1-20 of 360 results  for:

  • Musical Concepts, Genres, and Terms x
  • Composer or Arranger x
  • Instrumentalist x
Clear all

Article

Lars Westin

(b Spånga, Sweden, April 18, 1945). Swedish trumpeter, composer, and leader. He started playing in amateur bands around Stockholm while in his teens and worked towards a career as a lawyer before becoming a full-time musician in 1972, upon the formation of the group Egba; he eventually became the leader of the band and the main contributor of compositions to its repertory. Egba’s music combined jazz-rock with African and Latin rhythms and melodies, though its last album (it disbanded in 1991) incorporates drum machines and other computerized elements. Adåker also worked with Johnny Dyani, the Stockholm-based orchestra Hot Salsa, and Radiojazzgruppen (ii), among others. From the early 1990s he has appeared as a jazz soloist in a variety of settings, often playing in the hard-bop tradition. His own groups have varied in size from quartet to octet (including a string section), and he has displayed great skill and imagination as a composer of works for Radiojazzgruppen (as heard on the album ...

Article

André Clergeat

(b Paris, Dec 7, 1968). French guitarist, leader, and composer. He studied guitar under the guidance of Philippe Petit and Marc Ducret and was influenced by the avant-garde musicians Derek Bailey and John Zorn. After having played alongside John Abercrombie, Tal Farlow, and Dave Liebman he abandoned bop, oriented himself “beyond” jazz, and adopted a violent “jungle style,” which had nothing to do with Duke Ellington’s aesthetic of the same name but borrowed instead mainly from electronics. In the early 1990s he founded the groups Unit (including Julien Lourau) and Trash Corporation (involving Bojan Zulfikarpasic), played in the cooperative Astrolab, and appeared frequently in Henri Texier’s group. Later he joined the groups Machination (alongside Hélène Labarrière), Tribulation, and the Recyclers, and led the ensemble M.A.O. Akchoté has taught at the Centre d’Information Musicale and at EDIM (Enseignement Diffusion Information Musique).

Article

Jacques Aboucaya

(Bothelo )

(b Rio de Janeiro, April 28, 1950). Brazilian double bass player, pianist, and composer. From 1964 he played piano in the trio Camara, and later made a tour of France, where he settled in 1973; he then changed from piano to double bass and also studied composition at the Paris Conservatoire. He formed a duo with the pianist Jean-Pierre Mas (1978), appeared in Martial Solal’s trio, and played in Eric Le Lann’s quartet (1982). Between 1982 and 1985 he was heard with Jean-Louis Chautemps, Philip Catherine, Joachim Kühn, Michel Portal, and the Americans Charlie Mariano, Joe Henderson, and Lee Konitz. In 1985 he resumed playing piano and formed the Cesarius Alvim Connection, with Jean-François Jenny-Clark on double bass and André Ceccarelli on drums. After a period of voluntary retirement from 1992 to 1997 (though he continued to make recordings) Alvim resumed working: he composed a piece for symphony orchestra, ...

Article

Jacques Aboucaya

(b Oran, Algeria, Oct 25, 1961). French pianist and composer. After taking lessons in classical piano he went to the USA to study at the Berklee College of Music (1981–3) and then at the Manhattan School of Music (MM composition). He appeared in the BMI Jazz Composition Workshop under the direction of Bob Brookmeyer (1984) and wrote for Mel Lewis’s orchestra. Based in New York from 1985, he worked in clubs with such musicians as Joshua Redman, Bobby Watson, Ernie Watts, and Sonny Fortune and toured Brazil with Gerry Mulligan’s quartet. In 1987 he formed a quartet with the saxophonist Tim Ries for a tour of Europe, and then in 1990 recorded his first album as a leader, with Gary Peacock and Bill Stewart as his sidemen. He composed for a Belgian chamber orchestra and for the Orchestre National de Jazz in Paris. Amsallem has continued to play with Ries, and in the course of working in both the USA and Europe he recorded with the saxophonist in a trio with Leon Parker (...

Article

Johs Bergh

(Syver )

(b Bergen, Norway, March 3, 1950). Norwegian pianist, composer, and arranger. He established himself as a talented player in local groups in the early 1970s. While leading his own group Ny Bris (1980–83) he also played in a Scandinavian jazz ensemble led by Carla Bley (1980) and with Thorgeir Stubø (1980–82). Having moved to Oslo in 1981, he worked with Knut Riisnaes (1981–5), led his own trio (from 1983), and toured Norway with Joe Henderson (1988). From 1988 he has lived partly in Bergen, partly in Oslo, leading his own groups in both cities and frequently accompanying visiting foreign soloists. He was the festival composer at Vossajazz (1987) and subsequently won national awards for a composition inspired by Edvard Grieg, Rusler rundt 152 (“Moving around 152” – 152 being a house number where Grieg once lived). An excellent soloist in a modern style inspired by the early playing of Keith Jarrett, Arnesen is also a creative composer, both in small- and large-group formats....

