1-20 of 117 results  for:

  • 15th c./Early Renaissance (1400-1500) x
Clear all

Article

Bonnie J. Blackburn

(b Florence, c1480; d after 1545). Italian theorist and composer. Nothing is known of Aaron's early training, his teacher, or his career before 1516. He claims to have had ‘the greatest friendship and familiarity’ with Josquin, Obrecht, Isaac and Agricola in Florence (most likely between ...

Article

Owen Wright

(b Maragh; d Herat, 1435). Timurid composer, performer and theorist. He first rose to prominence in the service of the Jalā’irid rulers of Iraq and Azerbaijan, al-Ḥusayn (1374–82) and Aḥmad (1382–1410). After the conquest of Baghdad by Tīmūr (...

Article

(b Lisbon, 1437; d Venice, 1508). Philosopher and biblical exegete. His writing on music forms the introduction to his commentary on Exodus xv (the ‘Song of the Sea’, 1505; I-Rvat Rossiano 925, also printed in Venice in 1579). Relying on earlier sources including Ibn Rushd's commentary on Aristotle's ...

Article

Lewis Lockwood

(b Groningen, 1443; d Heidelberg, Oct 28, 1485). German humanist and philosopher who was also active as a musician. His early studies took place in Groningen, but in the late 1460s he travelled to Italy for further humanistic training. In 1468 he was at the University of Pavia, where he studied jurisprudence for several years. Later he transferred to Ferrara, where he studied Greek at the ...

Article

Charles E. Brewer

(b Genoa, Feb 14, 1404; d Rome, April 3, 1472). Italian humanist, architect and writer. His formal studies began at the gymnasium of Gasparino Barzizza at Padua, where he became friends with Tommaso Parentucelli (later Pope Nicholas V). He went to Bologna, probably in ...

Article

(b c1435; d after 1504). Italian philosopher and biblical exegete. He wrote briefly on music in his Ḥesheq shelomoh (‘Solomon's desire’), a commentary on the Song of Solomon, written during the period 1488–92 at the request of Giovanni Pico della Mirandola. Music is discussed in relation to Hebrew poetics, then classified for its varieties and described for its powers. Under poetics, Alemanno notes that the word ...

Article

Cecil Adkins

Reviser Bonnie J. Blackburn

(b Parma, before 1386; d c1440–43). Italian scholar and theorist. His many works, covering topics such as astronomy, astrology and medicine, also include a treatise De musica, notable for its influence on Gaffurius. He studied as a youth in Pavia and in about 1428 practised medicine in Ferrara, each time returning to Parma, where he was a member of a distinguished family.

The only remaining copy of Anselmi's treatise is Gaffurius’s well-glossed mid-century exemplar ( I-Ma H 233 Inf.). Written in April 1434, the work was purportedly the record of conversations between Anselmi and Pietro dei Rossi which took place in September 1433 at the Bagni di Corsena (now Bagni di Lucca). The treatise presents in dialogue form the topics of harmonia celestis, harmonia instrumentalis and harmonia cantabilis; each part represents one day’s conversation. The influence of the medieval tripartite division is apparent, and although he did not disagree with the main ideas, Anselmi did not accept certain details of the Boethian doctrines (e.g. the division of the tone)....

Article

F. Alberto Gallo and Andreas Bücker

(b ?Leno, nr Brescia; fl 1st half of the 15th century). Italian ?theorist. An incomplete treatise on music, in Italian, found in a manuscript of the second half of the 15th century ( I-Vnm Lat.336, coll.1581, 50v–64r), contains musical examples attributed to ‘Antonius de Leno musichus’; it is uncertain, however, whether the text of the treatise can safely be attributed to him. Only three sections survive: the first, on mutations, may have been the final part of a larger section on ...

Article

Beatrice Pescerelli

(fl 15th century). Italian theorist. He was a Servite friar and pupil of one Laurentius of Orvieto, a canon of S Maria Maggiore. His treatise Ars cantus figurati (CoussemakerS, iv, 421–33) is a compilation on musica mensurabilis according to the theories of Johannes de Muris; it deals with ligatures, alterations, proportions and prolations, giving diagrams and music examples. The work is discussed in A.M. Busse Berger: ...

Article

Don Harrán

(b Spain, c1420; d Naples, 1494). Rabbi and philosopher. Following the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492, he settled in Naples. He referred to music under the heading nigun ‘olam (‘cosmic music’) in chapter 12 of his ‘Aqedat Yits ḥaq...

Article

Ingrid Brainard

(b Solliès, [now Solliès-Pont, Var], late 15th century; d Saint Rémy, Bouches du Rhône, or Solliès, after 1543). French dance theorist and man of letters. In 1519 he began to study law at the University of Avignon, after completing his studies he joined the French troops that invaded Italy. Late in ...

