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Article

Theophil Antonicek

(b ?Milan, c1644; d Vienna, Sept 22, 1685). Italian composer and musician. He is first heard of in a letter of 6 September 1671 in which the Prince-Bishop of Olomouc, Karl Liechtenstein-Kastelkorn, told J.H. Schmelzer that he need not have apologized for some apparent bad behaviour on Albertini’s part, since he himself in any case had a good opinion of him. At the time of his death (he was murdered) Albertini was chamber musician in Vienna to the dowager Empress Eleonora. He himself prepared for publication his printed collection of sonatas and signed the dedication to Leopold I, but it did not appear until seven years after his death (the delay may have been due to the cost of engraving, towards which the emperor had granted a subsidy as early as 1686). The 12 sonatas have no regular pattern or number of movements. Most of the opening and closing movements are adagios; two sonatas begin with a separate movement marked ‘Praeludium’ characterized by figuration over a supporting bass. The form of each movement stems as a rule from freely varied development of phrases – usually, but not always, the initial one – which reappear in new guises and thus with a fresh impulse. Larger sections are never repeated literally. In a few of the sonatas there are thematic connections between several (though never between all) movements. Sonata no.9 is a passacaglia whose theme is presented at the beginning and end as a canon at the 5th and whose formal sections sometimes overlap with the statements of the ostinato theme. Double stopping appears conspicuously in the last sonata, which consists entirely of imitative movements....

Article

Donna G. Cardamone

(b Corato; d Bari, after 1608). Italian composer and anthologist. Antiquis was associated with the basilica of S Nicola, Bari, for most of his career, first as cleric (from 1565), then as canon and choirmaster. From 1606 to 1608 he was chaplain and singing teacher of the Conservatorio dei Poveri di Gesù Cristo in Naples. His two anthologies of 1574 (dedicated to the banker Daniello Centurione) contain 13 of his own villanellas and 31 by various musicians employed in Bari, among them Pomponio Nenna and Stefano Felis. His villanellas usually open homorhythmically and proceed in lightly imitative textures. Two books of madrigals by Antiquis are listed in the catalogue of the library of Federico Franzini, compiled in 1676 (Mischiati nos.XII:26–7); they do not survive. He also published a number of instrumental bicinia in anthologies.

Article

[Roggerio]

(b Castelnuovo di Garfagnana; fl 1612). Italian music editor and composer. He edited Responsoria Hebdomadae Sanctae, psalmi, Benedictus, et Miserere, una cum missa ac vesperis Sabbati Sancti, for eight voices and continuo (Venice, 1612²). It includes pieces by 20 composers, among them Croce and Viadana, and two are anonymous; Argilliano himself, with 11 pieces, is the best-represented composer....

Article

John Morehen

(b 1591; fl c1641). English music editor and composer. He may well have been the John Barnard who was a lay clerk at Canterbury Cathedral between 1618 and 1622, and whose age at the time of his marriage in 1619 was given as ‘about 28’. Barnard, who was a minor canon of St Paul's Cathedral, London, in the early 17th century, was the compiler of The First Book of Selected Church Musick (London, 1641/R). This anthology of church music by 19 leading composers of the late 16th and early 17th centuries was the only printed collection of English liturgical music to appear between Day's Certaine notes (London, 1565) and the Civil War. It comprised ten partbooks – Medius, Primus and Secundus Contratenor, Tenor and Bassus, for each side of the choir, Decani and Cantoris. Only 38 partbooks are now extant, of which 33 are imperfect. No printed organbook exists, and it seems most unlikely that one was ever published, though it may be that the ‘Batten’ Organbook would have served as a source for one. A much larger collection of English liturgical music which Barnard assembled in manuscript between about ...

Article

Erik Kjellberg

revised by Paul Whitehead

(fl 1650–70). German composer, editor and musician. He is known to have been the principal musicus ordinarius in Frankfurt. He was nominated in 1650 but was expelled a few years later for indecent behaviour; he returned to the position in 1670. His name is connected with two collections of dance music for four-part string ensemble and basso continuo. Continuatio exercitii musici (Frankfurt, 1666), includes 50 dance pieces bearing his name, presumably as composer, arranged into suites and according to the title pages he arranged and edited the anonymous pieces of this volume and of its successor, Continuatio exercitii musici secunda (1670). The 1666 volume was the second edition of Exercitium musicum (1660); this publication makes no mention of Beck, although it is possible that he had an editorial role here too. It includes pieces in scordatura and features a wider range of genres than its successor volumes. The latter, however, contain information on the optional deletion of parts, apparently to accommodate varying levels of skill in the performers. Indeed, the idea of bringing together performers with differing levels of ability in an instructional setting may well have had some bearing on the titles of the collections. (Å. Davidsson: ...

