1-20 of 20 results  for:

  • Music Educator x
Clear all

Article

Michel Laplace

(b Mercatello, Italy, April 1, 1921; d nr Paris, 1980). French drummer and teacher. He studied music under the trumpeter and conductor Georges Prêtre and the bassoonist Maurice Allard and at the conservatory in Douai under Jack Diéval. He began to play at the Cambrai Hot Club, then as a professional in Lille with Benny Vasseur and the saxophonist Georges Grenu. In ...

Article

Eric Thacker

(b Prague, 1934). Czech double bass player. He first studied violin and trombone (1945–52), then double bass and theory (1957). In the early to mid-1960s he recorded many albums in Prague with Zdenek Bartak’s big band, Karel Vlach (1962–3), Karel Velebný’s quartet and quintet (1962–5), Jan Konopasek (1963), and the pianist Milan Dvořák (1964); in 1965 he toured and recorded with the Reduta Quintet. In West Germany and France he played with Leo Wright and Booker Ervin. He moved in 1966 to the USA, where he worked as a producer, arranger, conductor, and performer; he played with Elvin Jones, Tony Scott, Howard McGhee, and Attila Zoller, and recorded with Sonny Stitt (1966), Chico Hamilton (c1967, c1974), and Ervin (1968). As a member of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers (...

Article

Leonard Bernardo

(Andrejevich )

(b Novosibirsk, Russian SFSR [now Russia], March 16, 1947). Russian drummer, writer, broadcaster, and educator. He began playing jazz in 1962, and after graduating from the state medical institute in Novosibirsk in 1971 he pursued a dual career as a jazz musician and an obstetrician. In 1975 he established Tvorcheskoye Dhazovoye Ob’yedinenie (Creative Jazz Unity), the first association of musicians and jazz promoters east of the Urals. He performed with Vladimir Tolkachev in the Musical Improvising Trio (1975–9), with Igor Dmitriev in various groups (including, from 1977, Zolotoye Gody Dhaza (Golden Jazz Years), with Vytautas Labutis in the quartet SibLitMash (Siberian-Lithuanian Jazz Machine, 1980s), and with Vagif Sadykhov in another quartet (1998), while also working as a freelance with Vladimir Chekasin, Anatoly Vapirov, Igor Butman, Joe Locke, Paul Bollenback, and former members of Art Blakey’s Jazz Messengers, among others. In 1990 he began to broadcast on radio, and in ...

Article

Barry Kernfeld

(b Heidelberg, Germany, March 30, 1935). German vibraphonist and teacher. He studied classical piano from the age of ten. As the house pianist for jam sessions at the Club 54 in Heidelberg, he learned to play bop in the company of such visiting American servicemen as Leo Wright, Cedar Walton, Lex Humphries, and Don Ellis; he also took up vibraphone and became interested in free jazz. Following studies in musicology and philosophy in Heidelberg and Berlin (PhD 1963) he joined Don Cherry’s free-jazz quintet, then based in Paris (1965); during this period he appeared in Appunti per un film sul jazz (Notes for a Film on Jazz) (1965). When Cherry’s group recorded in New York in September 1966 Berger remained in the USA, performing in schools for Young Audiences, Inc., with Horacee Arnold’s group (1967–71), periodically touring with his own bands, of which Carlos Ward, Dave Holland, and Ed Blackwell were members, and playing alongside Ward in a group led by David Izenzon. In autumn ...

Article

Walter Ojakäär

(Mikhaylovich )

(b Moscow, June 9, 1944). Russian pianist, teacher, and composer. From 1962 to 1966 he led a trio at the Vserossiyskoye Gastrol’no-kontsertnoye Ob’yedinenie (All-Russian society for guest performances). He played with Aleksey Kozlov in the big band VIO-66 (the Vocal Instrumental Orchestra, directed by the composer Yuri Saulsky) and also in a quartet drawn from the band which recorded at a festival in Moscow in 1967. Thereafter he worked in a duo with German Luk’yanov (1969–70) and led various groups ranging in size from quartet to sextet (1969–91); these groups made several recordings, among them Pered zakhodom solntsa (1985, Mel. C60 21873003) and Live at the Village Gate (1988, Mobile Fidelity 861). Bril performed at festivals and concerts in Europe, Indonesia, Cuba, and the USA. From 1991 he led the group New Generation, which included his twin sons, the saxophonists Dmitry and Alexander (...

