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Article

Gregory E. Smith

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[Michael Christian Joseph, Jr.]

(bNew York, July 2, 1942). American pianist, arranger, and composer. His father was a guitarist and bandleader. Abene performed and recorded at the Newport Jazz Festival in Marshall Brown’s International Youth Band (1958) and studied composition at the Manhattan School of Music (1959–61), though he is primarily self-taught. After working with Clark Terry, Jimmy Nottingham, and others at the Cork ’n Bib on Long Island (1960) he played piano with Don Ellis (1960–61), Maynard Ferguson (1961–5), for whom he also wrote arrangements, Buddy Rich, Harry Edison, and Georgie Auld (in Las Vegas, 1963). From the mid-1960s he performed regularly in New York at the Half Note (with the quintets led by Al Cohn and Zoot Sims and by Bill Berry and Richie Kamuca, 1965–7), Bradley’s (1972–5), Sweet Basil (1978), and Freddy’s (with the singer Barbara Rankin, ...

Article

Lars Westin

(b Spånga, Sweden, April 18, 1945). Swedish trumpeter, composer, and leader. He started playing in amateur bands around Stockholm while in his teens and worked towards a career as a lawyer before becoming a full-time musician in 1972, upon the formation of the group Egba; he eventually became the leader of the band and the main contributor of compositions to its repertory. Egba’s music combined jazz-rock with African and Latin rhythms and melodies, though its last album (it disbanded in 1991) incorporates drum machines and other computerized elements. Adåker also worked with Johnny Dyani, the Stockholm-based orchestra Hot Salsa, and Radiojazzgruppen (ii), among others. From the early 1990s he has appeared as a jazz soloist in a variety of settings, often playing in the hard-bop tradition. His own groups have varied in size from quartet to octet (including a string section), and he has displayed great skill and imagination as a composer of works for Radiojazzgruppen (as heard on the album ...

Article

Val Wilmer

(Peter )

(b Cape Town, Oct 18, 1950). South African pianist, composer, and arranger. He grew up in the District Six area of Cape Town with the guitarist Russell Herman, studied music at the University of Cape Town, and played in various groups with Herman, including Oswietie, with which they toured South Africa and Angola. After joining Sipho Gumede in the funk-jazz group Spirits Rejoice he traveled along Africa’s west coast as far as Gabon, then in 1979 he settled in London. There he worked with Julian Bahula’s Jazz Africa and with Dudu Pukwana, and in 1981 he founded the trio (later, sextet) District Six with Herman and Brian Abrahams, the latter serving as the group’s leader. In 1984 Afrika performed in the USA as a member of Hugh Masekela’s group, and in 1986 he recorded with Pukwana. He led his own quartets and quintets and accompanied the singer Carmel, and during the same period he collaborated with Masekela, Courtney Pine, and the reed player David Jean-Baptiste and performed frequently as an unaccompanied soloist. In ...

Article

André Clergeat

(b Paris, Dec 7, 1968). French guitarist, leader, and composer. He studied guitar under the guidance of Philippe Petit and Marc Ducret and was influenced by the avant-garde musicians Derek Bailey and John Zorn. After having played alongside John Abercrombie, Tal Farlow, and Dave Liebman he abandoned bop, oriented himself “beyond” jazz, and adopted a violent “jungle style,” which had nothing to do with Duke Ellington’s aesthetic of the same name but borrowed instead mainly from electronics. In the early 1990s he founded the groups Unit (including Julien Lourau) and Trash Corporation (involving Bojan Zulfikarpasic), played in the cooperative Astrolab, and appeared frequently in Henri Texier’s group. Later he joined the groups Machination (alongside Hélène Labarrière), Tribulation, and the Recyclers, and led the ensemble M.A.O. Akchoté has taught at the Centre d’Information Musicale and at EDIM (Enseignement Diffusion Information Musique).

