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Article

Brooks, Roy  

J. Kent Williams

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[Mjumbe ]

(b Detroit, Sept 3, 1938; d Detroit, Nov 15, 2005). American drummer, percussionist, and jazz educator. His mother sang in church. Brooks cites Elvin Jones as his first important influence. He first worked with Yusef Lateef, then joined Horace Silver’s quintet, of which he was a member from 1959 to 1964; during the same period he recorded with his fellow sidemen Junior Cook (1960) and Blue Mitchell (1961, 1963), as well as with Sonny Red (1960), Buddy Tate and Stanley Turrentine (both 1961), and Shirley Scott (1961–3). Later he performed with Wes Montgomery, Lateef (1967–70), Pharoah Sanders, James Moody (1970–72), Sonny Stitt (recording in 1972–3), Jackie McLean, Dexter Gordon, Randy Weston, Milt Jackson, Charles Mingus (mid-1972–1973, beginning with a tour of Europe), and Abdullah Ibrahim (including recordings, 1973, 1976, 1977), and recorded with Chet Baker (...

Article

Carr, Ian  

Stan Britt

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(b Dumfries, Scotland, April 21, 1933; d London, Feb 25, 2009). English trumpeter, flugelhorn player, bandleader, composer, writer, and teacher, brother of Mike Carr. His mother played ukulele and banjo. Carr grew up in northeast England, where he took piano lessons from the age of 12 and taught himself trumpet from 1950. After studying at King’s College, Newcastle upon Tyne (1952–60, degree, English literature, diploma, education) he served in the army (1956–8), then played with his brother in a band, the Emcee Five (1960 – August 1962). He briefly joined Don Rendell in November 1962 and, after recovering from illness, formed a long-lived quintet with Rendell from 1963 to July 1969; during this period he also worked with Joe Harriott (recording in 1969), Don Byas, and John McLaughlin. In September 1969 he formed his own band, Nucleus, which rapidly became recognized internationally for its experiments with jazz-rock. As a result of its performance at the Montreux International Jazz Festival in ...

Article

Coker, Jerry  

Dave Gelly

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(b South Bend, IN, Nov 28, 1932). American tenor saxophonist, composer, and teacher. On his birth certificate, Jerry Coker is his full given name. He joined Woody Herman’s orchestra in late 1953, interrupting his music studies at Indiana University, and toured with the group until summer 1954; his solo on I Love Paris (1953, Mars 1002) attracted considerable critical acclaim. He recorded in Paris for the Vogue label (1954) and in San Francisco as a leader and with Mel Lewis (both 1956), then worked as a freelance on the West Coast, playing for a brief period with Stan Kenton. His work with college bands led to his becoming a prominent teacher of jazz, and in 1960 he was appointed to the first of several university posts. Coker has written a number of books about jazz and is one of the most highly regarded writers within the field of jazz education; he has also composed for student bands. In the mid-1980s he recorded two new albums as a leader, ...

Article

Dapogny, James  

Daniel Zager

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(Elliot)[Jim]

(b Berwyn, IL, Sept 3, 1940; d Ann Arbor, MI, March 6, 2019). American editor, writer, teacher, leader, and pianist. He studied composition at the University of Illinois (BMus 1962, MMus 1963, DMA 1971) and from 1966 taught at the University of Michigan. In his work as an editor and writer he devoted particular attention to the music of Jelly Roll Morton; his book Ferdinand “Jelly Roll” Morton: the Collected Piano Music (1982) offers a comprehensive edition of transcriptions of a jazz musician’s work and includes biographical material and analysis. He also wrote entries on major jazz musicians for The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians (London, 1980). As a pianist Dapogny performed widely in concert and on radio and television, and he recorded as the leader of the Chicago Jazz Band, in a duo with Butch Thompson, and with the State Street Aces, the Mysterious Babies, and Sippie Wallace. His Chicago Jazz Band, founded in ...

Article

Garrick, Michael  

Mark Gilbert

revised by Simon Adams

(b Enfield, England, May 30, 1933; d Harefield, England, Nov 11, 2011). English pianist, organist, composer, and educator. He studied literature at London University and in the late 1950s led a trio and a quartet; from 1962 he combined these interests and took part in more than 250 events entitled Poetry and Jazz in Concert, in which leading poets read their works accompanied by jazz musicians, among them Joe Harriott and Shake Keane. Such combinations of jazz and literature became a recurrent preoccupation throughout his career. In 1965 he formed a sextet with Tony Coe, Harriott, Ian Carr, Coleridge Goode, and John Marshall; he also played with and composed works for the Don Rendell–Ian Carr Quintet (1965–9) and Neil Ardley’s New Jazz Orchestra (1965–7); Jazz at the Maltings: the Don Rendell/Ian Carr Quintet (1969) captures a television broadcast from 1968. During the 1960s and early 1970s Garrick made a series of popular recordings with his own groups, in configurations which ranged from trio to septet; the latter consisted of Norma Winstone, the flutist and tenor saxophonist Jimmy Philip, Art Themen, Henry Lowther, Trevor Tomkins, Dave Green, and the drummer Colin Barnes. He experimented with the use of harpsichord and celeste in jazz on ...

