1-19 of 19 results  for:

  • Early 18th c./Late Baroque (1700-1750) x
  • Music Educator x
  • Instrumentalist x
Clear all

Article

Gloria Eive

(b Faenza, bap. Dec 31, 1716; d Faenza, Oct 12, 1785). Italian violinist, composer and teacher. He studied with Tartini, probably between 1730 or 1731 and 1733, by which date his name appears in the list of musicians at Faenza Cathedral, as third (and last) violinist under the direction of his brother, Don Francesco Alberghi, maestro di cappella. In 1742 he was referred to in Faenza chronicles as ‘Paolo Alberghi, Professore’, and both his virtuosity and his compositions – sonatas and violin concertos – were extravagantly praised. In 1753 he became first violinist and, on his brother’s death in 1760, maestro di cappella as well; he retained both positions until his death. Alberghi supplemented his small salary from the cathedral by playing for civic festivities and for the two academies of Faenza, and by composing and teaching; among his pupils were Bernardo Campagnoli, Antonio Bisoni, Cristoforo Babbi and possibly Giuseppe Sarti (unconfirmed). A portrait of Alberghi in the Biblioteca Comunale of Faenza (which, together with the Archivio Capitolare del Duomo, contains much biographical material in manuscript) indicates that he was blind in one eye....

Article

Mary Cyr

[not Jean-Baptiste]

(b Lunel, 1710; d Paris, Dec 1, 1772). French haute-contre singer, music teacher, cellist and composer. His début in 1733 at the Paris Opéra, according to La Borde, was in the monologue of Pélée, ‘Ciel! en voyant ce temple redoutable’ from Act 3 of Collasse's Thétis et Pélée (1689). He soon joined the Italian troupe, performing in divertissements between the acts of operas. After three years he returned to the Opéra and took several minor roles between 1737 and 1745 in Rameau's works: Un Athlète in Castor et Pollux (1737), Un Songe in Dardanus (1739), Lycurgue in Fêtes d'Hébé (1739), and Tacmas (replacing the well-known haute-contre Tribou) in the third entrée of Les Indes galantes (1743 revival). In 1743 he sang the title role in the première of Boismortier's ballet-comique, Don Quichotte chez la Duchesse, with the famous soprano Marie Fel as Altisidore. Two years later he retired from the opera to devote himself to teaching and playing the cello. He became first cellist of the orchestra at the Comédie-Italienne in ...

Article

Jean-Paul Montagnier

(b Mantes-la-Jolie, 5/June 6, 1665; d Paris, July 6, 1734). French composer, harpsichordist, theorist and teacher. He probably learnt music in the maîtrise of the collegiate church of Notre Dame, Mantes, and in that of Evreux Cathedral. According to the Etat actuel de la Musique du Roi (1773) he then studied with Caldara in Rome. In 1692 Bernier was living in the rue Tiquetonne in Paris and was teaching the harpsichord. On 20 November 1693 he failed to win the post of maître de musique at Rouen Cathedral in competition with Jean-François Lalouette. He was appointed head of the maîtrise of Chartres Cathedral on 17 September 1694 and remained there until 18 March 1698, when he obtained a similar position at St Germain-l'Auxerrois, Paris. A Te Deum performed before the king at Fontainebleau on 24 October 1700 was very successful, and was sung again in several Parisian churches in ...

Article

Edward R. Reilly

(b Provence, c1690; d Paris, Jan 13, 1768). French flautist and teacher, active in Germany. Marseilles is sometimes cited as his native city, but 18th-century sources indicate only that he came from Provence. As a young man he was taken to Constantinople by the French ambassador, and there, sometime before 1712, taught Johann Jacob Bach, J.S. Bach's elder brother. In November 1715 Buffardin entered the service of Augustus II in Dresden, and was soon regarded as one of the outstanding players in the court orchestra. Under Augustus III his stipend of 500 thalers was raised to 1000, and in 1749 he was pensioned. During his years in Dresden he maintained contacts with his homeland, and in 1726 and 1737 performed in the Concert Spirituel in Paris. He returned to France in 1750 and on 24 July of that year performed for the Dauphine. A letter by Buffardin concerning the use of quarter-tones on the flute appeared in the ...