Article

Steven Strunk

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[Emmanuel]

(bSamaná, Dominican Republic, June 24, 1922; dCroton, NY, October 2, 2001). Americanarranger and composer. He was brought up in New York, where he first played (usually baritone saxophone) and wrote arrangements for Don Joseph (1940), Muggsy Spanier (1941), Bob Chester (1942), Georgie Auld (1942–5), Charlie Spivak, and Boyd Raeburn (1943–5). Following army service (1945–6) he undertook similar work for Sam Donahue (1947), Charlie Barnet (1948–9), Jerry Wald (1949), and others. In 1951 he gave up playing to concentrate on arranging and composing. He achieved considerable success during the 1950s and 1960s with several albums recorded as the director of his own studio bands and also with his arrangements for prominent jazz musicians, including leaders of small groups (Terry Gibbs, Hal McKusick, Gerry Mulligan, Dizzy Gillespie, Al Cohn, and Stan Getz), and big bands (Count Basie, Woody Herman, Stan Kenton, Buddy Rich) as well as singers (Sarah Vaughan, Carmen McRae, Dakota Staton). From ...

Article

Jacques Aboucaya

(Bothelo )

(b Rio de Janeiro, April 28, 1950). Brazilian double bass player, pianist, and composer. From 1964 he played piano in the trio Camara, and later made a tour of France, where he settled in 1973; he then changed from piano to double bass and also studied composition at the Paris Conservatoire. He formed a duo with the pianist Jean-Pierre Mas (1978), appeared in Martial Solal’s trio, and played in Eric Le Lann’s quartet (1982). Between 1982 and 1985 he was heard with Jean-Louis Chautemps, Philip Catherine, Joachim Kühn, Michel Portal, and the Americans Charlie Mariano, Joe Henderson, and Lee Konitz. In 1985 he resumed playing piano and formed the Cesarius Alvim Connection, with Jean-François Jenny-Clark on double bass and André Ceccarelli on drums. After a period of voluntary retirement from 1992 to 1997 (though he continued to make recordings) Alvim resumed working: he composed a piece for symphony orchestra, ...

Article

Jacques Aboucaya

(b Oran, Algeria, Oct 25, 1961). French pianist and composer. After taking lessons in classical piano he went to the USA to study at the Berklee College of Music (1981–3) and then at the Manhattan School of Music (MM composition). He appeared in the BMI Jazz Composition Workshop under the direction of Bob Brookmeyer (1984) and wrote for Mel Lewis’s orchestra. Based in New York from 1985, he worked in clubs with such musicians as Joshua Redman, Bobby Watson, Ernie Watts, and Sonny Fortune and toured Brazil with Gerry Mulligan’s quartet. In 1987 he formed a quartet with the saxophonist Tim Ries for a tour of Europe, and then in 1990 recorded his first album as a leader, with Gary Peacock and Bill Stewart as his sidemen. He composed for a Belgian chamber orchestra and for the Orchestre National de Jazz in Paris. Amsallem has continued to play with Ries, and in the course of working in both the USA and Europe he recorded with the saxophonist in a trio with Leon Parker (...

Article

Barry Kernfeld and Gary W. Kennedy

(Noah )

(b Berkeley, CA, Aug 21, 1960). American bandleader, tenor saxophonist, composer, percussionist, and pianist. He played percussion and piano from an early age, took up drums while in elementary school, and began piano lessons when he was nine. In 1975 he formed his own improvisation group, the Berkeley Arts Company, and in 1977 he founded the Hieroglyphics Ensemble, which initially consisted of 16 reed and brass players and himself on drums; the following year he added other instruments to form a rhythm section. Having moved to New York state (c1979) he played percussion and drums in Karl Berger’s Woodstock Workshop Orchestra, and he toured and recorded with the group in Europe with Don Cherry as guest soloist (1979). Under Warren Smith (ii) he performed in the Composer’s Workshop Ensemble, and he played keyboards in Carla Bley’s Burning Sensations and worked briefly with Eddie Jefferson. In ...