Article

Stan Britt

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(b Dumfries, Scotland, April 21, 1933; d London, Feb 25, 2009). English trumpeter, flugelhorn player, bandleader, composer, writer, and teacher, brother of Mike Carr. His mother played ukulele and banjo. Carr grew up in northeast England, where he took piano lessons from the age of 12 and taught himself trumpet from 1950. After studying at King’s College, Newcastle upon Tyne (1952–60, degree, English literature, diploma, education) he served in the army (1956–8), then played with his brother in a band, the Emcee Five (1960 – August 1962). He briefly joined Don Rendell in November 1962 and, after recovering from illness, formed a long-lived quintet with Rendell from 1963 to July 1969; during this period he also worked with Joe Harriott (recording in 1969), Don Byas, and John McLaughlin. In September 1969 he formed his own band, Nucleus, which rapidly became recognized internationally for its experiments with jazz-rock. As a result of its performance at the Montreux International Jazz Festival in ...

Article

Géza Gábor Simon

[Gárdonyi, László ]

(b Budapest, July 3, 1956). Hungarian pianist, composer, and teacher. He studied classical music, jazz, and ethnic music at the Béla Bartók Musical Training College in Budapest between 1976 and 1979 and first recorded with Zbigniew Namysłowski in 1983. From 1983 to 1985 he attended the Berklee College of Music in Boston; as a member of the quartet Forward Motion with Tommy Smith, Terje Gewelt, and Ian Froman, he recorded at the college in 1984 and in Oslo in 1985. Gardony won first prize at the Great American Piano Competition in 1987 and joined the Berklee faculty that same year. He has toured extensively in North America and Europe, performing at major festivals and concert series, and he has played with such musicians as Dave Liebman, Miroslav Vitous, John Abercrombie, Mick Goodrick, Garrison Fewell, Phil Wilson, Tony Lakatos, and the percussionist George Jinda. A video clip from his unaccompanied solo concert in Budapest in ...

Article

Walter Ojakäär

(L’vovich )

(b Moscow, Jan 25, 1938). Russian reed player, composer, and teacher. He studied clarinet at a music school in Leningrad (graduating in 1956) but taught himself to play saxophone and flute. From 1953 to 1955 he worked with the accordionist and saxophonist Stanislav Pozhlakov, and in 1957 he formed a sextet that included the violinist Arkady Liskovich, the tenor saxophonist Valery Milevsky, and the pianist Teimuraz Kukholev. The sextet was enlarged soon afterwards and in 1958 formed the basis of an orchestra led by Yosif Vainstein, for whom Golstain played lead alto saxophone, served as principal soloist, and wrote arrangements; at the same time he led a quintet with Konstantin Nosov consisting of members of Vainstein’s orchestra. Later he toured with a big band led by Ady Rosner (1966–7), played under the bandleader Vadim Ludvikovsky in the orchestra of Vsesoyuznoye Radio (All-union radio) (1968–73...

Article

Robert Gannon

(b Pontypridd, Wales, Feb 24, 1928). Welsh writer and broadcaster. He began writing on jazz in about 1950 and contributed articles, discographies, and reviews to Melody Maker (from 1951), Jazz Journal (1951–5), and Jazz Monthly (1955–71). He has also furnished liner notes for about 2000 albums and has written, collaborated on, or contributed to some dozen books; Modern Jazz (1956) is looked upon as the first thorough survey of bop published in the UK. Morgan has provided scripts for radio and television and from 1954 worked regularly for the BBC. He has also lectured on jazz and from 1969 has written a weekly jazz column for the Kent Evening Post.

(selective list)

with R. Horricks: Modern Jazz: a Survey of Developments since 1939 (London, 1956/R1977) with R. Horricks: Gerry Mulligan: a Biography, Appreciation, Record Survey and Discography (London, 1958)...

Article

Barry Kernfeld

(b Wrocław, Poland, Feb 20, 1963). Polish double bass player. After working in Poland with Jan Wróblewski, Zbigniew Namysłowski, and Tomasz Szukalski he moved in 1988 to Los Angeles, where his surname came to be known in abbreviated form, as Oles. He studied from 1989 at the California Institute of the Arts and remained there as a faculty member after graduating in 1992. The following year he became a founding member of a cooperative group, the L.A. Jazz Quartet, which mainly performed locally but toured France in 1998. He also joined James Newton’s quartet and groups led by Kei Akagi and by the drummer Gerry Gibbs. As a freelance Oleszkiewicz appeared in the studio, in concert, and at clubs with such musicians as Joe Lovano, Bennie Maupin, Ravi Coltrane, Scott Hamilton, Marcus Printup, Brian Lynch, Tim Hagans, Art Farmer, Arturo Sandoval, Billy Childs, Joe LaBarbera, Larance Marable, Terri Lyne Carrington, and Albert “Tootie” Heath; he was reunited with Wróblewski for a performance in West Hollywood in ...

