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date: 18 August 2019

Paterson & Sonslocked

  • Peter Ward Jones

Extract

Scottish music dealers, publishers and instrument makers . The firm was started in Edinburgh about 1819 by Robert Paterson (d 1859) and others as Robert Paterson, Mortimer & Co. In 1826 Peter Walker Roy (d Edinburgh, 7 Dec 1851) joined the firm, which became Paterson & Roy and later opened a London branch. After Roy's death the business traded as Paterson & Sons. Paterson was succeeded at his death by his son Robert Roy Paterson, under whose direction the firm expanded to become one of the most important of its kind in Scotland, with branches in Glasgow (1857, directed by Paterson's elder brother John Walker Paterson), Perth (1864), Ayr (1868), Dundee (1882), Dumfries (1886), Paisley (1887), Kilmarnock (1892), and later Aberdeen and Oban. Its 19th-century publications included Scottish music of all kinds, with many reprints of standard editions of Scottish songs. During the 20th century its publishing activities were gradually taken over by the London branch, which, as Paterson's Publications Ltd, concentrated largely on choral and piano music for school and amateur use. The Scottish branch of the business ceased in ...

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