Article

Simon Adams

(Richard )

(b Wallington, England, May 26, 1937; d Milford, Derbs., Feb 23, 2004). English composer. He first played piano and tenor saxophone, and after graduating from Bristol University (1959) he studied arranging and composition with Raymond Premru (1960–61) and Bill Russo (1962). From 1964 to 1968 he directed the New Jazz Orchestra, an ensemble that provided a forum for its members to perform their own compositions; among the musicians in the group were Harry Beckett, Jack Bruce, Ian Carr, Mike Gibbs, Jon Hiseman, Don Rendell, Barbara Thompson, and Norma Winstone. Several of these played in the occasional orchestra that Ardley subsequently led under his own name (1969–81). He wrote music for both orchestras, notably the multimovement work Kaleidoscope of Rainbows, which was recorded on an album of the same name in 1976 (Gull 1018). In 1988 he formed Zyklus with Warren Greveson and John L. Walters to perform improvised electronic music utilizing the Zyklus Midi Performance System; the group recorded its first album, ...

Article

Johs Bergh

(Syver )

(b Bergen, Norway, March 3, 1950). Norwegian pianist, composer, and arranger. He established himself as a talented player in local groups in the early 1970s. While leading his own group Ny Bris (1980–83) he also played in a Scandinavian jazz ensemble led by Carla Bley (1980) and with Thorgeir Stubø (1980–82). Having moved to Oslo in 1981, he worked with Knut Riisnaes (1981–5), led his own trio (from 1983), and toured Norway with Joe Henderson (1988). From 1988 he has lived partly in Bergen, partly in Oslo, leading his own groups in both cities and frequently accompanying visiting foreign soloists. He was the festival composer at Vossajazz (1987) and subsequently won national awards for a composition inspired by Edvard Grieg, Rusler rundt 152 (“Moving around 152” – 152 being a house number where Grieg once lived). An excellent soloist in a modern style inspired by the early playing of Keith Jarrett, Arnesen is also a creative composer, both in small- and large-group formats....

Article

Erik Kjellberg

revised by Lars Westin

(b Hälsingborg, Sweden, Aug 7, 1920; d Stockholm, Feb 11, 1971). Swedish bandleader, arranger, and saxophonist. He led a big band in Malmö (1942–9), was a member of Thore Ehrling’s orchestra in Stockholm (1949–52), and worked as a studio musician. From 1956 to 1965 he was the leader of Radiobandet (the Swedish Radio Big Band), which achieved considerable success in the USA. First presented there as the Jazztone Mystery Band (an invention of the writer George T. Simon), it was mistaken by several critics and well-known musicians for one of the leading American big bands, and it received considerable further acclaim through albums released under Arnold’s own name. The ensemble played in a modernized swing style and included such prominent Swedish and Norwegian musicians as Arne Domnérus, Bengt Hallberg, Bjarne Nerem, Åke Persson, Carl-Henrik Norin, Egil Johansson, and Georg Riedel. Benny Bailey, living in Sweden at that time, was also an intermittent member, and he recorded as a soloist with the group, as did Nat Adderley and Coleman Hawkins as guests (all on ...

Article

Raymond J. Gariglio

(b Westwego, LA, March 29, 1901; d New Orleans, Feb 6, 1948). Clarinetist and composer. He played on Mississippi riverboats with Johnny Stein, then moved in 1922 to New York, where until 1925 he performed with the Original New Orleans Jazz Band. He worked in San Antonio with the New Orleans Rhythm Masters (1926) and in New Orleans with the Halfway House Orchestra and Monk Hazel, for whom he also occasionally played tin whistle (1928). Between tours with the trombonist Sunny Clapp (1929) and the New Orleans Swing Kings (1930) he participated in the renowned recording session by the Jones and Collins Astoria Hot Eight. After working in Kansas City during summer 1933 Arodin returned to New York the following year with Louis Prima’s band; he also played there with Wingy Manone and the New Orleans Rhythm Kings. During 1939...

