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John-Carlos Perea

(b Big Cove, Qualla Boundary, NC, May 13, 1918; d Big Cove, March 28, 2012). Native American elder, singer, dancer, banjoist, and teacher. A member of the Cherokee tribe, he was introduced to Cherokee music and dance as a child by his uncle Will West Long, an elder in the Big Cove community and co-author of Cherokee Dance and Drama (Berkeley, 1951, 2/1983). He taught and performed Cherokee music and dance and formed the Raven Rock Dancers in the 1980s. Calhoun is the recipient of numerous awards recognizing his work as a teacher and culture bearer including the first Sequoyah Award in 1988, the North Carolina Folk Heritage Award in 1990, and a National Heritage Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1992. He may be heard on such albums as Where the Ravens Roost: Cherokee Traditional Songs of Walker Calhoun (Mountain Heritage Center Recording, ...

Article

Reg Hall

[Bill, Merry ]

(b Headington Quarry, Oxon, 1872; d after 1949). English traditional concertina player and morris dancer. Kimber’s grandfather and father were both central figures in the Headington Quarry Morris team that has danced annually at Whitsuntide since at least the mid-18th century. Kimber, who accompanied the Headington Quarry Morris team from 1888, learnt his concertina technique from his father.

It could be argued that the folkdance movement was founded on Boxing Day 1899, when Cecil Sharp saw the Headington Quarry Morris team perform. Sharp noted morris tunes from Kimber the next day and, when Mary Neil invited Kimber to London to teach the girls at the Esperance Guild, Sharp became reacquainted with him. Kimber subsequently became integral to Sharp’s didactic folkdance programme: Sharp lectured and played the piano; Kimber danced and played the concertina. They taught regularly at Chelsea Polytechnic and the Royal Academy of Music, and played several times at the Queen’s Hall and the Steinway Hall. After Sharp’s death, Kimber continued the same working relationship with Douglas Kennedy, Sharp’s successor in the English Folk Dance Society (...

Article

John H. Baron

revised by Georgie Durosoir

(b c1615; d Paris, April 18, 1688). French dancer, composer, poet, lutenist and lute teacher. He was director of entertainments for the Countess of Soissons from at least 1636 until her death in 1644; it was her patronage that enabled him to enter the court. He became a royal lutenist in 1646 and was still playing the lute at court in 1673. He was named a royal dancer in 1644, and it is in this capacity that he achieved his greatest renown. He danced in nearly every ballet de cour from then until 1665 (e.g. Ballet du dérèglement des passions, 1648; Ballet de Cassandre, 1651; Ballet de la galanterie du temps, 1656), often alongside the young Louis XIV and his favourite, Lully. He composed music for ballets, and sometimes also the words (e.g. Ballet des plaisirs troublés, 1657). According to the Mercure galant (July 1677...