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André Clergeat

(b Zurich, July 27, 1939). Swiss cellist, violinist, and singer. She studied piano and violin from a very young age and played in the orchestra at the conservatory in Geneva. An encounter with Steve Lacy in Italy in the late 1960s led her to abandon classical music; the couple were married, and in 1970 they settled in Paris. Under Lacy’s counsel, as well as that of Dave Holland and Jean-François Jenny-Clark, Aebi taught herself to play cello, which became her preferred instrument in the group constituted by Lacy. She often makes use of her deep voice in the group, reciting as well as singing literary and political texts (from such authors as Lao Tzu, Guillaume Apollinaire, Herman Melville, and Brion Gysin) set to music by the saxophonist. Aebi has also performed with Kent Carter, notably in the string group Pinch with Jean-Jacques Avenel, with Takashi Kako, and with Oliver Johnson. She may be seen in the video ...

Article

(bIsmâ’ ilîya, Egypt, June 8, 1931). Frenchsinger and pianist. He studied music in Paris and played piano with Don Byas (1955) and Stephane Grappelli (1957). He was a singer with the Blue Stars (1955–6), toured and recorded with the Double Six (1959–65), and took part in a session with Jon Hendricks and others (1965). Aldebert was married to the singer Monique Dozo (b Monaco, 5 May 1931; later known as Monique Aldebert-Guérin), who had sung with Bernard Peiffer (1947) and performed in Paris clubs with Byas, Django Reinhardt, Bobby Jasper, the Double Six (with which she recorded in 1959 and 1964), and Bill Coleman (1966). After moving to the USA (1967) the couple settled first in Las Vegas, where they appeared in revues, and then in Los Angeles (...

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Adriano Mazzoletti

(b Genoa, Italy, 1908). Italian pianist, singer, and violinist. He first worked in Genoa with Tullio Mobiglia and others (1927–33). From 1934 he played piano and violin in a small band led by Kramer Gorni in Milan, which made several recordings, including Anime gemelle (1935...

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Gerhard Conrad

(b Pforzheim, Germany, Oct 6, 1929). German soprano, tenor, and bass saxophonist. After receiving three lessons on guitar from a member of the Reinhardt clan he played in dance bands until 1950. He then contacted Sidney Bechet in Paris and learned to play soprano saxophone. He played in Germany with the arranger and bandleader Ernst Simon and also with American soldiers. In ...

Article

David Flanagan

revised by Anthony Barnett

(b Copenhagen, Feb 28, 1916; d Feb 7, 2017). Danish violinist, entertainer, and singer. He began playing violin as a young child. As a schoolboy he heard the popular violinists Eli Donde and Otto Lington, but did not at first consider music as a career. He undertook studies in sculpture (at the Academy of Arts in Copenhagen), dentistry, and law, and during the same period led amateur orchestras. In 1933 he made his professional début at the Apollo Theater in Copenhagen, and the following year he formed a sextet, along the lines of Joe Venuti’s groups, which first recorded in 1935. In 1936 he heard Stuff Smith’s contemporary recordings; these exerted a great influence on his understanding of how the violin might be used as a jazz instrument. Asmussen played with the Mills Brothers (1937) and Fats Waller (1938) when they toured Denmark, and he recorded with Oscar Alemán (...

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Adam Cegielski and Barry Kernfeld

(b Słupsk, Poland, Aug 17, 1955). Polish singer. After graduating as a classical guitarist from the school of music in Słupsk she won a prize at a festival of Polish song in Opole (1979). She then worked with Janusz Muniak and others in the group Playing Family, as well as with such musicians as Marek Bliziński, Jarosław Śmietana, and Krzesimir Dȩbski. From 1988 to 1991 she studied at the Berklee College of Music, and during the same period she recorded with Michal Urbaniak, Urszula Dudziak, and American musicians. In 1994 she moved to Chicago; she has made frequent appearances at the Green Mill, and in 1998 she sang at the Chicago Jazz Festival. Auguścik’s numerous recordings include Don’t Let Me Go (1996, GMA 1724–1), an album of duos with Bogdan Hołownia, Pastels (1998, GMA 1724–2), and two albums in collaboration with Dudziak (...

