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Richard Griscom

(b Lorain, OH, Mar 22, 1954). American music librarian, theorist, and editor. She received her undergraduate degree in music theory from Ohio University (BM 1976). While completing studies in music theory at Northwestern University (PhD 1985), she joined the staff of the Northwestern University Music Library (1980–98). Campana was also active in the promotion of contemporary music in Chicago through performances with the ensemble Kapture (1977–86) and by editing the monthly newsletter of New Music Chicago (1982–4). Her study of library science at the University of Chicago (MA 1987) led to her appointment as music public services librarian at Northwestern (1987–98). While at Northwestern, she also held appointments as lecturer (1993–8) and assistant dean for undergraduate studies (1993–4) in the School of Music and acting head of the Music Library (1994–6). In ...

Article

Ruthann B. McTyre

(b Cologne, Germany, Feb 1, 1937). American music librarian, musicologist, and editor of German birth. Ochs immigrated to the U.S. in September 1939. He graduated from City College of New York (BA 1958), then earned degrees at Columbia University (MS in library service, 1963), New York University (MA in musicology, 1964), where he studied under Gustave Reese, and Simmons College (DA in library administration, 1975). After serving as creative arts librarian at Brandeis University (1965–74), he taught library science at Simmons (1974–8), where he introduced the college’s first course in music librarianship. In 1978 he was appointed music librarian and lecturer on music at Harvard University, where he supervised the establishment of the U.S. RISM office and directed the computerization of the music library’s vast catalog. In 1988, Ochs became Richard F. French Librarian, the first endowed chair in music librarianship. He moved back to New York to become music editor at W.W. Norton publishers (...

Article

Jon Newsom

revised by H. Wiley Hitchcock

(b Lafayette [now part of Jersey City], NJ, Oct 6, 1873; d New York, Oct 30, 1928). American musicologist, librarian, editor and composer. As a boy he was sent to Germany to study; he was a piano pupil of James Kwast (1883–93) and later attended courses at the universities of Heidelberg and Munich, developing his interests in philosophy and, especially, musicology. He studied composition in Munich with Melchior Ernst Sachs, composition and orchestration with Iwan Knorr in Frankfurt, and conducting with Carl Schröder at the Sondershausen Conservatory.

In 1899 Sonneck returned to the USA and for three years travelled from New England to South Carolina, collecting references to American musical life before 1800, primarily from newspapers. He also did much work in the new Library of Congress building, and in 1902 the librarian Herbert Putnam made him head of the newly formed music division, where he organized and developed what was to become one of the most comprehensive collections of music, manuscripts and books on music in the world. He established its unrivalled archive of opera scores and librettos, and in ...