Article

John Koster

(b Zwolle, late 14th or early 15th century; d Paris, Sept 6, 1466). Franco-Flemish physician, astrologer, astronomer and author of a treatise on musical instruments, of which he was presumably also a maker. Even if he did not, as has been assumed, study at the University of Paris, he would have become familiar with much of its curriculum through Jean Fusoris, whom Arnaut called his master. Fusoris, who had received degrees in theology, arts and medicine at the University, was a physician, astrologer, astronomer and prolific maker of astronomical and horological devices. By ...

Article

Christopher Page

(fl c1400). Writer on music. He was presumably from St Ghislain in Hainaut and was possibly a member of its Benedictine community. One work by him is known, the Tractatulus de differentiis et gradibus cantorum, found only in St Paul im Lavanttal (...

Article

(b ?Liegnitz [now Legnica], c1494; d after 1527). German theorist. The family residence in Liegnitz is documented from 1381, but the name is absent from the town records begun in 1546. Bogentantz attended the Gymnasium in Goldberg, and in 1508 he matriculated in the faculty of arts of Cologne University, where he may have been the pupil of Cochlaeus and fellow student of Glarean. In ...

Article

Bonnie J. Blackburn

(fl ? c1450). Italian theorist. He is the otherwise unknown author (possibly from Bizzolano, a quarter of Canneto sull’Oglio west of Mantua) of a short treatise for boys, Introductiones artis musice (incomplete in I-Vnm lat.Cl.VIII.85 (3579), ff.61 v–67 v, copied in Mantua and Bozzolo in ...

Article

Heinrich Hüschen

(b Waischenfeld, c1484). German music theorist and theologian. He attended the cathedral school in Bamberg and in 1500 entered Leipzig University where he became Bachelor of Arts in 1507, Master of Arts in 1511 and from 1513 until 1515 taught as Master of Law. In ...

Article

Clement A. Miller

Reviser Bonnie J. Blackburn

[Nicolaus]

(b Parma, c1453; d Parma, Aug 1528). Italian music theorist, poet and chronicler. He was a member of a noble Parmesan family and was destined for the religious life. During the course of his seminary training he studied music with the well-known theorist Johannes Gallicus. He was ordained as sub-deacon on 28 March 1472 and promoted to priest by 1478. He then began to study canon law at Bologna, where he seems to have enjoyed the patronage of the powerful Bentivoglio family. When Annibale Bentivoglio married Lucrezia, daughter of Ercole d’Este, in 1486, Burzio celebrated the event in verse: his Musarum nympharumque is dedicated to Antongaleazzo Bentivoglio. By 1498 Burzio had returned to Parma and by 1503 he held benefices in two Benedictine monasteries. In December 1504 he was named guardacoro at Parma Cathedral, a post he held until his death.

Although Burzio was active as a poet and historian of Bologna and Parma (on these works, see Rizzi), his most significant work is the ...

Article

Barbara H. Haggh

( b Cambrai, c 1400; d Paris, Nov 23, 1472). French theologian, theorist and poet . After studying and teaching in Paris until 1432, he acquired a reputation at the Council of Basle for his disputations with the Hussites. The council deputed him to Bohemia in ...

Article

Gilbert Reaney

[Philipoctus, Filipoctus]

( fl c1370). Theorist and composer. He was active in Avignon c1370, and his residence at the Papal court there is confirmed by his ballade Par les bons Gedeons which pays homage to the antipope Clement VII (1378–94). The extent of his theoretical writing is disputed. Arlt has argued that the ascription of the Tractatus figurarum (or Tractatus de diversis figuris) to Egidius de Murino is incorrect; it also survives with ascriptions to Philippus de Caserta ( I-FZc ) and Magister Phillipotus Andreas ( US-Cn ). The doubtful suggestion by Strohm (following Pirrotta) that the two are identical is supported by the association of Caserta with the Visconti court of Pavia, where the latter manuscript was copied. If this is correct, there are five treatises that survive with dubious ascriptions to Caserta. (Four of these treatises occur in a manuscript from the second half of the 15th century. This source is closely associated with John Hothby's teaching.)...

Article

Bonnie J. Blackburn

(fl 1492). Italian theorist. A pupil of Franchinus Gaffurius, he is the nominal author of Tractato vulgare de canto figurato (Milan, 1492; facs., with Ger. trans. by J. Wolf, Veröffentlichungen der Musik-Bibliothek Paul Hirsch, ser.1, i, Berlin 1922). This treatise, dedicated by Gaffurius to Filippino Fiesco, is a greatly abbreviated translation of Gaffurius's ...