Article

Erik Kjellberg

revised by Lars Westin

(b Hälsingborg, Sweden, Aug 7, 1920; d Stockholm, Feb 11, 1971). Swedish bandleader, arranger, and saxophonist. He led a big band in Malmö (1942–9), was a member of Thore Ehrling’s orchestra in Stockholm (1949–52), and worked as a studio musician. From 1956 to 1965 he was the leader of Radiobandet (the Swedish Radio Big Band), which achieved considerable success in the USA. First presented there as the Jazztone Mystery Band (an invention of the writer George T. Simon), it was mistaken by several critics and well-known musicians for one of the leading American big bands, and it received considerable further acclaim through albums released under Arnold’s own name. The ensemble played in a modernized swing style and included such prominent Swedish and Norwegian musicians as Arne Domnérus, Bengt Hallberg, Bjarne Nerem, Åke Persson, Carl-Henrik Norin, Egil Johansson, and Georg Riedel. Benny Bailey, living in Sweden at that time, was also an intermittent member, and he recorded as a soloist with the group, as did Nat Adderley and Coleman Hawkins as guests (all on ...

Article

André Clergeat

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[Mr. Swing ]

(b Paris, April 16, 1931). French tenor saxophonist, clarinetist, pianist, composer, and leader. His father was a lyric singer, and he grew up in a musical family; he studied classical singing as a child and took up clarinet in 1950. After playing traditional jazz with Michel Attenoux (from 1952) and working with Bill Coleman, Peanuts Holland, Lil Armstrong, Sidney Bechet, and Jimmy Archey, he joined Claude Bolling’s trio (1955) and toured Europe, Africa, and the Middle East with Bolling and with Jazz aux Champs Elysées, led by Jack Diéval. From 1958 his principal instrument was the tenor saxophone, which he played for many years with Bolling and as a freelance in studios. He also worked with Roger Guérin and Geo Daly (both 1957), Alice Babs and Duke Ellington (1963), Jean-Claude Naude (1963–4), Cat Anderson (recording in 1965), Paul Gonsalves (...

Article

Frank Büchmann-Møller

(b Copenhagen, Feb 7, 1958). Danish pianist, keyboard player, saxophonist, and composer. He began to play professionally in 1978 and studied music education at the Royal Danish Academy of Music in Copenhagen in 1981. Besides leading his own quartet he worked in the groups Blast (1980–84), Santa Cruz (1980–85), Buzstop (1982–3), Hans Ulrik’s Fusion (recording in 1988), Det Glatte Lag, and Jazzgruppe 90 (recording in 1992), and recorded as the leader of a big band which included Randy Brecker and Bob Berg (1992). From the 1980s onwards he has composed and arranged for, and played in, numerous productions at recording studios, in theaters, on radio and on television, both in jazz and in other genres. Bak has taught from 1986 at Det Rytmiske Musikkonservatorium in Copenhagen.

Article

Johs Bergh

(b Hamar, Norway, June 7, 1955). Norwegian pianist, composer, and arranger. He grew up in Oslo and began his career in jazz-rock groups in the early 1970s. He then played with Arild Andersen (1974–6), Radka Toneff (1975–82), and the guitarist Jon Eberson (1978–9), among others, and internationally with the quintet Masqualero (1982–7). From 1990 he has performed all over Europe with the trumpeter Per Jørgensen and the drummer Audun Kleive in the free improvising trio Jøkleba. For the winter olympic games at Lillehammer, Norway, in 1994 he was commissioned to write Magnetic North for an 11-piece orchestra, and in 1995–6 he toured in Japan, the USA, and Europe with this band. Balke has also composed music for various theater productions and larger works for many Norwegian jazz festivals. A musician with a broad scope, he performs in a regular modern jazz style, in a completely free manner, and in styles influenced by different worldwide ethnic musics....

Article

Charles Fox and Digby Fairweather

(b Welwyn Garden City, April 17, 1930). English jazz trombonist, arranger and bandleader. He studied the trombone and the double bass at the GSM in London, and formed his first traditional jazz band in 1949. In 1953 he helped to organize a band that was led by Ken Colyer, at that time the most ardent British propagandist for traditional New Orleans music. The following year Barber took over the band; Colyer was replaced by Pat Halcox, and the ensemble soon became one of the most popular and technically accomplished groups of its kind. From the mid-1950s Barber helped foster British interest in blues by bringing over such American musicians as Muddy Waters, the harmonica player Sonny Terry and the guitarist and singer Brownie McGhee. He made several tours of the USA beginning in 1959, and also recorded two albums with his American Jazz Band, which included Sidney De Paris, Edmond Hall and Hank Duncan. Barber expanded his interests, recording classic rags (scored for his band) long before the popular rediscovery of Scott Joplin, and working with musicians from other areas of jazz (notably the Jamaican saxophonists Bertie King and Joe Harriott). Renewed interest in traditional jazz in the early 1960s brought wide success to Barber and his group, which included as its singer his wife, Ottilie Patterson. After rhythm-and-blues achieved general popularity in the early 1960s he re-formed his group as Chris Barber’s Jazz and Blues Band, and, while retaining his roots in New Orleans jazz, engaged rock and blues musicians guitarist John Slaughter and the drummer Pete York. During the 1970s the band toured frequently in Europe. In ...

