1-19 of 19 results  for:

  • Music Business, Institutions and Organizations x
  • Publisher or Editor x
  • Composer or Arranger x
Clear all

Article

(b Castelnuovo di Garfagnana; fl 1612). Italian music editor and composer. He edited Responsoria Hebdomadae Sanctae, psalmi, Benedictus, et Miserere, una cum missa ac vesperis Sabbati Sancti, for eight voices and continuo (Venice, 1612²). It includes pieces by 20 composers, among them Croce and Viadana, and two are anonymous; Argilliano himself, with 11 pieces, is the best-represented composer....

Article

(b Naples; fl 1645–53). Italian music editor and composer. He was a Franciscan monk and on a title-page of 1653 is called ‘maestro di musica’. He edited a small volume of five-part sacred music (RISM 1645¹), which had gone into a fourth impression by ...

Article

Stefano Ajani

(b Naples, Dec 7, 1827; d Naples, March 30, 1879). Italian music publisher, lawyer, poet, writer and politician. He studied the piano with F. Festa, composition with Salvatore Pappalardo and also learnt some music from his father, Guglielmo Cottrau (b Paris, 9 Aug 1797...

Article

Alexander Weinmann and John Warrack

(b Mattsee, nr Salzburg, Sept 5, 1781; d Vienna, April 7, 1858). Austrian publisher and composer. He studied music in Michaelbeuren and Salzburg and in 1800 entered Raitenhaslach Abbey. After the dissolution of the Bavarian monasteries (1803) he went to Vienna, where he taught the piano and guitar, and soon became known for his arrangements and compositions (six masses by him had been published in Augsburg in ...

Article

Darlene Graves and Michael Graves

(b Alexandria, IN, March 28, 1936). American gospel songwriter, performer, producer, and publisher. He grew up on a small farm in Indiana and graduated from Anderson College with a major in English and a minor in music. He went on to receive a master’s degree in guidance and counseling and met his future wife and song-producing partner, Gloria Sickal, while both were teaching high school. Gaither started singing gospel music as a child and in ...

Article

Walter Gerstenberg

(b Frankenhausen, March 26, 1758; d Hildesheim, Dec 7, 1841). German music publisher and composer. From 1778 to 1786 he attended the Gymnasium Andreanum in Hildesheim as a singer, and then studied law in Leipzig until 1788. On 26 March 1792 he opened a music and book shop in St Petersburg after spending a short period as a private tutor in Kiev; in ...

Article

Samuel F. Pogue and Frank Dobbins

(fl Lyons, 1550–84). French music printer, bookseller, composer and instrumentalist. In 1551 he prepared the third in a series of four books of music for guitar printed in Paris by Robert Granjon and Michel Fezandat (RISM 1551²²). In the dedication Gorlier wrote apologetically of the four-course guitar and his reasons for composing for an inferior instrument, saying that he wanted to show that it was as capable as larger instruments of reproducing music in two or three parts. Besides being an ‘excellent joueur’ on the guitar, as cited on the title-page, he evidently played the spinet; in a pamphlet (now lost) concerning Loys Bourgeois’ ...

Article

John W. Wagner

(b ?Dartmoor, June 4, 1770; d Boston, Aug 2, 1827). American conductor, composer and publisher of English birth, father of John Hill Hewitt. Apart from family records giving his place and date of birth, the first documented information about him is that he occupied 12 Hyde Street, Bloomsbury, London, during ...

Article

Lasairíona Duignan and Barra R. Boydell

(d Dublin, 1813). Irish composer, music publisher and instrument maker. George Petrie considered him to have been the ‘most eminent British composer of military music in his time’. A Collection of Quick and Slow Marches, Troops &c. can be dated 1795–8. A square piano dated ...

Article

Samuel F. Pogue and Frank Dobbins

(b Montreuil-sur-Mer, c1520; d Paris, 1598). French music printer, lutenist and composer. He was born into a wealthy merchant family from northern France. As a young man he entered successively the service of two members of the aristocracy close to the French throne, Claude de Clermont and Jacques II, Baron de Semblançay and Viscount of Tours. In ...

