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Article

Lowell Lindgren

[‘Pippo del Violoncello’]

(b Rome, c1665; d London, c1725). Italian cellist and composer. He was mistakenly named ‘Filippo Mattei’ in Mattheson’s Critica musica (January 1723). He played at Rome in concerts and religious functions sponsored by Cardinal Pamphili (1685–1708), the church of S Luigi dei Francesi (1686–1711), Cardinal Ottoboni (1690–99), the Accademia del Disegno di S Luca (1702–11), Prince Ruspoli (1708–11) and the church of S Giacomo degli Spagnoli (1707–13). He joined the musicians’ Accademia di Santo Cecilia on 25 September 1690, was the organist at S Spirito in 1694 and a trombonist in the Concerto del Campidoglio beginning in 1702. He is called ‘Roman’ in the libretto for his oratorio Aman delusus (1699) and that of La stella de’ magi (1702) identifies him as a ‘virtuoso’ of Cardinal Ottoboni. He served as ...

Article

Edward Higginbottom

(b Toulouse, c1650; d Paris, March 28, 1727). French organist. He was the son of Jean Buterne (d before 1687), organist in Toulouse and subsequently Pontoise. When Louis XIV had to appoint a new organiste de la chapelle du Roi in 1678 Buterne was one of four to be chosen. He took the April quarter, the others being covered by Nivers, Jacques Thomelin and Lebègue. It may be assumed that the honour reflected his accomplishments; we have no extant music of his to judge by, apart from the manuscript Petites règles pour l’accompagnement ( F-Psg ). He was also organist of St Etienne-du-Mont from 1674 and of St Paul from 1684 in succession to Du Mont, his former teacher. In 1721 his court duties were taken over by Jean-François Dandrieu. At St Etienne he was assisted from 1723 by C.N. Ingrain, who succeeded him in ...

Article

Howard Mayer Brown

(b France, mid-16th century; d Reims, c1620). French organist and calligrapher. He was organist at the cathedrals of Laon and Reims. Between 1583 and 1587 he copied out a manuscript by François Merlin, controlleur général for Marie Elizabeth, only daughter of Charles IX. The work, Recherches de plusieurs singularités ( F-Pn fonds fr. 9152), contains drawings, diagrams and finely written texts on a number of artistic and scientific subjects, including alphabets and the Lord's Prayer in many languages, exterior and interior views of buildings (among them two showing the organs in Reims Cathedral and the Ste Chapelle in Paris), scientific diagrams and maps, music, and drawings of musical instruments. Many of the pages are signed by Cellier. The volume was prepared for presentation to Henri III. The musical section is dated 1585.

Besides tunings, canons and short compositions, a table of notes and rests, and samples of tablature, the section on music contains detailed drawings, some of them incorrect, of many instruments, including the mandore, drums, trumpet, several wind bands, musical glasses, anvil, psaltery, hurdy-gurdy, transverse flute, viol, harp, bagpipe, violin, carillon, the Turkish ‘tambora’, jingles sewn on to a dancer, clavichord, regals, lute, triangle, cittern, a neo-classical lyre, virginals, guitar and panpipes (some of the drawings are reproduced as plates 6 and 7 in ...

Article

Ulf Grapenthin

( b Dömitz, 1598; d Hamburg, Dec 31, 1654). German organist . He was taught by his father, organist at Dömitz, and by the age of 16 was active as an organist at the Schwerin court chapel. By February 1619 he had been sent to Sweelinck in Amsterdam for further tuition, paid for by the court at Schwerin, and in 1722 succeeded J.C. Augustin as court organist at Schwerin. In 1627, having received no salary for over 18 months, he felt obliged to take up employment in Wallenstein. According to his own account, he then went to Italy, and he perhaps met Frescobaldi there. Later he worked in Lübeck and in Hamburg, where he was appointed organist and clerk at the Jacobikirche in 1632, a condition of the appointment being that he marry the widow of his predecessor, Joachim Möring; together they had a son and four daughters. When Jacob Praetorius (ii), organist at the Petrikirche, died in ...

