706 allowed him to take holy orders 13 months earlier than the minimum prescribed age of 25, and he was ordained priest at the end of ...

Article

Alexander Lingas

[Bereketēs, Petros; Byzantios, ho Melōdos, Glykys, Tzelepēs, Kouspazoglou]

(b Constantinople, ?1665; d ?1725). Romaic (Greek) composer and cantor. Though undoubtedly influenced by the works of Panagiotes, Germanos and Balasios, he appears never to have been directly associated with the patriarchal court that nurtured his older colleagues. His own substantial contributions to their continuing renewal of Byzantine chanting were made instead from the Constantinopolitan parish church of St Constantine (in the district of Hypsomatheia), where Bereketes held successively the offices of reader, domestikos, and prōtopsaltēs.

Among the traditional repertories, Bereketes virtually ignored the stichērarion and heirmologion recently ‘beautified’ by Panagiotes, Germanos, and Balasios in order to focus his compositional skills on the more structurally malleable chants of the Papadikē. He also brought the newer paraliturgical genre of the kalophonic heirmos to its highest point with the composition of 45 heirmoi for use in monastic refectories or during the distribution of antidoron (blessed bread) at the conclusion of the Divine Liturgy. Cultivating what Chatzigiakoumis and Stathis have described as a comparatively popular style of liturgical music, he occasionally composed works incorporating elements of the Arabo-Persian tradition of Ottoman secular music. Among his chants for Orthros are settings of the first and second ...

Article

Watkins Shaw

(b c1665; d Winchester, Dec 19, 1737). English cathedral musician. According to Hawkins (History), he was a pupil of Daniel Roseingrave. Hawkins’s further statement that he was a lay singer of King’s College, Cambridge, is supported by the name of one ‘Bishop’ in the college books as lay clerk from 1687 and Master of the Choristers from 1688. In 1696 he was appointed organist of Winchester College, retaining this post until his death. In 1697 he became also lay clerk of Winchester Cathedral, and was organist of the cathedral from 1729, likewise until his death. His music for the Winchester College graces was printed by Philip Hayes in Harmonia Wiccamica (1780). In 1700 Bishop published A Sett of New Psalm Tunes, and a supplement thereto in 1725. A small amount of church music by him is found in manuscript ( GB-Lbl , Lcm , Ob...

Article

Ruth Smith

(b London, July 5, 1704; d Bristol, Dec 21, 1774). English priest, religious and historical writer and librettist. He graduated BA (1727) and MA from Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, and had a successful church career, including posts as reader of the Temple Church, prebendary of Salisbury Cathedral and vicar of Bedminster, near Bristol, which he merited with several vindications of orthodox Christianity against contemporary free-thinking and a massive two-volume encyclopedia of comparative religion, An Historical Dictionary of all Religions (London, 1742). His literary work included an edition of John Dryden's miscellaneous verse, contributions to the Biographia Britannica (London, 1747–66) and a free adaptation of Sophocles' Trachiniae (with additions from Ovid's Metamorphoses IX) to suit contemporary taste for the libretto of Handel's Hercules (1745). Broughton was a lover of Handel's music, and subscribed to his Atalanta.

W. Dean: Handel's Dramatic Oratorios and Masques...

Article

Nicholas Temperley

(bap. Almondbury, Yorks. June 8, 1688; bur. Skipton, June 26, 1746). English psalmodist. Almondbury parish records show two baptisms of John Chetham, son of James Chetham: one on 26 December 1687, the other on 8 June 1688; presumably the first infant died soon after he was baptized. Axon printed a letter of 1752 by William Chetham giving details of the writer’s father, John Chetham; it is not certain, however, that this is John Chetham the psalmodist. The only certain facts about Chetham are his appointments as Master of the Clerk’s School, Skipton, on 7 July 1723 and curate of Skipton on 4 February 1741 at £30 a year, and his burial.

Chetham’s importance in English parish church music is considerable, although resting on a single work: A Book of Psalmody, published in Sheffield in 1718, but advertised in the Nottingham Weekly Courant as early as 27 February 1717...

Article

John Walter Hill

(b ?Florence, c1680; ?d Florence, c1740). Italian priest and church musician. He is not related to other musicians of the same name. He was cappellano di onore to Cardinal Francesco Maria de' Medici from at least 1708 and a chaplain at the church of S Lorenzo in Florence. From 1710 to 1736 he directed most of the oratorio performances, usually several each year, at the company of S Marco and for its subsidiary, the Ospizio del Melani. His oratorios were also frequently heard at the Compagnia di S Jacopo del Nicchio of which he was a member. At his death he left all his masses, psalms and motets to the convent of S Marco, his oratorios with orchestral accompaniment to the Oratorians of S Firenze, his oratorios ‘without violins’ to the nuns of S Domenico, and his celebration cantatas to Bartolomeo Felici, presumably his pupil. None of Conti's music has been located....

Article

(b Schaffhausen, Feb 7, 1695; d Schaffhausen, Jan 19, 1776). Swiss church musician. He came from a family from Rottweil am Neckar which had moved to Schaffhausen because of the Reformation. For 55 years (1718–73) Deggeller was Präzeptor of the senior class at the Gymnasium in Schaffhausen and Kantor at St Johann. It speaks for the esteem he enjoyed that the city authorities summoned everyone to pray for him when he underwent an operation for the removal of two gallstones in 1748.