Article

Mary Cyr

(fl 1735–55). French composer, viol player and teacher (‘maître de viole’). He worked in Paris. Throughout his Pièces de viole op.2, dedicated to the Prince of Carignan, Dollé used the signs for vibrato and ornaments adopted by Marin Marais, and the second of his three suites includes a tombeau for Marais le père, a rondeau whose chordal style, use of the high register and vibrato (called ‘plainte’) recall the expressive playing of the late master of the viol. The Pièces op.3 contains 25 character pieces for six-string pardessus de viole, which are divided into three levels of difficulty. The titles of two pieces, La Roland and La Morel, suggest his acquaintance with the viol players Roland Marais and Jacques Morel. The sonatas in op.4, though consciously italianate in melodic style, with frequent sequences, syncopations and wide leaps, still reflect the French taste in expression and ornamentation. Op.4 includes five ...

Article

Michelle Fillion

[Giannotti, Pierre]

(b Lucca, early 18th century; d Paris, June 19, 1765). Italian composer, teacher and double bass player. His first set of violin sonatas appeared in Paris in 1728. In March 1739 he was engaged as a double bass player at the Paris Opéra, a position he held until his retirement in 1758; his name also appears in a 1751 list of the members of the Concert Spirituel orchestra. His numerous compositions suggest that he may also have played the violin. One of his two-violin sonatas was performed at the Concert Spirituel in 1749, the only time he was so honoured. Yet he must have enjoyed some success, for his sonatas opp.2 and 5 remained in the catalogues of the music publisher Bailleux for eight years after his death. He also edited the collections of 12 Sinfonie opp.1 and 2 (Paris, n.d.) by Alberto Gallo, and of Sinfonie … dei più celebri autori d'Italia...

Article

Robert Thompson

(bap. Oxford, May 24, 1688; bur. Oxford, Jan 7, 1741). English organist and music copyist, son of Richard Goodson. He was baptized at the church of St Cross. He succeeded his father as professor of music at Oxford and as organist of Christ Church. Goodson was listed as choirboy at Christ Church from 1699 to 1707 and as singing-man from 1712 to 1718; Thomas Ford ( GB-Ob MS Mus.e.17) stated that he was appointed organist of Newbury on 24 August 1709. He matriculated on 3 March 1714 and graduated BMus on 1 March 1717. A number of manuscripts in Christ Church and the Bodleian Library, Oxford, contain music copied by him, but he does not appear to have been a composer, unless two anonymous works in his hand – an act song, Festo quid potius die ( Ob MS Mus.Sch.C.143, Och Mus 37, 1142b), and an incomplete Ode for St Cecilia's Day, ...

Article

Alice Lawson Aber-Count

(b Navalmoral, Toledo, ?1633–43; d Toledo, before July 21, 1713). Spanish harpist, theorist, composer and teacher. Undoubtedly the theorist Andrés Lorente (see Jambou) and the Court harpist Juan de Navas were among his teachers. Huete was the harpist at Toledo Cathedral from 13 October 1681 to 14 June 1710; however he is remembered chiefly for his Compendio numeroso de zifras armónicas, con theórica, y pràctica para arpa de una orden y arpa de dos órdenes, y de órgano (Madrid, 1702–4), which marks the climax of a golden period for the two harp types (single-rank diatonic and two-rank chromatic) predominant in Spain between 1550 and 1700. Part i of the treatise (1702), containing secular pieces, is divided into three books for the beginner, intermediate and advanced player. Part ii (1704), containing sacred pieces, also consists of three books; the first contains 26 pasacalles which demonstrate Huete’s 11-mode system; the second presents the modes in descending and ascending octaves; and the third consists of psalm settings for voice(s), harp and/or organ (the organ is secondary to the harp in the treatise). The ...

Article

(b Běleč, bap. April 21, 1730; d London, Oct 5, 1784). Bohemian violinist and composer. His father was a forester on the Wallenstein estate. He studied at the Patres Piares College, Slaný (1746–51), where he received a thorough musical education. From 1751 to 1753 he probably studied philosophy at Prague University; in 1753–4 he was enrolled in the faculty of law. Kammel’s marked musical talent, however, determined his career. At an unknown date Count Vincent of Waldstein sent him to Italy, where he was a pupil of Tartini in Padua. After returning to Prague Kammel excelled, according to contemporary witnesses, in the playing of adagios. By early 1765 (not 1774, as has often been maintained) he was in London; he is mentioned among London musical personalities in Leopold Mozart’s travel notes from that year. In 1766 he published his first compositions in London, at his own expense. He made his first known public appearance that year and his second on ...