Article

Erik Kjellberg

revised by Lars Westin

(b Kalmar, Sweden, Jan 26, 1924). Swedish singer. She made her début on radio at the age of 14 and her first recordings when she was 15, appeared in the film Swing it Magistern (1940), and was acknowledged as the most popular teenage idol in Scandinavia throughout the World War II years, being featured in several films and on numerous recordings, often accompanied by the leading orchestras and jazz soloists of the day. In 1949 she performed with a Swedish all-star band at the Paris Jazz Fair. In the 1950s she achieved success as a popular singer in Germany and elsewhere, then from 1958 to 1963 she was a member of the trio Swe-Danes with Svend Asmussen and Ulrik Neumann. From 1963 she performed and recorded with Duke Ellington in Europe and New York, and she made important contributions to Ellington’s sacred concerts of 1968 and ...

Article

Michel Laplace

(b Kiel, Germany, Aug 13, 1950). French trombonist and singer. He played banjo with the soprano saxophonist Jacques Doudelle (1975), then changed to trombone and worked with the soprano saxophonist Olivier Franc and, from 1979, with Maxim Saury. In 1981 he co-founded the quartet Slapscat with the bass player Gilles Chevaucherie, and from 1981 to 1984 he was in residence at the Meridian hotel in Paris, where he played with Joe Newman, Clark Terry, Doc Cheatham, and Slim Gaillard. In 1983 he joined François Biensan’s Ellingtomania, with which he recorded Almost Cried (1994, Jazz aux Remparts 64006). He also played with the Parad Brass Band (1992) and the François Laudet Big Band (from 1993). A capable scat singer, Bacqueville is an accomplished trombonist who was influenced mainly by Vic Dickenson.

R. Fonsèque: “Portrait,” Jazz Dixie/Swing: du Ragtime au Big Band, no.9 (1995), 12...

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Barry Kernfeld

(b 1955). Polish singer. He led small groups, appeared as a soloist with such musicians as Billy Hart, Klaus Ignatzek, Jean-Louis Rassinfosse, Zbigniew Namysłowski, and Sławomir Kulpowicz, and formed the group Cantabile in Jazz, consisting of singers (including Urszula Dudziak, Michele Hendricks, and Judy Niemack) and bass (either double bass or electric bass guitar). In the late 1990s his cooperative group Triology, with Art Lande and the flutist Günter Wehinger, toured, broadcast, and recorded in Poland (the album Triology, 1997, Gowi 49), and in 1999 it performed in the USA. Bałata also took a featured role in a musical, The Magician of Lublin. He is a scat singer and vocalizer in various styles, including bop, blues, romantic music, contemporary art music, and Polish folkloric traditions, and he is particularly skilled at imitating the sounds of instruments. A graphic designer, he has created performances integrating jazz with drawing and video projections....

Article

Michel Laplace

(b Loda, nr Lantosque, France, March 1, 1917; d Monaco, July 13, 1995). French trumpeter, singer, and bandleader. He was largely self-taught as a musician. He went to Paris in January 1940 and played with the bandleader and saxophonist Raymond Legrand (1940), Fred Adison’s band, the pianist Raymond Wraskoff (1940–41), Hubert Rostaing (1940–41), Alix Combelle’s group the Jazz de Paris (1940–41), Maceo Jefferson, and André Ekyan (1941). In 1943–5 he performed and recorded as the leader of a successful group consisting of a trumpet, five saxophones, and a rhythm section; Dizzy Gillespie was a guest soloist with the band in 1948. Barelli recorded in jam sessions with Charlie Parker and Sidney Bechet (1949), and Django Reinhardt (1952), and from 1966 worked as a bandleader in Monte Carlo. Influenced by Louis Armstrong, Harry James, and Gillespie, Barelli was the most technically proficient French trumpeter; his performance on ...

Article

Wim van Eyle

[Pieternella ]

(b The Hague, Sept 18, 1925). Dutch pianist and singer. She is self-taught as a musician. She sang with a Hawaiian vocal group, the Samoa Girls (1939–42), sang and played piano with the Dutch group the Miller Sextet (1944–9), and appeared in shows sponsored by the USO. From 1949 she led a trio and worked as a soloist, and between 1952 and 1967 she made several visits to the USA (approximately at yearly intervals) during which she performed in Hollywood and at Birdland in New York; she also took Eddie de Haas and Wallace Bishop for an engagement in the South in 1957, but racist conditions prevented Bishop from working – he returned to the Netherlands and Al Levitt took his place. Beck operated a club in Torremolinos, Spain, from 1965. In the 1980s she returned to the Netherlands, where she has worked mainly with her trio, with Koos Serierse, George van Deyl, or Henk Haverhoek on double bass, and Kees Kranenburg, Huub Janssen, or Roberto Haliffi on drums. She made a number of recordings, of which ...