Article

Harris, Barry  

Andrew Scott

(Doyle)

(b Detroit, MI, Dec 15, 1929; d North Bergen, NJ, Dec 8, 2021). American jazz pianist, composer, and pedagogue. He first encountered music through the church where his mother worked as a pianist and he first performed. After starting piano lessons at the age of four, he taught himself the boogie-woogie style of Albert Ammons before hearing bebop at a performance by Charlie Parker at Club El Sino in 1947. Having played some of his first professional engagements with Frank Rosolino, Harris became the house pianist at the Blue Bird Inn in Detroit, where he accompanied Lester Young, Sonny Stitt, Miles Davis, and Parker, among others. After travelling to New York in 1956 to record with Thad Jones and Hank Mobley, Harris remained in Detroit until 1960, when he moved to New York to join Cannonball Adderley’s group. Harris made his first recording as a leader in 1958...

Article

Joseph, Julian  

Mark Gilbert

revised by Simon Adams

(Raphael Nathaniel)

(b London, May 11, 1966). English pianist, composer, educator, and broadcaster. Classically trained as a child, he took up jazz after seeing Oscar Peterson on television and hearing Herbie Hancock, his chief inspiration. He attended the Weekend Arts College directed by Ian Carr in north London, then spent the years 1985–9 on a scholarship at the Berklee College of Music in Boston. While in America he played with Branford Marsalis (1986–7), with whom he appeared in a performance of Royal Garden Blues on the video Jacksonville Jazz Festival VII (1987); he made frequent trips home to Britain, where he played with Courtney Pine, Steve Williamson, and others. He settled in London again in 1990 and recorded as a leader. In the early 1990s he played in New York, Australia, Jamaica, and St. Lucia, and in Europe with Chico Freeman, recording in 1993. In 1994...

Article

Katz, Fred(erick)  

Barry Kernfeld

(b New York, Feb 25, 1919; d Santa Monica, CA, Sept 7, 2013). American cellist and educator. A Strings magazine obituary gives his birth name as Fedya, but the New York Birth Index gives Frederick. After studying with Pablo Casals he became a professional musician and composer; he was music director for the 7th Army in Europe after World War II and in the early 1950s worked as a piano accompanist to the popular singers Lena Horne and Tony Bennett, among others. His jazz activities took place chiefly in the later 1950s, when he was a member of Chico Hamilton’s quintet (from 1955), made recordings with the group (until 1959, including The Chico Hamilton Quintet with Buddy Collette, 1955, PJ 1209), and appeared with it in the short film Cool and Groovy (1956) and the film documentary Jazz on a Summer’s Day (1960). He also recorded as an unaccompanied soloist (...

Article

LaBarbera family  

Steven Strunk and Barry Kernfeld

Family of musicians. Their surname appears as both LaBarbera and La Barbera in the literature (and sometimes in the brothers’ own hands), but their birth certificates give LaBarbera.

LaBarbera, Pat [Pascel Emmanuel] (b Warsaw, NY, April 7, 1944)

LaBarbera, John (Phillip) (b Warsaw, NY, Nov 10, 1945...

Article

LaBarbera, Pat  

Steven Strunk and Barry Kernfeld

[Pascel Emmanuel]

Member of LaBarbera family

(b Warsaw, NY, April 7, 1944). American tenor saxophonist and educator. His home town, Mt. Morris, had no hospital, hence he was actually born in the nearby town of Warsaw. He was first taught by his father, the clarinetist Joseph LaBarbera, then attended Potsdam (New York) State Teachers College and the Berklee School of Music (1964–7). While playing with Buddy Rich’s band (1967–74) he gained a reputation as a fine soloist; his style is derived principally from that of John Coltrane (as exemplified by the latter’s recording of Giant Steps), to which he adds his own rhythmic looseness and lyricism. In 1974 he settled in Toronto, where he undertook various engagements and worked for television; the following year he joined Elvin Jones, with whom he performed and recorded extensively until 1985 and again from 1990, after Jones returned from Japan; he appears with the group in the film documentary ...

