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Article

Frank Kidson

revised by H.G. Farmer, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?London, ?1706; d London, bur. June 23, 1771). English engraver, publisher and bookseller. He worked in Covent Garden, London, having learnt the trade from his father George Bickham (b ?1684; d London, 4 May 1758), an engraver best known for The Universal Penman (1733–41). He was principally famous in music circles for his two illustrated folio volumes The Musical Entertainer, first issued in fortnightly parts, each containing four plates, from January 1737 to December 1739. The 200 plates are songs, headed and surrounded with pictorial embellishments illustrative of the song (see illustration), and engraved in the style of and even copied directly from Gravelot and Watteau. This work was the first of its kind to be published in England and quickly produced imitators such as Lampe’s British Melody, engraved by Benjamin Cole.

A second edition, corrected by Lampe, was also issued in parts (...

Article

Sylvette Milliot

(b c1693; d Paris, Nov 25, 1733). French music seller and music publisher. He was the nephew of the double bass player and composer Montéclair, and brother of the string instrument maker Claude Boivin. On 15 July 1721 Boivin bought the music shop ‘A la règle d’or’ on the rue St Honoré, Paris, after the death of Henry Foucault who had owned it; he and his uncle went into partnership to trade there. In addition to selling scores he soon published music and bought two licences in 1728 and 1729. He published works by Montéclair, Jacques Loeillet and Quantz, among others. On 2 July 1724 he married Elizabeth Catherine Ballard, second daughter of Jean-Baptiste-Christophe Ballard, who assisted him. As a result of their efforts, and the family connection with Montéclair and Ballard, ‘A la règle d’or’ became one of the foremost music shops in Paris. Works by Vivaldi, Corelli, P.A. Locatelli, Telemann and Quantz could be found there, but the mainstay of the stock was French, including cantatas by Nicolas Bernier and Clérambault, harpsichord works by François Couperin, Louis Marchand and Jean-François Dandrieu, violin sonatas by J.-M. Leclair and Senaillé, sonatas for flute by Louis Hotteterre, suites for viola da gamba by Marais and Caix d’Hervelois, motets by Lalande (...

Article

William C. Smith

revised by Peter Ward Jones

(b ?London, 1695–1705; d ?London, after1742). English music seller and publisher, father of organist and composer Benjamin Cooke. He was active in London from 1726 to 1743, and published a considerable number of vocal and instrumental works, some of them obviously pirated from other publishers, others under licence as authoritative first editions. His publications were mostly in a heavy bold style, but some were engraved in a lighter style by Thomas Cross. After Cooke’s death or retirement some of his plates were acquired by John Johnson (ii), who reissued copies from them. Cooke’s publications include Roseingrave’s XII Solos for a German Flute (1730), Handel’s Sonatas op.2 (c1733) and 42 ‘suites’ by Domenico Scarlatti in two volumes (1739). His most interesting publication, however, was that of the five books of sonatas and the 12 concertos of Corelli issued in 1732. Not only do these constitute a collected edition of the composer’s works, but all, including the concertos, were published in score expressly for study purposes, an extraordinary form of publication for instrumental music at that time. Cooke’s plates were used well into the 19th century for reissues of these works....

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?London, ?1660–65; d ?London, ?1732–5). English music engraver, printer, publisher and music seller. He was probably the son of the 17th-century engraver Thomas Cross, who engraved some frontispieces and portraits for John Playford’s publications, including the portrait of the composer John Gamble (Ayres and Dialogues, 1656), and who may have engraved some music. From 1683 to about 1710 the younger Cross often signed himself ‘Tho. Cross junior sculpt.’, as on his first known work, Purcell’s Sonnata’s of III. Parts (1683), printed for the composer. From about 1692 to about 1720 he kept a music shop in London. He was the first to issue songs in single sheet format rather than in collections, and from the 1690s a considerable number of these appeared under his imprint. At first they were engraved on copper plates, which was an expensive method considering the ephemeral nature of the sheet songs, but he later used a cheaper material, probably pewter. He had a virtual monopoly of the music engraving trade until Walsh established his business in ...

Article

Anne Schnoebelen

(d Oct 6, 1749). Italian music publisher and bookseller. His firm was active in Bologna for most of the 18th century and was famous in the art of typography and for the accuracy and elegance of its editions. In 1720, as head of a society of Bolognese printers, Della Volpe acquired the printing establishment of the widow of Giulio Borsaghi. His first musical publication was an enlarged edition (1720) of Angelo Bertalotti’s Regole utilissime per … il canto fermo. He issued a further enlarged edition in 1744 (reprinted 1756, 1764 and 1778). He ordered musical type characters from the Netherlands and in 1734 began his music printing activities in earnest, starting with Giovanni Battista Martini’s op.1, Litaniae atque antiphonae finales B. Virginis Mariae. Della Volpe was also active as a bookseller, handling the musical publications of the Bolognese printers P.M. Monti and G.A. Silvani. In ...