Article

Adam Cegielski and Barry Kernfeld

(b Warsaw, Feb 23, 1951). Polish singer. In 1969 she began her career with the Grupa Bluesowa Stodoła, which performed the following year at the festival Jazz on the Odra; during the same period she also sang with Zbigniew Seifert. With her brother, the drummer Aleksander Bem, and the pianist and keyboard player Andrzej Ibek she founded the ensemble Bemibek, which appeared at the Jazz Jamboree in 1971, made numerous tours of Poland and elsewhere in Europe, and broadcast on radio; after some changes in membership the group continued as Bemibem from 1974 to 1977, during which time Bem began to work as a soloist. She sang with Jan Jarczyk (1974) and in Jan Wróblewski and Wojciech Karolak’s group Mainstream (1975). Later she recorded with the group Swing Session (1981), made an album of childrens’ songs (1990), worked with the groups Quintessence (...

Article

Otto Flückiger

(b Berne, Jan 11, 1912; d Zurich, Nov 28, 1999). Swiss double bass player, singer, and bandleader. In 1935 he joined the Dutch band the Harlem Kiddies, with which he toured Europe until 1939, and in 1937 he recorded I’m in the mood for love in a trio with Coleman Hawkins (first issued on the album 1935–1965: 30 Jahre Jazz Made in Switzerland, 1935–65, EMI 13C152-33894–5). Bertschy married the Dutch singer Kitty Ramon, who sang in his group the Swing Kiddies. During the war he served in the Swiss Army; he also performed and recorded (1941) with Teddy Stauffer’s Original Teddies. After a period with the Lanigiros (1942–6), with which he recorded My Melancholy Baby (1942, Col. ZZ1104), he formed the Continentals, a ten-piece ensemble with which he toured Europe until it disbanded in 1963; the group’s recordings include the album Undecided (...

Article

Erik van den Berg

[Grietje Henny ]

(b Stiens, Netherlands, April 22, 1956). Dutch singer. She first performed with the pianist Harry de Wit in 1979. The following year she joined the free-funk ensemble Noodband led by the saxophonist Alan Laurillard, and in 1984 she and Laurillard formed a quintet. She toured with her own quintet in 1988. In 1992, in collaboration with the composer and pianist Louis Andriessen, Bijma gave a performance of Nadir & Zenith at a concert which was broadcast on radio. Although she developed a preference for solo concerts, she also performed with the Willem Breuker Kollektief, with David Moss’s vocal quintet Direct Sound (touring in 1989 and recording in 1990), in a trio with Marilyn Crispell and Mark Dresser, and in the cooperative trio Freezing Screens with Jasper van ’t Hof and Pierre Favre (from 1994). Self-taught, Bijma applies unusual and extreme vocal techniques in improvised and sometimes startlingly theatrical contexts. In ...

Article

Gerhard Conrad

(b Dessau, Germany, Feb 15, 1920; d Selm, nr Lünen, Germany, Dec 14, 1993). German pianist and blues singer. At the age of five he studied piano with his mother and three years later he began to collect jazz records. He was involved with the Hot Club Berlin in 1934 and during World War II was denounced for listening to jazz and sent to a work camp. After the war he went to Frankfurt am Main, where, with the drummer Horst Lippmann, he founded the Two Beat Stompers in 1949. He issued the first German jazz magazine, Jazz Home, and wrote for Blues on Monday. In 1958 Boas went to Dortmund and then to Iserlohn, becoming active in local jazz clubs in both cities, and in Iserlohn he organized an effort to secure a gravestone for Mamie Smith. He then moved to Lünen, where he promoted concerts – as he had done in Iserlohn. Throughout these years he played with his own groups; in ...