Article

LaPorta, John  

Brian Priestley

(Daniel)

(b Philadelphia, April 13, 1920; d Sarasota, FL, May 12, 2004). American saxophonist, clarinetist, and teacher. He was a sideman in the big bands of Bob Chester (1942–4) and Woody Herman (1944–6; while with Herman he appeared in the film Earl Carroll Vanities (1945). He then studied with Lennie Tristano and other teachers, and he recorded with Tristano in 1947. With Teo Macero, Charles Mingus, and others, he was a founding member in 1953 of the Jazz Composers’ Workshop; this established an experimental movement in New York which rivaled that in Los Angeles. LaPorta studied at the Manhattan School of Music (BS clarinet 1956, MME 1957), after which he began teaching there. From 1959 to 1985 he served on the faculty at the Berklee School of Music (from 1973 the Berklee College of Music), where he performed in a faculty saxophone quartet. He also played in Herb Pomeroy’s big band from ...

Article

Longnon, Guy  

Howard Rye

(b Paris, July 16, 1924; d Marseille, France, Feb 4, 2014). American trumpeter and educator, uncle of Jean-Loup Longnon. In June 1947 he was a member of Boris Vian’s band at the Tabou in Paris, but by October 1950 he had joined Claude Luter’s band at the Vieux Colombier, initially playing valve trombone. He recorded on trumpet with Don Byas in the Saratoga Jazz Hounds early in 1951. Longnon remained with Luter until summer 1953, working much of the time with Sidney Bechet (including tours of France, Switzerland, Belgium, and Algeria) but also on occasion also with Mezz Mezzrow. In summer 1953 he was a member with Big Chief Russell Moore of a band led by the drummer Moustache Galipedes which performed at the Palm Beach in Cannes and recorded. He was with Michel Attenoux’s band accompanying Bechet on a tour of France and Belgium from January to ...

Article

Luigi  

Claude Conyers

[Eugene Louis Facciuto]

(b Steubenville, OH, March 20, 1925; d New York, April 7, 2015). American jazz dance innovator and teacher. Coached by his brother, he developed an act with singing, dancing, and acrobatic tricks that made him a frequent winner of talent shows and that led to his first jobs as vaudeville emcee and band singer. After military service in World War II, he went to Hollywood seeking a career in movie musicals, but his plans were disrupted when a car accident left him partially paralyzed. He developed a series of exercises that enabled him to recover from his injuries and to begin studying ballet and tap dance. Despite initial limitations, he had an eight-year career in which he appeared in more than forty musical films, working with many leading choreographers and dancers of the late 1940s and early 1950s. His importance lies not in his performing career, however, but in the exercise routine he created for his rehabilitation, which became the first complete technique for learning jazz dance. In ...

Article

McGhee, Andy  

Barry Kernfeld

[Andrew]

(b Wilmington, NC, Nov 3, 1927; d Marietta, GA, Oct 12, 2017). American tenor saxophonist. He moved to Boston in 1945 to enroll in the diploma program at the New England Conservatory. After graduating in 1949 he worked briefly with Roy Eldridge. Drafted in 1950, he served as an instructor in an army band in New Jersey and then, in his second year, as a soldier in the Korean War. Following his discharge in 1952 he took Sam Rivers’s place with the rhythm-and-blues saxophonist Paul “Fat Man” Robinson, whose band was based at the Knickerbocker Cafe in Boston and toured extensively; he remained with Robinson for five years. Between 1957 and 1963 he played for Lionel Hampton, with whom he toured the USA, Europe, and the Far East; among the recordings he made with Hampton is The Many Sides of Lionel Hampton (c1960, Glad Hamp 1001...

Article

Mitchell, Dwike  

Philip Greene

[Ivory, Jr.]

(b Dunedin, FL, Feb 14, 1930; d Jacksonville, FL, April 7, 2013). American pianist. From the age of five he took piano lessons and played for church services. He served in the army (1946–9), and performed in bands at the Lockbourne (Ohio) Air Force Base. After studying at the Philadelphia Musical Academy, in 1954 he joined Lionel Hampton’s band. The following year he formed the Mitchell–Ruff Duo with Willie Ruff, whom he had first met at Lockbourne, and who also played for Hampton. They performed and lectured throughout the USA, and also in the USSR, Mexico, and China; the duo appeared at the Jazz Showcase in Chicago in August 1994 and lasted for 56 years, finally disbanding only in 2011. Mitchell’s playing was elegant and stylish, and he possessed a prodigious technique.

For recording-list, films, and bibliography see Ruff, Willie.

Obituary, New York Times (April 18, 2013)...

Article

Morgenstern, Dan  

Paula Morgan

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(Michael)

(b Munich, Oct 24, 1929). American writer. He grew up in Vienna, but left in 1938 and spent the next nine years as a refugee in Denmark and Sweden. After moving to the USA in 1947 he studied history at Brandeis University (1953–6). From 1958 to 1961 he was the New York correspondent for Jazz Journal. He then served as editor of Metronome (1961), Jazz (1962–3), and Down Beat (New York editor, 1964–6, editor 1966–73) magazines; during the 1960s he also produced jazz concerts in New York and for television. In the mid-1970s he held appointments as visiting lecturer in jazz at Brooklyn College and the Peabody Institute, and in 1976 he became director of the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers, in which capacity he worked as an editor of the Journal of Jazz Studies (from 1982 the Annual Review of Jazz Studies...