Article

Jane M. Bowers

(bc? 1690; d Paris, Nov 26, 1762). French composer, flautist and teacher. He is sometimes erroneously referred to as Jean-Jacques. First identified as a ‘master of music’ in a marriage document of 1719, Naudot published his first compositions in 1726 and, according to Quantz’s autobiography, was among the several flautists active in Paris in 1726–7. In 1732 he was described by Walther as a ‘flourishing’ French flautist, and in 1739 was one of three flautists (with Lucas and Michel Blavet) whose ‘rare talent’ for the flute caused the poet Denesle to dedicate his poem Syrinx, ou L’origine de la flûte to them. Although it seems clear that Naudot was well known in Paris as a player, it is not known where he played; perhaps it was mainly in private salons, for the dedications to many of his works show that he had a number of aristocratic and bourgeois pupils and patrons. Between ...

Article

[Carl Theodorus]

Member of Pachelbel family

(b Stuttgart, bap. Nov 24, 1690; d Charleston, SC, bur. Sept 15, 1750). Organist, harpsichordist, composer and teacher, son of (1) Johann Pachelbel. He settled in Boston some time before 1734 (perhaps after a stay in England). In 1734 he was hired by Trinity Church in Newport, Rhode Island, to assemble an organ given to the church by the eminent philosopher George Berkeley; he served as organist there for a year. From 1734 to 1743 he taught the organist and composer Peter Pelham. He performed harpsichord and chamber music in a private benefit concert in New York in 1736, and later that year he moved to Charleston, South Carolina, where in November 1737 he gave a St Cecilia’s Day concert. In February 1740 he succeeded John Salter as organist of St Philip’s Church. On 29 March 1749 he advertised that he would be opening a singing school, but his health failed soon after this notice (according to the vestry of St Philip’s he was ‘afflicted with a lameness in his hands’, 18 September)....

Article

(b Naples, ca. 1707; d Venice, Aug 25, 1791). Italian composer, harpsichordist, and teacher. He is believed to have studied with Nicola Porpora in Naples, but little is known about his early life. The first documented performance of his music was of the opera Alessandro in Persia (Lucca, 1738), on a libretto of the Florentine Francesco Vanneschi. The poor reception of this work marked the beginning of a generally unsuccessful career as a composer for the stage. During the 1739–40 season Paradies moved to Venice, where he was employed by the Conservatorio dei Mendicanti, one of the city’s four famous schools for orphaned girls. There his reputation as an opera composer suffered further when his serenata of 1740, Il decreto del fato, proved unpopular. During this period, however, he was exposed to the vibrant Venetian musical life of the era and the progressive keyboard music of composers such as his contemporary Baldassare Galuppi....

Article

H. Joseph Butler

(b London, Dec 9, 1721; d Richmond, VA, April 28, 1805). American organist, harpsichordist, teacher and composer of English birth . He was the son of Peter Pelham, a mezzotint portrait engraver who settled in Boston in 1726. The earliest recorded public concert of secular music in the New World was held at the family's house on 30 December 1731, and the family also supported other musical activities in the city. Pelham studied with Charles Theodore Pachelbel for nine years from the age of 12, first in Newport, Rhode Island and later in Charleston, South Carolina. There Pelham taught the spinet and the harpsichord, his students describing him as ‘a Genteel Clever young man’ and ‘verey chomical and entertaining’. He was the first organist at Trinity Church, Boston (1744–9), and was organist of Bruton Parish Church in Williamsburg, Virginia, from 1755 to 1802; his evening performances (...

Article

Rebecca Harris-Warrick

(fl Paris, c1700). French harpsichordist, pedagogue and composer. Remarks in his Principes suggest that he worked as a harpsichord teacher, primarily in Paris. The first name ‘Michel’, frequently attributed to him, derives from the conflation of Saint Lambert with the singer and composer Michel Lambert, an error that goes back at least as far as Walther’s Musicalisches Lexicon (1732).

Les principes du clavecin was, as its author claimed, the first method book for the harpsichord, antedating François Couperin's L’art de toucher le clavecin by 14 years. Its first 18 chapters, devoted primarily to fundamentals of music, contain significant information regarding the range of the harpsichord, the performance practice of the slur (of particular value for the performance of préludes non mesurés) and a chapter on metre and tempo. Of the remaining chapters, one is devoted to fingering (including a fully fingered minuet and gavotte) and the other nine to ornamentation. By reproducing and commenting on the ornament symbols of four 17th-century keyboard composers – Chambonnières, Nivers, Lebègue and especially D’Anglebert – Saint Lambert provided a useful comparative perspective on the performance practices of his day....