Article

André Clergeat

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[Mr. Swing ]

(b Paris, April 16, 1931). French tenor saxophonist, clarinetist, pianist, composer, and leader. His father was a lyric singer, and he grew up in a musical family; he studied classical singing as a child and took up clarinet in 1950. After playing traditional jazz with Michel Attenoux (from 1952) and working with Bill Coleman, Peanuts Holland, Lil Armstrong, Sidney Bechet, and Jimmy Archey, he joined Claude Bolling’s trio (1955) and toured Europe, Africa, and the Middle East with Bolling and with Jazz aux Champs Elysées, led by Jack Diéval. From 1958 his principal instrument was the tenor saxophone, which he played for many years with Bolling and as a freelance in studios. He also worked with Roger Guérin and Geo Daly (both 1957), Alice Babs and Duke Ellington (1963), Jean-Claude Naude (1963–4), Cat Anderson (recording in 1965), Paul Gonsalves (...

Article

Jeff Pressing, John Whiteoak and Roger T. Dean

[Judith Mary ]

(b Auckland, New Zealand, Oct 3, 1935). New Zealand pianist and composer. After arriving in Sydney in 1960 she quickly became a prominent studio musician. She led a succession of trios and larger groups and worked with many important Australian players, including Don Burrows and Errol Buddle; she was also active in education, notably as a staff member of the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music (from 1990, the Sydney Conservatorium of Music) and as music director of the Sydney Youth Jazz Ensemble. Her compositional output increased considerably during the 1970s, when she wrote film scores and music for children. Bailey participated in performances of Don Banks’s Nexus for jazz quintet and orchestra, and made several recordings. In the 1980s she undertook several tours of Asia and in the 1990s she remained active, recording again as a leader in 1992.

Article

Frank Büchmann-Møller

(b Copenhagen, Feb 7, 1958). Danish pianist, keyboard player, saxophonist, and composer. He began to play professionally in 1978 and studied music education at the Royal Danish Academy of Music in Copenhagen in 1981. Besides leading his own quartet he worked in the groups Blast (1980–84), Santa Cruz (1980–85), Buzstop (1982–3), Hans Ulrik’s Fusion (recording in 1988), Det Glatte Lag, and Jazzgruppe 90 (recording in 1992), and recorded as the leader of a big band which included Randy Brecker and Bob Berg (1992). From the 1980s onwards he has composed and arranged for, and played in, numerous productions at recording studios, in theaters, on radio and on television, both in jazz and in other genres. Bak has taught from 1986 at Det Rytmiske Musikkonservatorium in Copenhagen.

Article

Johs Bergh

(b Hamar, Norway, June 7, 1955). Norwegian pianist, composer, and arranger. He grew up in Oslo and began his career in jazz-rock groups in the early 1970s. He then played with Arild Andersen (1974–6), Radka Toneff (1975–82), and the guitarist Jon Eberson (1978–9), among others, and internationally with the quintet Masqualero (1982–7). From 1990 he has performed all over Europe with the trumpeter Per Jørgensen and the drummer Audun Kleive in the free improvising trio Jøkleba. For the winter olympic games at Lillehammer, Norway, in 1994 he was commissioned to write Magnetic North for an 11-piece orchestra, and in 1995–6 he toured in Japan, the USA, and Europe with this band. Balke has also composed music for various theater productions and larger works for many Norwegian jazz festivals. A musician with a broad scope, he performs in a regular modern jazz style, in a completely free manner, and in styles influenced by different worldwide ethnic musics....