Article

Moseholm, Erik  

Erik Wiedemann

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(b Fredericia, Denmark, May 13, 1930; d Oct 12, 2012). Danish double bass player, educator, and music administrator. In the early 1950s he performed and recorded with the baritone saxophonist Max Brüel and the trumpeter Jørgen Ryg and was then a member of the Radiodanseorkesteret (1954–5), Ib Glindemann’s big band (1957), and Finn Savery’s trio (1957–8, 1960). From 1959 he worked in duos and led trios, one of which performed at the festivals in Antibes–Juan-les-Pins and Comblain-la-Tour in 1960; he also led the band Radiojazzgruppen from its inception in 1961 until 1966, when he began working in programming for Danmarks Radio (see Radiojazzgruppen). Moseholm was the leading double bass player in Denmark in the 1950s, and his playing may be heard to advantage on the album Trio Suite (Artist 505), recorded in 1970 with the drummer Jørn Elniff and the pianist Arne Forchhammer. From ...

Article

Panayi, Andy  

Gary W. Kennedy

revised by Simon Adams

(b London, Jan 18, 1964). English saxophonist, flutist, and educator. His father, a Greek Cypriot, was a professional musician. He learned to play flute and baritone and alto saxophones before settling on the tenor instrument, and studied at Trinity College of Music. Having toured with the National Youth Jazz Orchestra, he played in various jazz groups, in theater orchestras, and with the pop group the Blow Monkeys. In the 1990s he worked with Alec Dankworth’s quartet, the Dankworth Generation band, Tommy Smith, and Stan Tracey. In 1994 he formed a quartet which has remained active in the new century, with Mark Nightingale, the double bass player Simon Woolf, and various drummers; in this setting he has played baritone sax in a deliberate evocation of Gerry Mulligan’s renowned quartet. He has also led a nonet and has regularly played with, among others, Alan Barnes, the pianist Terry Seabrook, and the trumpeter Steve Waterman. A professor of jazz flute at the Royal College of Music (from ...

Article

Pickens, Willie (L.)  

Deborah Gillaspie

(b Milwaukee, April 18, 1931; d New York, Dec 12, 2017). American pianist, composer, and arranger. He began formal piano study at the age of 14 and attended the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music before entering the army in 1951. Later he studied music education at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (BS 1958). After moving to Chicago in 1958 he taught music in public schools (1966–90) and at the American Conservatory (1971–87); in 1997 he joined the faculty of Northern Illinois University. He is best known outside Chicago for his work with Eddie Harris (1961–6) and, later, Elvin Jones (1990–97), with whom he appears in the video Elvin Jones Jazz Machine (n.d. [filmed 1991]). A powerful and harmonically sophisticated pianist, he formed a short-lived trio with Muhal Richard Abrams and Amina Claudine Myers (December 1975) and appeared with many leading players, among them Roy Eldridge, Art Farmer, Dexter Gordon, Johnny Griffin, Roy Haynes, Milt Jackson, Roscoe Mitchell, Red Norvo, Max Roach, and Joe Williams; his trio consisting of Larry Gray on double bass and Robert Shy on drums was one of the finest modern-jazz rhythm sections in Chicago. Pickens appeared regularly at international jazz festivals and performed at Chicago Jazz Festival almost yearly from its inception. He was interviewed by Marian McPartland for her NPR radio show “Piano Jazz” in ...

Article

Pomeroy, (Irving) Herb(ert, III)  

Barry Kernfeld

(b Gloucester, MA, April 15, 1930; d Gloucester, Aug 11, 2007). Bandleader, trumpeter, and teacher. After studying at the Schillinger House of Music (1950–52) and playing in Boston with Charlie Parker (for one week in June 1953) and Charlie Mariano (later that same year) he toured as a trumpeter with Lionel Hampton (December 1953 – April 1954) and Stan Kenton (September 1954). He then returned to Boston and worked with Serge Chaloff (1954–5). In 1955 he began teaching at Schillinger, which the previous year had taken a new name, the Berklee School of Music. While establishing himself as the cornerstone of this school’s growing jazz program he led a 16-piece swing and bop ensemble that performed regularly at The Stables (1956–60); among its sidemen were Joe Gordon, Jaki Byard (who was then playing tenor saxophone), Boots Mussulli, and later, Mariano and Bill Berry. He was also the leader of another band (...