Article

Robert Pernet

[Jean ]

(b Nivelles, Belgium, March 8, 1903; d Brussels, Jan 13, 1983). Belgian pianist. A classically trained musician, he moved in August 1925 to New York and for about four months played organ at the Strand Palace. On his return to Belgium he gave the first performance in the country of George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue (18 Nov 1927), worked with the group Bistrouille ADO, and lectured on jazz. From 1928 he toured the Netherlands, Switzerland, Italy, and Egypt, and, as a member of the band led by the violinist Marek Weber, Hungary, Switzerland, and Germany; he also arranged film music. After making his first recording, with Gus Deloof in 1931, he worked in 1934 with Robert De Kers in Antwerp and in the same year performed with Stan Brenders. While playing in Brenders’s big band (1936–44) he toured with Jean Omer (1941). In the following years he took part in concerts of music for two pianos and four pianos (with, among others, Johnny Jack and Egide Van Gils), worked with Fud Candrix (...

Article

Philip Greene

(Henry, Jr. )

(b Sheffield, AL, Sept 1, 1931). American double bass and french horn player, and teacher. He learned french horn in the army, and played in bands at the Lockbourne (Ohio) Air Force Base, where in 1947 he met Dwike Mitchell. He continued to study orchestral horn, and was also a pupil of the composer Paul Hindemith at Yale University (MA 1954). He then joined Lionel Hampton’s band, with which Mitchell was already playing, and in 1955 the two musicians formed a duo. They have lectured and performed throughout the USA, and in 1959, on tour with the Yale Russian Chorus, they were the first Western jazz musicians to perform in the USSR after World War II. In 1966 they accompanied President Lyndon Johnson to Mexico, and the following year they made a film in Brazil which traced the African roots of Brazilian music. They appear with Dizzy Gillespie in the film documentary ...

Article

Alfredo Papo

[Pedro ]

(b Valencia, Spain, July 23, 1962). Spanish tenor saxophonist. He learned piano from the age of six but taught himself to play tenor saxophone, which he took up in 1978. In 1982 he moved to Barcelona, and while serving on the faculty of the Taller de Músics (a school dedicated to jazz and popular music) studied flute at the Barcelona conservatory; he continued his studies at the New School in 1991. In New York he played with Lee Konitz, Jimmy Cobb, Joe Chambers, and others. He has appeared throughout Spain and also toured extensively, having performed in England, Portugal, Angola, Argentina, Mexico, and France. He recorded as a leader with such sidemen as Wallace Roney, Tete Montoliu, David Kikoski, the singer Enrique Morente, and Brad Mehldau, and has also recorded as a sideman with Montoliu, Benny Golson, Paquito D’Rivera, and Curtis Fuller.

Article

Adam Cegielski and Barry Kernfeld

(b Wrocław, Poland, Dec 7, 1963). Polish pianist and educator. From 1985 to 1987 he was a member of Zbigniew Namysłowski’s group, and around the same time he worked in Jan Wróblewski’s band. After gaining a degree in piano performance at the Berklee College of Music (1990) he joined the Artie Shaw Orchestra under Dick Johnson (1990). Back in Poland he taught at an annual jazz workshop in Pulawy from 1991 to 1997, and in 1993 he joined the faculty of the Hochschule für Musik und Darstellende Kunst in Graz, Austria. He led his own quartet (1993–6), with Henryk Miśkiewicz, the double bass player Adam Cegielski, and the drummer Cezary Konrad as his sidemen, which recorded the album Northern Song (1993, Gowi 09), and joined the Traveling Birds Quintet (1994), alongside Piotr Baron, Piotr Wojtasik, Darek Oleszkiewicz, and Konrad, whose albums include ...

Article

Erik Kjellberg

revised by Gary W. Kennedy

(Eilert )

(b Jönköping, Sweden, June 9, 1938; d Stockholm, May 18, 1990). Swedish trombonist. He worked with dixieland groups while in his early teens, then played bop in Sweden with the drummer Joe Harris (1958–9) and Putte Wickman (1959–60), and led a quintet that won acclaim in Europe (1961–5). In the mid-1960s he played with George Russell and led a quartet with Barney Wilen, and in 1967 he joined the faculty of the Musikakademie in Graz, Austria; at the same time he performed and recorded with many European free-jazz musicians, notably Joachim Kühn, with whom he led groups. In 1970 he was named “new star” on the trombone by Down Beat. After returning to Sweden in 1972 Thelin continued to work as a leader until 1980, after which he was mainly active as a composer and occasional guest soloist with various ensembles. He appeared with George Gruntz’s Concert Jazz Band, worked in the European Jazz Ensemble, and formed the group E.T. Project (...