Article

Otto Riemer

revised by Clytus Gottwald

(b Lichtenberg, Vogtland, 1576; d Gross Osterhausen, Thuringia, 1636). German music editor, composer and clergyman. He received his musical and academic education in the electoral choir school at Dresden, at Leipzig and at Schulpforta, where he was greatly influenced by Sethus Calvisius. In 1600 he became Kantor at Schulpforta and in 1603 pastor at nearby Rehausen and in 1608 at Gross Osterhausen, near Querfurt, where he remained until his death.

As a composer Bodenschatz remained within the bounds of contemporary practice. His masterly Magnificat and especially his 90 bicinia are nevertheless of considerable artistic merit and effectively combine an early Baroque inclination towards word-painting with supple vocal lines. His primary importance, however, lies in his Florilegium Portense, a motet anthology in two parts modelled on the unpublished anthologies of Calvisius. Intended to illustrate the practice of choral music at Schulpforta, it provides a valuable cross-section of German and Italian motet composition about ...

Article

John Bergsagel

(b c1570; d Copenhagen, Dec 20, 1632). Danish composer, anthologist, organist and instrumentalist probably of Dutch origin. Bonaventura Borchgrevinck, who was possibly his father, took him with him as a treble when he was appointed director of music at the Danish court at Copenhagen on 1 January 1587. Bonaventura left six months later but Melchior stayed on as an instrumentalist and rapidly gained the respect and confidence of the new king, Christian IV. In 1593 his salary was almost doubled, making him, despite his youth, the best-paid musician at court. In 1596 he was sent to Danzig to buy instruments and engage choristers, and at Christmas of that year he was appointed an organist with a further rise in salary. The next year he travelled to England, again to buy instruments, with the party that was sent to bring back the late King Frederik II's Order of the Garter. In ...

Article

Yolande de Brossard

(b Dompierre, bap. Sept 12, 1655; d Meaux, Aug 10, 1730). French priest, theorist, composer, lexicographer and bibliophile. He was descended from a family founded by Antoine de Brossard (b c1286), a natural son of Charles de Valois (son of Philip the Bold) and Hélène Broschart, daughter of the king's treasurer. Sébastien was the last of a family of glass-blowers from lower Normandy. He studied at the Jesuit college in Caen and then attended that city's famous university, studying philosophy for two years and theology for three. When he turned to music, therefore, he was self-taught; he studied the lute, copying and composing pieces for the instrument. He took minor orders in 1675 and became a sub-deacon the next year, but the date when he became a priest is not known, nor is the date of his arrival in Paris. He was living there in ...

Article

(b Naples; fl 1645–53). Italian music editor and composer. He was a Franciscan monk and on a title-page of 1653 is called ‘maestro di musica’. He edited a small volume of five-part sacred music (RISM 1645¹), which had gone into a fourth impression by 1650 (1650...

Article

Argia Bertini

revised by Giulia Anna Romana Veneziano

(b Florence, July 8, 1638; d Florence, Jan 16, 1703). Italian composer, teacher, music editor, theorist, organist and singer. He spent his entire life as a priest in Florence. On 1 August 1663 he was appointed chaplain at the cathedral, S Maria del Fiore, where he was also active as an organist and singer. He was particularly admired as a teacher, and it was this above all that determined the nature of his publications; the numerous reprints particularly of Il cantore addottrinato and Scolare addottrinato bear witness to the popularity of his methods. In these two manuals he sought to establish rules for the effective composition and performance of church music, contributing, according to his contemporaries, to the codification of the ‘true rule of ecclesiastical singing’. However, he is better remembered for his Corona di sacre canzoni and Colletta di laude spirituali, which have great importance for the final phase in the history of the ...