Article

Richard Macnutt

(b Bologna, Feb 1, 1745; d Marseilles, 1812). Italian music publisher and composer. About 1770 he began publishing in Venice and, probably in mid-1773, took the violinist and composer Carlo Canobbio (1741–1822) into partnership. Although the enterprise was temporarily abandoned about ...

Article

(b Naples, July 7, 1778; d Paris, March 10, 1866). Italian composer and music publisher, active in France. After studying harmony and counterpoint under Fenaroli at the Conservatorio della Pietà dei Turchini, Naples, he directed an orchestra and taught there before moving to Nîmes, where he became leader of the theatre orchestra. According to Pougin (...

Article

Nicolae Gheorghiță

(b Sliven, Bulgaria, c1796; d Bucharest, Nov 2, 1854). Romanian composer, psaltēs, translator, and publisher. He studied Byzantine music in Bucharest with D. Photeinos and P. Ephesios, holding over the years the positions of psaltēs, choir conductor, and teacher of ecclesiastical chant at various churches, monasteries, schools for church cantors, and theological seminaries in Bucharest, Brașov, and Vîlcea. In ...

Article

Charles K. Wolfe

(b nr West Monroe, LA, Aug 8, 1921; d Nashville, TN, Feb 24, 1991). American country-music singer, guitarist, songwriter, and publisher. He performed as a guitarist on radio station KMLB (Monroe, LA) before 1950, when he joined the “Louisiana hayride ” on KWKH (Shreveport, LA). Recording contracts with the local Pacemaker label (...

Article

David Sanjek

(b Evansville, IL, Aug 24, 1898; d Nashville, TN, Dec 1, 1954). American songwriter and publisher. It is difficult to imagine how Nashville’s country music industry would be structured were it not for the efforts of the songwriter and publisher Fred Rose. His commitment to the city and the genre helped to establish a business model that has continued successfully to the present day. He moved to Chicago in his teens and found a home in vaudeville, eventually achieving initial success as a songwriter for the “Red Hot Mama” Sophie Tucker. Some of his early material was recorded by King Oliver and Paul Whiteman, and Rose also found a role as a performer on local radio. He moved to Nashville in ...

Article

Jean Geil

(b Wells, March 15, 1867; d Oak Park, IL, June 10, 1954). American publisher and composer of English birth . After moving to the USA in 1881, he settled in Chicago. His musical career started in 1891 when, under the pseudonym W.R. Williams, he published his first song, ...

Article

Richard Macnutt

(b Paris, Nov 15, 1775; d Passy, Jan 22, 1847). French music publisher and composer, son of Jean-Georges Sieber. He studied composition with H.-M. Berton at the Paris Conservatoire, and worked in his father's publishing business from about 1795. In August 1798 he married Anne-Marie, daughter of the publisher Pierre Leduc. In ...

Article

Don Cusic

(b Clarkdale, GA, Jan 24, 1939). American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, producer, arranger, music publisher, television star, and entrepreneur. Harold Ragsdale began his musical career with a high school band that played R&B songs by the Coasters, Drifters, and other R&B groups. In 1955 the family moved to Atlanta, where publisher Bill Lowery signed him as a songwriter and secured his first recording contract with Capitol Records; Capitol’s Head of A&R, Ken Nelson changed Ragsdale’s name to Ray Stevens. After attending Georgia State University, where he studied music, Stevens had his first success with his recording of “Jeremiah Peabody’s Poly Unsaturated Quick Dissolving Fast Acting Pleasant Tasting Green and Purple Pills” (Mercury, ...

Article

Mark Berresford

(b Brunswick, MO, Feb 7, 1882; d New York, NY, March 9, 1961). American clarinetist, bandleader, composer, and music publisher. His first professional engagement (c1897–8) was with a “pickaninny” band led by Nathaniel Clark Smith. In 1902 he was assistant leader of P.G. Lowery’s band with Forepaugh and Sells Circus and later that year joined Mahara’s Minstrels band under the leadership of W.C. Handy. In ...