Article

William Hays

(b ? c1636; d Paris, June 17, 1694). French composer, priest and serpent player. Papillon and Poisot asserted that he was born at Beaune. Brenet, however, maintained that he was born in Paris and that he entered the Ste Chapelle as a choirboy on 24 June 1645. The records of the Ste Chapelle relating to his death and burial state that he had been a choirboy there and had served the chapel uninterruptedly thereafter. On the title-page of his one extant work he is described as chaplain of the Ste Chapelle and also of Quimper Cathedral. Four masses by him were published in Paris: Missa ‘Pulchra ut luna’ (1689, 2/1729), Missa pro defunctis (1690), Missa ‘Floribus omnia cedant’ (1691) and Missa ‘Electa ut sol’ (1691), all for four voices, except the third, which was for five. Only the first is extant. Its style is simple and largely syllabic but with points of imitation even in the longer movements; it suffers from the monotony and narrow range of the melodic lines....

Article

Joan Parets i Serra

(b Palma de Mallorca, Aug 25, 1649; d Madrid, Oct 25, 1722). Spanish guitarist, singer, composer and priest. In 1659 he was admitted to the royal chapel in Madrid as a cantorcico (choirboy) and became a cantor (adult chorister) in 1669. From 1693 to 1701 he was chamber musician and maestro de capilla of the Colegio de Niños Cantores. His loyalty to Philip of Anjou was rewarded in 1700 when he was made a chaplain in the royal chapel. His brother Gabriel (?1653–1720) was also a singer.

Guerau’s Poema harmónico compuesto de varias cifras por el temple de le guitarra española (Madrid, 1694/R) includes 27 compositions and an introduction to the principles of tablature notation and ornamentation. The pieces are all variation sets of various types. Most are passacalles, but there are also other typically Spanish dances (jácaras, marizápalos, españoletas, folías etc.). Guerau’s style is characterized by its sobriety and by the use of ...

Article

John H. Baron

(b ?Kiel, 1643; d Hamburg, May 20, 1721). German organist and writer, son of Jakob Kortkamp. He studied under Weckmann from 1655 until about 1661, and later in the 1660s he served for a short time as organist at the Jakobikirche, Hamburg, under Christoph Bernhard. His main posts – though they were not important ones – were as organist at two other Hamburg churches, the Maria-Magdalena Kloster (1669–1721) and St Gertrud (1676–1721). His only known composition is a jigg. He also arranged for organ a Magnificat secundi toni by Weckmann and wrote the alto and tenor parts of a cantata by Bernhard. His importance lies in his manuscript chronicle of north German music from 1291 to about 1718, written between 1702 and 1718 (it is now in D-Ha ). This gives invaluable accounts of north German organs and their sounds, as well as information about the lives and works of organists, clergy and Kantors, notably in the 16th and 17th centuries. The information he gave on the men whom he and his father knew personally, such as Hieronymus and Jacob Praetorius, Weckmann and Bernhard, is particularly important....

Article

Robert Strizich

revised by Craig H. Russell

(b Santa María Ribarredonda, nr Burgos, before probably 1650). Spanish guitarist, harpist, composer and priest. He studied for the priesthood at the collegiate church of Villafranca del Bierzo, where he later became a prebendary. In his Luz y norte musical he stated that he began his musical studies after his ordination while in the service of the Counts Lemos and Andrade and their patron Don Fadrique of Toledo, Marquis of Villafranca. Other statements in this book imply possible affiliations with the Spanish court. He also mentioned having visited ‘remote and overseas provinces’ – undoubtedly a reference to his trip to Peru in 1677 with his patron, the Count of Lemos. The count’s entourage at the time included not only Ruiz de Ribayaz but also the distinguished theatre composer Tomás de Torrejón y Velasco, the finest composer in South America during the 18th century.

