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date: 20 August 2019

Blewitt, Jonathanlocked

  • Edward F. Rimbault
  • , revised by Alfred Loewenberg

Extract

(b London, July 19, 1782; d London, Sept 4, 1853). English organist, conductor and composer, son of Jonas Blewitt. He studied with Battishill and with Haydn, and held various organ appointments in England, moving to Ireland in 1811 as private organist to Lord Cahir. He was organist of St Andrew’s, Dublin, and composer and director of the music to the Theatre Royal (Crow Street), succeeding Tom Cooke in the latter post in June 1813. In the same year the Duke of Leinster appointed him grand organist to the Masonic body of Ireland, and he became the conductor of the principal concerts in Dublin. He joined J.B. Logier in his system of music instruction in Ireland and soon became the foremost teacher in Dublin.

Before 1825 Blewitt was again in London and wrote the music for Drury Lane Theatre with great success. In 1828 and 1829 he was director of the music at Sadler’s Wells Theatre. In his latter years he was connected with the Tivoli Gardens at Margate. His ballads in the Irish style were particularly popular, and in ...

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Dictionary of National Biography (Oxford, 1885-1901, suppls., 1901-96)
A. Nicoll: The History of English Drama, 1660-1900 (Cambridge, 1952-9)