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Murray Campbell

(b Cleveland, OH, July 19, 1915; d Pittsburgh, PA, Feb 10, 2010). American scientist and acoustician. After studying physics at Case Institute of Technology (BS 1937), he carried out research in nuclear physics at the University of Illinois (PhD 1941). He then joined the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, remaining with the firm for the rest of his professional life; he retired in 1980 after a distinguished career culminating in six years as Director of Research and Development. In his youth he had become an accomplished flute player, and during his undergraduate studies at Case he encountered the notable acoustician Dayton C. Miller. This meeting led to a lifelong interest in the acoustics of the flute, and Coltman developed a laboratory at his home in which he conducted many important and illuminating experiments on flutes and flute playing. Particularly significant was his contribution to the understanding of the subtle interaction between the air jet blown across the flute embouchure hole by the player and the resonances of the air column within the flute pipe. Over four decades, starting in the mid-1960s, he published more than 40 papers on the acoustics of flutes and organ pipes. He was a member of the National Academy of Engineering and a Fellow of the American Physical Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers....

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Sarah Adams Hoover

(b Flint, MI, March 28, 1933). American organologist, curator, and tuba player. He studied tuba with Roy Benson and William Graves at Graceland University (1951–53), performed under william donald Revelli at the University of Michigan (BM 1955), and worked with William Bell at Manhattan School of Music (MM 1959). He also studied musicology with Paul Revitt at the University of Missouri, Kansas City (DMA 1969), where his dissertation focused on the D.S. Pillsbury collection of American-made brass instruments in Dearborn, Michigan. From 1961 to 1969 he was principal tuba player with the Kansas City Philharmonic and has since performed regularly on tuba as well as historical instruments including the serpent, the ophicleide, the saxhorn, and musical glasses. He served as curator of musical instruments at the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield Village in Dearborn (1971–85), producing pioneering research and curating exhibitions of early 19th-century American woodwind and brass instruments, instrument makers, and performers. From ...