Ruiz de Ribayaz is known only through his ...

Article

Robert Strizich

revised by Richard Pinnell

(b Calanda, Aragon, mid-17th century; d early 18th century). Spanish guitarist, composer, and priest. Early in his life he received a Bachelor of Theology degree from the University of Salamanca and later travelled to Italy, where he studied music under Cristoforo Caresana and Lelio Colista, and possibly also under Orazio Benevoli and Pietro Andrea Ziani. On returning to Spain he published not only his Instrucción de música sobre la guitarra española but also two literary works: a Spanish translation of Daniello Bartoli’s L’uomo de lettere (Madrid, 1678) and a eulogy in praise of Pope Innocent XI entitled Ecos sagrados (Madrid, 1681).

Sanz’s Instrucción de música is the most comprehensive guitar treatise of its time. Comprising three books, it contains 90 pieces written for a five-course instrument tuned a/a–d′/d–g/g–b/b–e′. Most of its pieces are based on dance forms, such as the ...

Article

(d Hamburg, c1629). German organist. Early in 1595 he was appointed organist in Wöhrden, in the Dithmarschen region of Schleswig-Holstein, where his two sons, Heinrich and the painter Philipp, may have been born. It is uncertain whether he had another post before he moved to the Catharinenkirche in Hamburg in 1604. In that year the Melodeyen Gesangbuch, which contains Scheidemann's only extant compositions, was published. Shortly after his appointment, he initiated an extensive rebuilding of the organ in the Catharinenkirche, undertaken in 1605–6 by Hans Scherer the elder. Scheidemann's organ compositions, like those of many of his colleagues, do not survive. The 14 cantional settings in the Melodeyen Gesangbuch (Hamburg, 1604; ed. K. Ladda and K. Beckmann (Singen, 1995)), despite the limited stylistic range imposed by the publisher, show some lively and rhythmically interesting part-writing, particularly in the lower voices.

R. Hansen: ‘Zur Topographie und Geschichte Dithmarschens’, ...

Article

Karl-Ernst Bergunder

[Nikolaus]

(b Erfurt, Aug 31, 1609; d Erfurt, April 5, 1680). German writer on music and organist. He spent his whole life at Erfurt. He attended the St Michael Lateinschule until 1621, when he transferred to the Protestant Ratsgymnasium, which was at that time noted for its fostering of music. One of his teachers there was Liborius Capsius, director of the collegium musicum and an important Erfurt University professor. He matriculated at the university in 1626, took his bachelor’s degree in 1628 and became a Master of Philosophy in 1629. He then became organist at the Protestant Thomaskirche and at the Catholic church of the Neuwerk monastery. From 1632 to 1635 he was Kantor and teacher at the Protestant school of preaching and also studied theology. In 1635 he was ordained and became deacon (in 1638 pastor) of the Kaufmannskirche in succession to Joseph Bötticher, who had won a good reputation as a musician. In ...

Article

Edward Higginbottom and G.B. Sharp

(b c1640; d Paris, 1693). French organist . He was a member of a family of musicians active over several centuries, most of them as organists. He was organist of the Paris churches of St André-des-Arts in 1656, St Germain-des-Prés in 1667 and of St Jacques-de-la-Boucherie in 1669. In 1678 he was nominated organiste du roi, the highest appointment in the land. Thomelin was clearly one of the most talented organists of his generation; Titon du Tillet (Le Parnasse françois, Paris, 1732/R) reported that crowds flocked to hear him on feast days. From the same source we learn that Thomelin taught François Couperin (ii), becoming ‘a second father’ to him following the early death of François’s natural father; on his death Thomelin was succeeded at court by his pupil. There is no trace of Thomelin’s organ music, if indeed he ever committed any of it to paper, but an unexceptional allemande for harpsichord survives (ed. in L’organiste liturgique, xviii, Paris, ...

Article

John Morehen