Article

Sally-Ann Worsfold

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(Ramsey )

(b London, May 12, 1941). English drummer and educator. His surname was misspelled Tompkins in the first edition of this dictionary. He began listening to jazz at the age of 13 on Voice of America broadcasts. After playing trombone he took up drums and at first played mostly commercially oriented music, working with jazz groups only informally. He was initially self-taught, but later studied harmony, theory, and orchestral percussion at the Blackheath Conservatory of Music and the Guildhall School of Music. Late in 1962 he became a full-time jazz musician when he joined Don Rendell; he was then a member of the quintet led by Rendell and Ian Carr (1963–9), and he may be heard to advantage with this ensemble on Tan san fu, from the album Dusk Fire (1966, Col. ESX6064). During the same period he played on the transatlantic liner Queen Elizabeth and worked with Neil Ardley’s New Jazz Orchestra and with lesser-known bands. He performed and recorded with Michael Garrick from ...

Article

David G. Such

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(Lacy )

(b Cadiz, KY, July 20, 1941; d Toulon, France, June 27, 1992). Baritone and alto saxophonist and teacher. He studied piano, clarinet, and alto saxophone as a youth, and after entering military service in 1958 played baritone saxophone in an army band. He moved in 1960 to Cleveland, where he performed with Albert Ayler, then to New York, where he became involved in free jazz and performed and recorded with Ayler; he was the most constant member of the tenor saxophonist’s groups from 1963 to 1966. In 1967–8 he studied with David Baker at Indiana University. He spent the latter half of 1969 touring in a rock group, while based in Denver, and then moved to California and worked in the Los Angeles area. Having moved north to secure a teaching certificate at the University of California, Berkeley, he taught music in Oakland at North Peralta Community College and Mills College (...

Article

Barry Kernfeld

(Ladislav )

(b Prague, Dec 6, 1947). Czech double bass player. He learned violin and piano before taking up double bass and, while studying at the Prague Conservatory, won a scholarship to the Berklee School of Music (1966). In 1967 he moved to New York, where he played with Art Farmer, Freddie Hubbard, the quintet led by Bob Brookmeyer and Clark Terry, and Miles Davis, then worked with Herbie Mann (1968–70); he also recorded with Donald Byrd (1967), Chick Corea and Jack DeJohnette (both 1968), Wayne Shorter (1969), and Larry Coryell (1970). In 1970 he toured with Stan Getz, rejoined Mann, and, with Shorter and Joe Zawinul, was a founding member of Weather Report (jazz). Vitous left the group in 1973 and spent several years experimenting with electric bass guitars. After he resumed playing double bass he joined the faculty of the New England Conservatory (...

Article

Robert Gannon

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(b Harrogate, England, Dec 7, 1941). English writer and photographer. She wrote about jazz from the age of 18 and in 1959–60 studied photography in London. During the following decades she contributed hundreds of articles to Melody Maker (1960–1970s), Down Beat (of which she was the British correspondent from 1966 to 1970), Jazz Journal, Jazz Monthly, Crescendo, Jazz magazine, Musica jazz, Swing Journal, Jazz Forum, The Wire, and many other periodicals and national newspapers. She also provided the photographs used to illustrate several books as well as those used in John Jeremy’s film Jazz is our Religion (1972). Wilmer has written extensively on the contribution of black British musicians, lectured and chaired forums in this area, and conducted interviews of numerous women and black British musicians for the oral history collection at the National Sound Archive of the British Library. Her own books include ...

Article

Adam Cegielski and Barry Kernfeld

(b Wrocław, Poland, June 10, 1964). Polish trumpeter and flugelhorn player. He studied jazz at the academy of music in Katowice and joined its faculty after graduating in 1987; from that same year into the mid-1990s he made many recordings as a member of Krzysztof Popek’s ensemble Young Power. In 1988 Wojtasik gave a successful performance at the Jazz Jamboree in Warsaw as a member of the group New Presentation. From 1992 to 1995 he was a member of Jan Wróblewski’s group Made in Poland, and in 1994 he formed the Traveling Birds Quintet, with Piotr Baron, Kuba Stankiewicz, Darek Oleszkiewicz, and the drummer Cezary Konrad. From 1996 he has led his own quintet, of which Maciej Sikała is a member. He has organized special groups for tours and recordings with Gary Bartz, Billy Harper, Buster Williams, Ben Riley, and Ed Schuller, among others; the sidemen on his album ...