Article

Mark Gilbert

[John Symon Asher ]

(b Bishopbriggs, Scotland, May 14, 1943; d Suffolk, October 25, 2014). Scottish bass player, singer, and composer. Having studied for three months at the Royal Scottish Academy of Music and Drama in Glasgow he moved to London, where he played with Alexis Korner’s Blues Incorporated (late 1962 – early 1963) and then formed a group with Graham Bond, John McLaughlin, and the drummer Ginger Baker; this became known as the Graham Bond Organisation after McLaughlin left and Dick Heckstall-Smith joined. Bruce arrived in London as a jazz purist and had at first played double bass, but after using an electric bass guitar for a recording session with Ernest Ranglin in 1964 he transferred to that instrument and studied the mobile, melodic style of the Motown house bass player James Jamerson. The following year Bruce left Bond’s band because Baker felt that his bass playing was too busy and joined John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. He is best known as the bass guitarist, singer, and principal composer with the highly successful blues and rock group Cream (...

Article

Wolfram Knauer

(b Leipzig, Germany, March 4, 1947). German singer. After first playing guitar and double bass she took up singing at a conservatory in Berlin (1969–74). Her influences were mainly American jazz, soul, and gospel singers. She performed with the trumpeter and bandleader Klaus Lenz (1969–77), the European Jazz Ensemble (1984–90), and the RIAS Big Band Berlin (1982–88). From 1974 she also led her own group, Uschi Brüning & Co. Even before the fall of the Berlin wall she was collaborating with such musicians from Western countries as George Gruntz, Eberhard Weber, and Herb Geller. Brüning, who was one of the most prominent jazz singers in the former East Germany, established a musical style somewhere between blues, jazz, and free-improvised music. While she recorded jazz standards and German-language chansons, she was deeply influenced by the instrumentalists with whom she worked, and her individual approach to scat singing has been particularly effective in her collaborations with her husband Ernst-Ludwig Petrowsky (from ...

Article

Clarrie Henley

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(Audrey )

(b Norwich, England, May 11, 1920; d London, July 14, 1998). English singer. When asked for her date of birth for the first edition of this dictionary, she replied, “Oh, I suppose I’d better give you the usual one”: her year of birth thus appeared as 1926, but both Carr, Fairweather, and Priestley (1995) and Chilton (1997) give 1920, which explains her otherwise precocious early activities. Soon after leaving school she organized jazz clubs in Norwich (1939) and Cambridge (1942), then in 1945 moved to London. She began singing part-time, working with the bands of George Webb (from summer 1945), Freddy Randall (1948–1950s), Cy Laurie, Chris Barber, and others. In 1952 she met Maxim Saury, and with his assistance she began a career as a full-time musician. She worked at clubs in Paris during the summer of ...

Article

Mark Gilbert

(Crichton Mackinnon )

(b Derby, England, Sept 10, 1939; d London, May 30, 2008). English trombonist and singer. He was introduced to New Orleans jazz and skiffle at the age of 15 by a classmate, the clarinetist Chris Blount, with whom he played washboard. When he was 19 he emigrated to New Zealand, took up trombone, and worked with the Omega Jazz Band (1960–62). He then moved to Australia and performed with the Hot Sands Jazz Band (1962–4) and Geoff Bull’s Olympia Jazz Band (1964–5). In 1965 he returned to the UK via New Orleans, where he played at Preservation Hall. From autumn that year until the middle of the next he collaborated with Terry Lightfoot; he then joined Monty Sunshine before returning to Australia in December 1966. However, from summer 1969 he was a permanent resident in London. He worked with the pianist Ian Armit (late ...

Article

Wim van Eyle

(b Amsterdam, March 4, 1933; d Amsterdam, November 29, 1989). Dutch singer. She was self-taught as a musician. She began her career in 1955, having been encouraged to do so by Eddie de Haas, and toured Germany with the double bass player Ted Powder. She played with Pia Beck (1958) and Piet Noordijk (in Morocco and Spain, 1960) and in the early 1960s worked regularly in The Hague. In 1965 she played with the pianist Frans Elsen and made the first of several fine recordings; she sang at the festival in Sopot, Poland, in 1966. In 1968 Burton made the first of several tours of Japan; she made a number of recordings in Tokyo from 1973 into the early 1980s, and became one of the most popular jazz singers there, being placed high in Japanese jazz fan polls and receiving an award in 1977. She also recorded in New York in ...