Article

Frank Dobbins

(fl Paris, 1690–1719/20). French music dealer and publisher. It is not known whether he was related to earlier publishers with the same family name, none of whom was apparently involved in music printing. Like other 18th-century music dealers, Henri Foucault was associated with the corporation of haberdashers and jewellers rather than that of the booksellers. He was originally a paper seller, with a shop ‘A la règle d’or’, rue St Honoré, but seems to have branched out from this trade by 28 June 1690, when a condemnation issued by the Conseil d’Etat accused him – in association with the engraver Henri de Baussen – of contravening Christophe Ballard’s royal privilege by publishing ‘divers airs de musique’. Two years later Foucault’s name appears on the title-page of Marais’s Pièces en trio pour les flûtes, violons et dessus de viole, in association with Hurel, Bonneüil and the composer, but he is still designated simply as ‘marchand papetier’. However by ...

Article

Paul van Reijen

(b Elburg, 1695/6; d Amsterdam, bur. May 14, 1768). Dutch music publisher and bookseller . On 8 May 1732 Olofsen gave notice of his intended marriage to Dirkje Jacobs in Amsterdam. He was received into the Amsterdam guild of booksellers on 9 August 1734, four days after he had settled up his burghership. In 1742 his annual income was fixed at 800 guilders, while he had his bookshop in Gravenstraat. In 1743 Olofsen was charged with the printing and selling of a ‘defamatory’ text. Later on he was imprisoned for the dissemination of libellous publications; he was released on 19 November 1749. In the late 1750s the imprint on Olofsen's editions changed to ‘Aan [At] de Nieuwe Kerk, over de Voorburgwal’. His widow was buried in Amsterdam on 28 January 1780.

A catalogue of 1755 contains about 80 titles; among them are Olofsen's own printings of chamber music, concertos and vocal pieces of Dutch composers such as J.P.A. Fischer, Leonard Frischmuth, Hurlebusch, Mahaut, F.G. Michelet and Radeker. Besides original Dutch treatises of Leonard Frischmuth, S.T. van Loonsma and Lustig, Olofsen published theoretical works, translated into Dutch by Lustig, of Quantz (...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?1665 or 1666; d London, March 13, 1736). Music seller, engraver, printer, publisher and instrument seller, probably of Irish extraction. He was established in London by about 1690. On 24 June 1692 he was appointed musical instrument-maker-in-ordinary to William III in succession to John Shaw, whose trade sign of ‘The Golden Harp and Hoboy’ he also adopted; in the same year he married Mary Allen, by whom he had 15 children, of whom only three survived infancy.

In 1695, when he began publishing, Walsh had few rivals in the trade. John Playford was dead, and his son Henry evidently lacked the initiative to maintain the family firm as a flourishing concern. Thomas Cross, while popular for his introduction of the engraved single-sheet song, was concerned more with engraving than publishing. Walsh was quick to take advantage of the situation, and engraved music appeared from his premises on a scale previously unknown in England. In addition to works by English composers he printed much popular continental music (including Corelli’s sonatas) which he often copied from Dutch editions. From about ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b London, Dec 23, 1709; d London, Jan 15, 1766). English music seller, printer, publisher and instrument maker . He probably assumed control of the business of his father, John Walsh (i), in about 1730, when the relationship with the Hare family apparently ceased and the numbering of the firm’s publications started. On 8 May 1731 Walsh succeeded to the appointment of instrument maker to the king. Although John Johnson and other rivals arose, the business continued to prosper and maintained its excellent engraving and paper. Burney characterized Walsh (ii) as ‘purveyor general’. Walsh fully developed the firm's relationship with Handel, publishing almost all his later works and in 1739 being granted a monopoly of his music for 14 years. About half of Walsh's output was of Handel compositions. The firm also sold other publishers' works, and bought up the stock of smaller firms when they ceased trading. Many of Walsh's apprentice engravers later set up on their own, including John Caulfield, Thomas Straight and Thomas Skillern. Walsh, who never married, was elected a governor of the Foundling Hospital in ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by Peter Ward Jones

(b 1678; d London, Sept 26, 1763). English bookseller and publisher . He was established in Lincoln's Inn Fields, London, by 1713, when he began to issue editions of classical authors. From the outset he often published in conjunction with Jacob (later Jacob and Richard) Tonson, issuing plays, librettos and miscellaneous works. The introduction of the ballad opera at Lincoln's Inn Fields Theatre gave Watts a brisk trade in the publication of the operas performed there. He issued the first and later editions of The Beggar's Opera (1728), and after this practically the whole of the series of ballad operas (more than 27 altogether) as soon as they were performed. These editions present the airs for the songs, printed from engraved woodblocks, as an appendix, and are especially valuable for giving the old names of the tunes. Another important work is the six-volume The Musical Miscellany (...