1-3 of 3 results  for:

  • Aerophones (Blown Instruments) x
  • Music Manager or Administrator x
  • Instrumentalist x
Clear all

Article

Terence J. O’Grady

revised by Bryan Proksch

(b Los Angeles, CA, March 31, 1935). American trumpeter, composer, bandleader, and record company executive. He studied trumpet as a child and left college to play in the army for a two-year period. After three years of producing records on his own, he launched A&M Records with Jerry Moss in 1962. A&M’s first issue was also Alpert’s first recording as a trumpeter and bandleader, The Lonely Bull (A&M, 1962). The title track included sounds from the bullring in Tijuana, Mexico, so Alpert dubbed his band the Tijuana Brass. His music exploited a distinctive combination of Mexican mariachi-style brass with jazz rhythms, which was dubbed Ameriachi. A string of hits including “Mexican Shuffle” (A&M, 1964) and “Tijuana Taxi” (A&M, 1965) followed. In 1966 Alpert had five recordings simultaneously listed on the Billboard Top 20. His cover of “This guy’s in love with you” reached no.1 in ...

Article

Stefaan Verdegem

(b Liège, April 7, 1859; d Bruxelles, July 19, 1917). Belgian oboist, teacher, and director of the Brussels Monnaie opera house. He studied oboe at the Liège Conservatoire with Alphonse Romedenne, receiving the premier prix in 1875, and a gold medal in 1877. Guidé started his career as principal oboe of the Association Artistique in Angers, France, where he became acquainted with a number of young French composers including Massenet, Chabrier, Saint-Saëns, and Vincent d’Indy, who dedicated his Fantaisie pour Orchestre et Hautbois principal op.31 to him. In 1884 he became the oboe teacher at the Brussels Conservatoire, and principal oboe of the Monnaie opera house. Much admired by conductors and composers such as Felix Mottl, Hans Richter, and Richard Strauss—who called him ‘the poet of the oboe’—Guidé’s reputation was renowned throughout Europe. Considered the godfather of the Belgian oboe school, the most famous of his students was Henri De Busscher, who influenced Leon Goossens and the English oboe school, and, later, as oboist of the L.A. Philharmonic Orchestra, the American oboe school as well. Also gifted as a conductor and concert organizer, Guidé became co-director, together with Maurice Kufferath, of the Monnaie opera house in ...

Article

Eddy Determeyer

[Melvin James ]

(b Battle Creek, MI, Dec 17, 1910; d New York, NY, May 28, 1988). American arranger, composer, producer, bandleader, trumpeter, and singer. Growing up as an African American musician in Zanesville, Ohio, Oliver was self taught as a trumpeter and arranger. After playing in territory bands in and around Zanesville and Columbus, he became a member of Jimmie Lunceford’s orchestra in 1933. His charts for the Lunceford band were distinguished by contrasts, crescendos, and unexpected melodic variations, thereby setting new standards in big band swing and close-harmony singing. His use of two-beat rhythms also set his arrangements apart.

In 1939 Oliver was hired by the trombonist Tommy Dorsey and turned his band into one of the hardest swinging and most sophisticated ensembles of the early 1940s. In 1946 he started his own big band. During the late 1940s and 1950s he mainly did studio work, as a music director for the labels Decca, Bethlehem, and Jubilee. He continued to lead big bands and smaller ensembles, recycling his old Lunceford and Dorsey successes and performing new arrangements. Along with Duke Ellington and Fletcher Henderson, Oliver must be rated one of the top arrangers of the swing era and infused almost every chart with vigor and surprise....