Article

(b Hohenstein, nr Chemnitz, 1709; d Berlin, Feb 17, 1763). German harpsichordist, composer and teacher. One of the earliest references to him was in 1733, when he applied for the position of organist at the Sophienkirche, Dresden. In his application he stated that for the past three years he had been ‘harpsichordist to the king’ and the Polish Prince Sangusko. Although one of three candidates short-listed, Schaffrath was unsuccessful and the post went to Wilhelm Friedemann Bach. By the following year, however, he was in the service of Crown Prince Frederick (later Frederick the Great). He was among those who moved with the prince’s establishment from Ruppin to Rheinsberg in 1736, and on Frederick’s accession in 1740 was installed as harpsichordist in the court Kapelle at Berlin. In 1741 he was appointed musician to the king’s sister, Princess Amalia, a title which appears on contemporary publications of his music and which he was still using in the 1760s. Although he remained at Berlin until his death his name is not included in Marpurg’s register of the Kapelle (...

Article

Robin Bowman

revised by Peter Allsop

(b Brescia, c 1660; d Brescia, 1718). Italian composer, violinist and violin teacher, probably brother of Luigi Taglietti. He taught at the Jesuit Collegio dei Nobili, Brescia, from at least 1702. His music was popular in the first decades of the 18th century and was published in Italy at a time when the printing of instrumental music there was becoming comparatively rare. The Amsterdam publisher Pierre Mortier, in a 1709 list of his publications, placed him and Luigi Taglietti second only to Corelli, and they were indeed important in the development of the concerto and sonata. His concertos have more in common with the concerto grosso than with the solo type, though his op.8 features four solo violins, antedating by a few years the publication of Vivaldi's op.3, which contains some concertos for the same scoring. Occasional solo passages, including some for the viola, do, however, occur. He was among the first composers regularly to limit his concertos to three or four movements only. He shows a marked preference for only one solo treble line in his non-concerto works, witness his numerous instrumental arias (opp.3, 6 and 10) and the powerful melodic lines of his op.13 sonatas. His scorings for violoncello and violone, either together or as alternatives, have been cited as evidence of the co-existence of independent instruments....

Article

Robin Bowman

revised by Peter Allsop

(b 1668; d ?Brescia, 1715). Italian composer, trumpet marine player and teacher, probably brother of Giulio Taglietti. He was associated with the Jesuit Collegio dei Nobili, Brescia, from at least 1697; in 1702 he was recorded as maestro di tromba marina there. Like that of Giulio Taglietti, his music was popular in the early 18th century and was published in Italy at a time when the printing of instrumental music was becoming comparatively rare. The Amsterdam publisher Pierre Mortier, in a list of his publications dated 1709, placed the two composers second only to Corelli, and they were indeed important in the development of the concerto and sonata. Like Giulio's, his concertos have more in common with the concerto grosso than with the solo type, and he too was among the first composers to write concertos with only three or four movements. Some of his movements show a remarkably clearcut and enterprising ritornello structure....

Article

Pierluigi Petrobelli

(b Pirano, Istria [now Piran, Istra, Slovenia], April 8, 1692; d Padua, Feb 26, 1770). Italian composer, violinist, teacher and theorist.

Tartini's father Giovanni Antonio, of Florentine origin, was general manager of the salt mills in Pirano. Giuseppe, destined for the church by his pious parents, was to have been first a minore conventuale, a branch of the Franciscan order, and subsequently a full priest. To this end he was educated in his native town and then in nearby Capodistria (now Koper, Slovenia) at the scuole pie; as well as the humanities and rhetoric, he studied the rudiments of music. In 1708 he left his native region, never to live there again, but carrying in his memory the peculiarities of the local musical folklore. He enrolled as a law student at Padua University, where he devoted most of his time, always dressed as a priest, to improving his fencing, a practice in which, according to contemporary accounts, few could compete with him. This account of Tartini's youth has been questioned (see, for instance, Capri), but it is supported by contemporary evidence and is consistent with the later development of his personality, characterized by a fiery and stubborn temperament with a strong tendency towards mysticism. These qualities are equally evident in his writings – both letters and theoretical works – and in his compositions....

Article

Karl Kroeger

(b Leicester, bap. June 7, 1730; d Leicester, Sept 10, 1791). English composer, violinist and music teacher, a great-nephew of Robert Valentine. He was the most important musician in Leicestershire during the second half of the 18th century, teaching and performing throughout the county and beyond. He taught a wide range of string and wind instruments, including the violin, the cello, the harpsichord, the guitar, the flute, the oboe, the trumpet and the French horn. He performed on the violin (and later on the cello) in subscription and benefit concerts in Leicester and many of the surrounding county market-towns. He also owned a music shop in Leicester, where he both taught and sold a wide variety of instruments and music.

He composed music mostly for the use of his students, to assist them in gaining experience in ensemble playing. His orchestral works have been described as ‘of popular and easy character’, reflecting ‘the kind of music played at meetings of provincial musical societies, several of which subscribed to their publications’ (...