Article

Colin Timms

revised by Graham Dixon

(b Staffolo, nr Ancona, c1570–75; d ?Tivoli, in or after June 1644). Italian music editor, composer and singer, brother of Alessandro Costantini and uncle of Vincenzo Albrici. He served the Bishop of Aquila as a musician from boyhood and sang treble under Palestrina at S Pietro, Rome, where he remained as a tenor until 31 July 1610, having served as a singer at S Luigi dei Francesi in the middle of the decade. In 1610 and 1616 he directed festal music at S Giacomo degli Incurabili. He was maestro di cappella of Orvieto Cathedral from 1610 to 1614 and may have been in Naples when his op.2 was published there in 1615. By then he was in the service of Cardinal Aldobrandini, on whose recommendation he was made maestro di cappella of S Maria in Trastevere, a post he held from October 1615 to some time before ...

Article

[La Vigne, Nicolas Martin de]

(b Chalon-sur-Saône, ?c1645; d after 1702). Dutch composer, guitarist and music publisher of French extraction. In 1667 he became a citizen of Amsterdam under the name Nicolas Martin de la Vigne, dit Des Rosiers. He must have remained in Amsterdam until about 1700. He married Anne Pointel, whose brother Antoine was also a musician and music publisher in Amsterdam. The two men cooperated, mainly, it seems, during the years 1687–91. Derosiers apparently took care of the printing (using a special fount with round note heads invented by Derosiers) and Pointel handled the selling; Pointel’s shop was styled ‘Au Rosier’, a pun on Derosiers’s name. They published mainly vocal and instrumental selections from Lully’s operas and works by Derosiers himself, but many of their publications have not survived. In 1692 they sold their stock to Victor Amadée de Chevalier; later (possibly in 1698) it came into the hands of Estienne Roger....

Article

Margarette Fink Eby

(b Eisfeld, Franconia, Nov 30, 1593; d Coburg, Aug 28, 1647). German composer, publisher and editor. He received his early academic and musical training at the Lateinschule in Eisfeld. When his formal studies were over he went, after a short stay in Naumburg, to Magdeburg, where he apparently became a student of Michael Praetorius from 1611 to 1616, as is indicated by an entry that Praetorius made in 1616 in an album kept by Dilliger ( D-Cl M.49). The album also contains inscriptions by many local musicians, ministers and public officials that provide clues to the diversity of talent and widespread musical activity in Magdeburg at the time. Dilliger next moved to Wittenberg, in 1618, and matriculated at the university to study theology. He married following his appointment as Kantor at the Haupt- und Schlosskirche later that year. In 1623 he was granted the degree of Magister. Two years later he accepted a post as Kantor in Coburg, the city that became his home. The years ...

Article

Jerome Roche

[Johannes]

(b Veringenstadt, nr Sigmaringen, 1585; d Rottenburg am Neckar, 1654). German music editor, singer, teacher and composer. He studied at the University of Dillingen, one of the main cultural centres of south-west Germany, and in 1610 took a post as singer at St Martin, Rottenburg. This carried with it duties as a schoolteacher: in this capacity he became Rektor of the school in 1622 and in his musical capacity Kapellmeister of the church in 1627.

Donfrid is chiefly interesting as an editor who saw it as his task to propagate in Catholic southern Germany the best and most popular church music by Italian composers of his day. To this end he published five large anthologies at Strasbourg in the 1620s: the tripartite Promptuarii musici, consisting of motets arranged in a liturgical cycle, as had been done by other editors, such as Schadaeus, before him; the Viridarium, devoted to Marian pieces; and the ...

Article

Martin Ruhnke

revised by Dorothea Schröder

(b Klein Eichstedt, nr Querfurt, 1584; d Rostock, Sept 23, 1638). German composer, writer on music and music editor. He left home as a boy to earn his living as a Kurrende singer and later as a member of a chorus symphoniacus. After a short stay at Querfurt, he went to Eisleben, where he met the local Rektor with whom he moved to Gerbstedt in 1598. According to Rhane, he received composition lessons there from Valentin Hausmann, who, being thoroughly acquainted with Italian secular music and poetry, probably introduced Friderici to the Italian madrigal style. Friderici stayed in Gerbstedt for four years and then went, via Salzwedel and Burg, to Magdeburg, where he encountered his second principal teacher, the Kantor Friedrich Weissensee. As the latter was one of the most important German exponents of the Venetian polychoral style, Friderici acquired a knowledge not only of the current Dutch and German motet repertory but also of the latest developments towards a new international style....