Article

Catherine Collins

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[Leandro J. ]

(b Rosario, Argentina, Nov 28, 1934). Argentine tenor saxophonist and composer. Several members of his family were musicians, and he studied clarinet as a child. He moved in 1947 to Buenos Aires, where he learned alto saxophone and became first alto saxophonist in Lalo Schifrin’s band; his early influences were Charlie Parker and John Coltrane. Later he formed his own quartet and changed to the tenor instrument. In 1962 he moved to Rome, and in 1965 (or late in 1964) he joined Don Cherry’s group in Paris (to 1966). It was while he was participating in avant-garde orchestral sessions with Carla Bley (under Gary Burton’s leadership, 1967, and under Bley herself, 1968–71), the Jazz Composer’s Orchestra (1968), and Charlie Haden (1970), and also recording in a free-jazz duo with Dollar Brand, that Barbieri began to develop his own approach, moving away from Cherry’s free-jazz style towards Latin American music; he became known internationally through his performances at festivals in Bologna (...

Article

Robert H. Dickow

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[Michael ]

(b Detroit, Dec 27, 1936). American trombonist, composer, and arranger, brother of Gary Barone. He grew up in Cleveland and first studied trombone with his father, who played trumpet with Bob Crosby (briefly in 1936) and many other lesser-known bands. He also learned guitar and the Schillinger method of composition. Following military service, during which he played in army bands, he moved in 1959 to Los Angeles, where he worked with Si Zentner, Louie Bellson, and Gerald Wilson and took part in recording sessions with Dave Grusin, Tom Scott, and Lalo Schifrin. He led the first big band at Donte’s from 1966 to 1969. Although after the turn of the decade he continued to record occasionally, he largely ceased performing and concentrated on composing and arranging (his works are published by Barone Music, Jenson, and H. Leonard). Barone has written and orchestrated music for several television shows and commercials and composed scores for the Grammy and Academy Award ceremonies; in the course of an association of 23 years he contributed more than 300 scores to Doc Severinsen’s “Tonight Show” big band. His large-scale orchestral piece Themes and Variations won the first annual Shelly Manne award in ...

Article

José Duarte

(b Lisbon, July 18, 1957). Portuguese double bass player and composer. He began his musical training at the age of eight on guitar and piano and later took up double bass. After graduating from the Conservatório Nacional in Lisbon in 1979 in double bass and music theory he continued his studies in Vienna (1980–82), during which time he played with Fritz Pauer. On his return to Lisbon he joined the Radiodifusão Portuguesa Symphony Orchestra and worked with a number of Portuguese jazz groups. In 1984 he moved to Paris, where he played at the city’s leading clubs, including New Morning, Magnetic Terrasse, Petit Journal Montparnasse, La Villa, Bilbouquet, and Dunois, with artists such as Steve Grossman, Steve Potts, Barry Altschul, Aldo Romano, Hal Singer, Alain Jean-Marie, Michel Graillier, and many others. He also appeared at numerous French festivals alongside such notable musicians such as Horace Parlan, Tony Scott, Lee Konitz, Glen Ferris, and Siegfried Kessler. In ...

Article

Paul Rinzler

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[William, Jr. ]

(b Philadelphia, March 27, 1927; d Middletown, CT, Sept 21, 1989). American tenor and soprano saxophonist, composer, and teacher, brother of Kenny Barron. He first studied piano with his mother from the age of nine, but four years later changed to soprano saxophone and then to the tenor instrument. At the age of 17 he toured with the Carolina Cotton Pickers, after which he served as a musician in the army (1943–6), where his fellow bandsmen included Randy Weston and Ernie Henry. He then played tenor saxophone in Philadelphia with Red Garland, Jimmy Heath, and Philly Joe Jones; Dexter Gordon influenced his early style. In 1958 he moved to New York. There he performed and in 1959 recorded with Cecil Taylor, recorded with Jones in 1959–60, and co-led the group the Barron Brothers; he also formed a group with Ted Curson which in 1964 toured Europe, where it frequently broadcast on radio and television and recorded in Paris. He appeared with Taylor’s free-jazz group at the Newport Jazz Festival in ...