Article

José Duarte

(b Lisbon, July 18, 1957). Portuguese double bass player and composer. He began his musical training at the age of eight on guitar and piano and later took up double bass. After graduating from the Conservatório Nacional in Lisbon in 1979 in double bass and music theory he continued his studies in Vienna (1980–82), during which time he played with Fritz Pauer. On his return to Lisbon he joined the Radiodifusão Portuguesa Symphony Orchestra and worked with a number of Portuguese jazz groups. In 1984 he moved to Paris, where he played at the city’s leading clubs, including New Morning, Magnetic Terrasse, Petit Journal Montparnasse, La Villa, Bilbouquet, and Dunois, with artists such as Steve Grossman, Steve Potts, Barry Altschul, Aldo Romano, Hal Singer, Alain Jean-Marie, Michel Graillier, and many others. He also appeared at numerous French festivals alongside such notable musicians such as Horace Parlan, Tony Scott, Lee Konitz, Glen Ferris, and Siegfried Kessler. In ...

Article

Lesley A. Wright

[Adrien ]

( b Bayonne, France, June 7, 1828; d Asnières-sur-Seine, France, Aug 13, 1898). French composer, pianist, and teacher . After studying with Leborne, he won the Prix de Rome in 1854. The music section of the Académie praised his envoi, the French opera Don Carlos (1857), for its craftsmanship, fine orchestration, and strong sense of the stage, and in 1858 they awarded him the Prix Édouard Rodrigues for his oratorio Judith, over the only other competitor, Bizet. That year Barthe married mezzo-soprano Anna Banderali.

The Théâtre-Lyrique opened a competition in 1864 on Jules Adenis’s libretto La fiancée d’Abydos, for Prix de Rome winners whose work had not yet reached the stage. Barthe was the unanimous choice of the jury, above Émile Paladilhe and three others. Extensive changes were made during rehearsal and the première took place on 30 December 1865. Critics were largely positive, though they noted resemblances to Meyerbeer, Félicien David, Gounod, and others, and found the libretto somewhat tedious. After a respectable 21 performances (in Paris and Bayonne) the work disappeared from the repertory....

Article

Jacques Aboucaya

(b St. Denis, France, Aug 22, 1956). French guitarist and composer. He took up guitar at the age of 14 and began playing contemporary music. After meeting Michel Portal in 1978 he joined several versions of Portal’s group Unit. The following year he played with Portal and Jean-François Jenny-Clark on Aldo Romano’s album Il piacere and made his first recordings as a leader. He played in a trio with Gérard Marais and Stu Martin (1979), was a member of Marais’ Big Band de Guitares (from 1982), formed a trio with the double bass player Jean-Luc Ponthieux and the drummer and singer Jacques Mahieux, and became the bass player and arranger in Jean-Marc Padovani’s quartet (1982) and the guitarist and bass player in the Nouvel Orchestra Philharmonique. In 1986 he created a work for brass quintet, musical sculptures, and jazz quartet, and in 1987...

Article

Adriano Mazzoletti

(b Genoa, Italy, May 15, 1902). Italian violinist, pianist, bandleader, arranger, and composer. In Genoa he studied violin and composition and played banjo for a brief period in an orchestra. He was the leader and an arranger for the group Blue Star (to 1931), of which Sid Phillips was a member, and the orchestra Cetra (from ...

Article

André Clergeat

(b Algiers, Feb 14, 1941). French pianist, arranger, leader, and musicologist. He discovered jazz following a period of classical piano studies. In 1962 he moved to Paris and performed in amateur bands, and in 1966 he became a professional musician. As house pianist at the Jazz O’Maniac he accompanied Albert Nicholas, Bill Coleman (1971–2), and Benny Waters (1971–3), as well as Benny Carter, Jo Jones, Illinois Jacquet, Buddy Tate, Slam Stewart, Stephane Grappelli, Vic Dickenson, Cat Anderson, and others. From 1976 to 1979 he was co-director, with Marc Richard, of the Anachronic Jazz Band, which aimed to present modern jazz themes with a traditional New Orleans jazz orchestration, as may be heard on Anachronic Jazz Band, i–ii (1976, 1978, Open 02, 09). From 1979 to 1983 he led the Happy Feet Quintet, with which he recorded the album Happy Feet and Friends (...