Article

Martin Ruhnke

revised by Klaus-Peter Koch

(b Gerbstedt, nr Eisleben, c1560; d probably Gerbstedt, c1611–13, before Nov 11, 1613). German composer, music editor, musician and poet. He usually styled himself ‘Valentinus Haussmannus Gerbipolensis’ or ‘V.H.G.’. No documentation of his Gerbstedt period survives (much of the documentation concerning the town has been destroyed by fire), but his dedications provide a rich variety of biographical information. The descendant of immigrants from Nuremberg, he attended schools in Quedlinburg and Wernigerode (about 1570–80) and the Gymnasium Poeticum in Regensburg (about 1585–90, during the Kantorship of Andreas Raselius). After he finished his schooling he was tutor to a gentleman in Steyr, and it was during this time that his contacts with the Protestant Landesschule in Linz began. In the 1580s and 90s he was often in southern Germany. He made frequent trips to Nuremberg (in 1591, 1592, 1594 and 1597 at least), where his friend Paul Kauffmann published many of Haussmann’s works. He was also in Regensburg, Steyr, Eger, Ulm and Tübingen and Strasbourg. Throughout his life, he maintained an address in Gerbstedt, where he was probably organist; Daniel Friderici studied with him there during the period ...

Article

Friedrich Baser

(b Hammelburg, Lower Franconia, ?1633; d Würzburg, Oct 10, 1674). German composer, music editor and organist. He may have studied music with his father and with P.F. Buchner. On 19 September 1653 he matriculated as ‘physicus’ at the University of Würzburg. The next year he became organist and curate at Würzburg Cathedral. In 1658 he was ordained priest but was dismissed in 1668 for offences against canon law. Nevertheless, a year later the Elector and Prince-Bishop of Mainz, who ruled over Würzburg too and was a noted patron of music, sent him, his best-trained musician in liturgical music, to a new post in Mainz, where he commissioned him to publish new editions of liturgical books for use in the Mainz diocese. He returned to Würzburg before his death. His choirbooks, which he edited with scrupulous care, were: Opus lamentationum et passionum; Graduale; Processionale; Praefationes; Officium S. Angeli custodis...

Article

Adam Adrio

(b Bernau, Sept 4, 1622; d Berlin, May 5, 1702). German music editor and composer. He moved to Spandau as a boy when, because of the Thirty Years War, his father became a town musician there, and from 1638 to 1640 he was a pupil of the Berlin town musician Paul Nieressen. After studying for three further years at Spandau he spent five years travelling, which took him to Stettin, Elbing and Danzig, to Wehlau and Königsberg, where he studied with Johann Weichmann, to Insterburg, where he worked for about two years, and as far as Lithuania, Livonia and Sweden. After the peace treaty of 1648 he returned to Spandau by way of Denmark, Rügen and Pomerania and worked briefly with his father. In 1649 he was working at Küstrin, in 1650 in Berlin and from 1651 to 1659 in Stettin. On 1 August 1659 he succeeded Nieressen as town musician in Berlin and remained there until his death, which resulted from a stroke after he had for long suffered from palsy. His funeral oration was given on ...

Article

(b Oederan, nr Zwickau, c1595; d ?Dresden, 1659 or later). German composer, organist and music publisher. In 1605 he was engaged as a boy soprano for the Tafelmusik at the electoral court at Dresden and in 1612 was appointed as an instrumentalist there. The following year he went to Augsburg to study at the elector's expense with the renowned organist Christian Erbach, with whom he remained until at least 1615. When he returned to Dresden, he started working at composition under Schütz; this led to a long-lasting association between the two men typical of the close ties that Schütz formed with many of his pupils. In 1625 he was appointed court organist; his duties included responsibility for the musical education of the choirboys, and in this capacity he taught the organ to Matthias Weckmann. He also became active as a music publisher, first in partnership with Daniel Weixer, later with Alexander Hering. His publications included some of his own music as well as collections by his teacher Schütz (the second set of ...

Article

Randall H. Tollefsen

revised by Rudolf A. Rasch

(b Edam, c1613; d Amsterdam, c1660). Dutch publisher, composer and editor. He gave up his musical career for that of publisher, joining the Amsterdam booksellers’ guild in about 1648. He edited and published both musical and non-musical books, often for the Remonstrant Church where he was precentor, until 1658 when he went bankrupt. He had little success with his polyphonic settings of Joost van den Vondel's psalms and Diederik Camphuysen’s Stichtelycke rymen or with his own songbook Christelycke plichtrymen, but his editions of the Dutch version of the Genevan Psalter, with all melodies for the first time in the same (alto) clef, enjoyed great popularity. In fact, his method of editing the psalms soon became the standard and remained so for several centuries.

printed works published in Amsterdam unless otherwise stated