Deggeller is important in the history of Swiss music for his work as an arranger and editor of the most important Schaffhausen hymnbook which was used officially in churches and schools from 1729 to 1842. The first part, Die Psalmen Davids, durch Dr. Ambrosium Lobwassern in teutsche Reimen gebracht, appeared in 1728 and was reprinted at least 12 times before 1830; the second part, ...

Article

George J. Buelow

(b Lübeck, March 12, 1663; d Halle, June 8, 1727). German theologian and educator. A major figure in the development of Pietism, he was a leader in the reform of education in German Protestant schools, and founded the celebrated Orphans' School and so-called Franckeschen Foundation in Glaucha, outside Halle. Francke attended the gymnasium in Gotha, 1673–9, and became a theology student at the Erfurt Hochschule in 1679. He then studied for three years at Kiel, and spent a brief period in Hamburg studying Hebrew with the scholar Esdras Edzardus. He completed his university training in Leipzig, received the master's degree in 1685, and stayed in that city to lecture in philosophy. For two years from 1687 he lived in Lüneburg, where he continued his religious studies and also experienced a reawakening of religious commitment. His Pietistic convictions were largely developed through contact with Philipp Jakob Spener in Dresden, with whom he spent two months in ...

Article

George J. Buelow

[Frischmuth, Marcus Hilarius]

(b Templin, Uckermark, bap. Dec 29, 1669; d Berlin, bur. June 25, 1745). German organist, Kantor and writer. References in his own writings to hearing church music performed in Kyritz (in the Prignitz) and Penzlau suggest that he may have been a student in those towns. Later he studied with Buxtehude’s pupil F.G. Klingenberg (from Stettin), organist at the Nikolaikirche in Berlin. Fuhrmann said that in 1690 he took some of his own compositions for examination by his music teacher, M.P. Henningsen, Kantor at the Marienkirche, Berlin. No music by Fuhrmann, however, seems to survive. Later, probably about 1692, he studied in Halle, where he was deeply influenced by the organ virtuosity of F.W. Zachow (Handel’s teacher), whom he ‘listened to each Sunday with a real hunger and thirst’ (Satans-Capelle, p.55). Fuhrmann visited Leipzig at about this time, working briefly with Schelle on contrapuntal exercises. He stated (ibid., p.52) that in ...

Article

Siegfried Gmeinwieser

(b 1st half of 18th century; d June 1762). Italian composer and priest. He is said to have come from Venice. In September 1719 he succeeded G.O. Pitoni as maestro di cappella of S Giovanni Laterano, Rome. He had a high reputation for his superior musical abilities. In January 1725 he went as mestre de capela to the court at Lisbon.

Giorgi's early work was done chiefly in Rome. He completed a stylistic transition from the high Baroque to the pre-Classical in his works up to about 1758, which were long assumed lost. Giorgi drew together the various stylistic tendencies of the Roman School, to the point of using short instrumental overtures, whereby precedence is given to individual expression rather than liturgical function. The 16-part Missa ‘Servite Domino’, on the other hand, still bears the marks of Benevoli's style.

Article

Robert Thompson

(bap. Oxford, May 24, 1688; bur. Oxford, Jan 7, 1741). English organist and music copyist, son of Richard Goodson. He was baptized at the church of St Cross. He succeeded his father as professor of music at Oxford and as organist of Christ Church. Goodson was listed as choirboy at Christ Church from 1699 to 1707 and as singing-man from 1712 to 1718; Thomas Ford ( GB-Ob MS Mus.e.17) stated that he was appointed organist of Newbury on 24 August 1709. He matriculated on 3 March 1714 and graduated BMus on 1 March 1717. A number of manuscripts in Christ Church and the Bodleian Library, Oxford, contain music copied by him, but he does not appear to have been a composer, unless two anonymous works in his hand – an act song, Festo quid potius die ( Ob MS Mus.Sch.C.143, Och Mus 37, 1142b), and an incomplete Ode for St Cecilia's Day, ...

Article

Watkins Shaw

revised by Robert Ford

(b Canterbury, bap. Jan 30, 1696; d Canterbury, March 9, 1777). English cathedral singer and antiquarian, son of John Gostling. He was educated at King’s School, Canterbury, and St John’s College, Cambridge (MA, 1719). He was a minor canon of Canterbury, 1727–77, and held livings in Kent at Brook (1722–33), Littlebourne (1733–53) and Stone-in-Oxney (1753–77). He and the Canterbury organist William Raylton were principal organizers of the Canterbury Concerts, and in this connection he was associated with William, 3rd Lord Cowper, with whom he corresponded. Gostling had strong antiquarian interests, and his well-known A Walk in and around the City of Canterbury, first issued in 1774, went through five subsequent editions. He acquired, partly from his father, a fine collection of manuscript and printed music consisting of some 1500 items; it includes a first edition of Parthenia; the contratenor and tenor parts of John Day’s ...