Article

Barry Kernfeld and Gary W. Kennedy

(b Trier, Germany, May 5, 1953). German pianist and composer. He studied music and various other subjects in Regensburg and then worked with a number of musicians, notably Aladár Pege, Albert Mangelsdorff, Michel Pilz, and Manfred Bründl. While serving as the director of music at the Städtischen Bühnen in Nuremberg (1979–85) he recorded in a duo with the trombonist Michel Trieirweiler and formed a trio, Overtone, which recorded an album of jazz standards in 1984 and made another recording in 1985. Overtone also worked as a big band, and in 1985 it performed a suite which Beier wrote as a tribute to John Coltrane. From 1984 Beier worked with Leszek Zadlo, and the two men played in each other’s groups and recorded in 1989 and 1994. Beier has been active as a composer for theater, radio, and television, and various genres other than jazz, and has taught at the conservatory in Würzburg (...

Article

Michel Laplace

(b Paris, April 8, 1922). French trumpeter and arranger. He began on cornet in an amateur band. He made his professional début at the Moulin Rouge in Paris (1939) and played with Maceo Jefferson (1939–41). After taking informal lessons from Aimé Barelli he played with Alix Combelle’s group the Jazz de Paris (1940–41), Fred Adison’s band, the pianist Raymond Wraskoff (1940–41), the drummer Jerry Mengo (1941–2), the violinist Claude Laurence (1942), and Combelle again (1943). In 1945 he led a big band that made several recordings (including Rockin’ the Blues/Two o’Clock Jump, BStar 9). He also worked with the bandleader and saxophonist Raymond Legrand (1953), the pianist Christian Chevallier (1955, 1957), Lucky Thompson (1956), and Jacques Hélian’s band (1956). He collaborated frequently with André Hodeir in the 1960s and continued to appear with him in the 1970s; also during the 1970s he played with the trumpeter Sonny Grey (...

Article

André Clergeat

(b Hyères, France, Aug 19, 1963). French saxophonist, clarinetist, composer, and leader, brother of Stéphane Belmondo. His father, a multi-instrumentalist and director of a music school in his home village, gave him his first lessons on piano and then on saxophone. With his brother Stéphane and their friend Thomas Bramerie he appeared in various groups in clubs on the Côte d’Azur before forming the Da Capo Jazztet (c1984). At the end of the 1980s Belmondo went to Paris, where he appeared in various clubs (notably the Bilboquet) and, with his brother, formed the Belmondo Quintet, playing in a hard-bop style. He also established, with François Théberge, the Big Band Belmondo, and in 1995, the group Sax Generation; in 1997 he recorded as a member of Théberge’s Composers Workshop.

Article

André Clergeat

(b Algiers, July 29, 1954). French double bass player and composer. He began guitar studies in Nice at the age of 12. Having taken up double bass, he began his professional career with, most notably, Bill Coleman and Guy Lafitte. In 1981 he moved to Paris, where he played with Aldo Romano, Martial Solal, Lee Konitz, Archie Shepp, Horace Parlan, Joshua Redman, Tom Harrell, Roy Haynes, and many other leading musicians in Europe. In 1986 he was a founding member of the Orchestre National de Jazz and formed a trio with Marc Ducret and Aaron Scott, and in 1988 he joined Urs Leimgruber’s group Réflexion, which toured Europe and Canada and appeared at Sweet Basil in New York. Benita toured India and Japan with Ducret in 1989, worked in Sweden, Paris, and Italy with the quartet Préférence, and performed with Romano, Paolo Fresu, Glenn Ferris, Ducret, Michel Portal, and Peter Erskine. In ...

Article

Frank Büchmann-Møller

(b Copenhagen, Feb 21, 1964). Danish pianist, composer, arranger, and keyboard player. The son of the classical composer and pianist Niels Viggo Bentzon, he received classical training at an early age from his father, who also introduced him to jazz. He studied at the Berklee College of Music (1983–6), then returned to Denmark, where he formed a trio with Thomas Ovesen and Jonas Johansen; the trio was so successful that in 1990 it became the rhythm section for the Radioens Big Band. Other groups formed by Bentzon include a funk-jazz ensemble, Nikolaj Bentzon Brotherhood, and a hard-bop septet, Nikolaj Bentzon and the Scandinavian Connection, the latter featuring, among others, Anders Bergcrantz on trumpet and Tomas Franck on tenor saxophone. Bentzon has also worked with Clark Terry, Red Rodney, Mike Gibbs, John Scofield, Bob Brookmeyer, Toots Thielemans, Herb Pomeroy, Tom Harrell, Joe Lovano, Steve Swallow, Carla Bley, Joe Henderson, and Maria Schneider, and recorded with the baritone saxophonist Per Goldschmidt (...