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Sven Hansell

revised by Kay Lipton

(b Venice, c1730; d Venice, after 1794). Italian singer, teacher, and composer. DeMezzo specialized in serious operatic roles and sang sacred music. Although described as both a baritone and a tenor in contemporary writings, he was often classified as a tenor, singing roles that exploited his ability to execute coloratura passages. Some of his roles were also notated in tenor clef instead of bass clef. In Pampani’s Astianatte (Venice, 1755) he is labelled a baritone, but by the late 1750s and early 60s he is referred to as a tenor (in Traetta’s Ippolito ed Aricia in 1759, in Piccinni’s Tigrane and Christian Bach’s Artaserse in 1761, and in Guglielmi’s L’Olimpiade in 1763). Heartz described him as ‘a fine singer whose baritone had a tenor extension’. This vocal profile was not unusual. During the 1740s and 50s a new type of tenor emerged, one whose vocal and dramatic profile was expanded; very often high baritones became tenors, and with this came an ability to sing coloratura passages and sustain a higher tessitura. There were a number of male opera singers who sang both tenor and high baritone roles, as commonly required in comic operas during the second half of the 18th century. Other well known ...

Article

Richard Crawford

(b Windham, CT, Nov 17, 1771; d St. Louis, MO, July 29, 1838). American composer, singer, and singing master. Although it is unknown at what schools he taught before 1808, Huntington is said to have been a singing master for all his working life, which was spent until about 1804 in and around his hometown, and thereafter in Troy, New York (1806), Northampton, Massachusetts (1807–11), Boston (1812–29), and St. Louis. On 10 May 1808 he advertised in Northampton, Massachusetts: “Musical Instruments. For sale, and instructions given by J. Huntington”; in 1818 and 1820 he advertised both singing-schools and flute lessons in Boston. His tunebook The Apollo Harmony (Northampton, MA, 1807) contained instructions for “Violincello, and German Flute.”

Huntington’s career as a compiler illustrates the shift in taste that took place in New England between 1790 and 1820. The Albany Collection (...

Article

Julie Anne Sadie

[first name unknown]

( fl late 18th century). Italian singer, keyboard player, teacher and composer . Originally from Turin, but in Paris at least from 1778 until 1783, Madame Ravissa quickly made her talents known by singing airs by Pasquale Anfossi and Antonio Sacchini at the Concert Spirituel (25 March 1778), publishing a collection of ...

Article

Anne Dhu McLucas

[Rayner]

(b London, 1747; d Philadelphia, Aug 17, 1825). English organist, teacher, composer and singer active in the USA. As a choirboy at the Chapel Royal he sang at Handel’s funeral in 1759, and Parker (1822) reports that his hat dropped into the composer’s grave. Taylor studied with Samuel Arnold in London; in 1765 he was appointed organist at Chelmsford as well as musical director and composer for Sadler’s Wells and Marylebone Gardens. He emigrated to the USA in 1792, possibly at the suggestion of his pupil Alexander Reinagle. Taylor taught and gave evening extravaganzas or ‘olios’ in Baltimore and Annapolis, briefly served as organist at St Anne’s Church in Annapolis, and was organist at St Peter’s Church in Philadelphia from 1795 until 1813. He was a major figure in the musical life of Philadelphia, active in the church, the theatre, as a teacher and as a friend and colleague of Benjamin Carr, Alexander Reinagle and J.G. Schetky. He helped found the Musical Fund Society in ...

Article

Richard Crawford

revised by Nicholas Temperley

(b Somerset, 1708; d Philadelphia, Sept 14, 1781). English singer, teacher and composer. He was parish clerk of St Mary le Port, Bristol, and was a lay clerk in the cathedral choir from 1748 to 1752. He then emigrated to New York, where he remained from 1753 to 1773. He served as clerk of Trinity Church (1753–6), where he introduced, probably for the first time in North America, something like a full choir service on Anglican lines, using a choir of charity children. On 29 December 1755 he and William Cobham gave a concert of secular vocal and instrumental music for their own benefit – the first of many such events that Tuckey organized. In 1761 he directed an anthem on the death of George II. He appeared on 1 January 1762 as Mr Peachum in a performance of The Beggar’s Opera at the New Theatre in Chapel Street, ‘for his diversion’. On ...