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Article

Diane Pecknold

(b Nashville, TN, Aug 27, 1928; d Nashville, June 13, 2012). American music executive and philanthropist. Preston began her career as a messenger for the National Life and Accident Insurance Company. She soon became a receptionist at the company’s radio station, WSM, and was largely responsible for organizing the early WSM Disc Jockey Convention, an event that would become the most important annual gathering for country music professionals. In 1958 she was hired to open a Nashville office for Broadcast music, inc . Under her direction, BMI became the dominant performing rights organization in the region and, by offering advances to new publishers and songwriters, the central economic engine of the country music industry. By 1964 BMI Nashville had expanded from two people working in Preston’s garage to 400 employees, and she reportedly became the first female executive in Tennessee when she was promoted to vice president. In 1985...

Article

Clare Iannota Nielsen

(b Lona, c1510; d Venice, ?1576). Italian printer and bookseller. He was active in Venice and worked in the parish of S Giovanni Novo, with a shop on the calle delle Rasse. In 1572 he was elected Prior of the Guild of Booksellers and Printers, succeeding Girolamo Scotto. Working mainly on commission for others, Rampazetto produced at least 190 books in Italian, Latin, Greek or Spanish; literary works, notably reprints, figure prominently in his output.

From 1561 until 1568 he printed music – 31 sets of partbooks, one theory book and a book of laudi spirituali. The last, Serafino Razzi’s voluminous collection (RISM 15636), was sent to Rampazetto by the Florentine publisher Filippo Giunta because Florence had no musical press at the time. Among his other commissions were an anthology of motets (1563³) compiled and edited by the printer Antonio Barrè, and the second book of Vinci’s five-part madrigals (...

Article

Alex Harris Stein

(b Pittsburgh, PA, Jan 29, 1915; d Paterson, NJ, March 18, 1995). American writer on jazz, record producer, and folklorist. He coedited one of the first scholarly books on jazz with Charles Edward Smith, Jazzmen: the Story of Hot Jazz Told in the Lives of the Men who Created It (New York, 1939). Supported in part by Guggenheim Fellowships (1953, 1955), Ramsey conducted extensive fieldwork throughout the American South, photographing African American life and recording interviews and music. The results of his travels are detailed in his books Been Here and Gone (New Brunswick, NJ, 1960) and Where the Music Started (New Brunswick, NJ, 1970). Many of his field recordings were released by Folkways Records as Music of the South (1954). He produced a historical anthology of recordings for Folkways titled Jazz (1950–53). Later, grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities (...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(b London, c1728; d London, ?Jan 1776). English music seller and publisher, brother of John Randall. He was a son or more probably a grandson of Peter Randall, a London music publisher associated with John Walsh, and was presumably the Randall found among the Children of the Chapel Royal from 1736 to 1745. At the death of his cousin John Walsh in 1766, he and John Abell inherited the extensive Walsh business, where they had doubtless been employed. They published for the first time the complete full scores of a number of Handel oratorios, starting with Messiah (1767). After Abell's death on 29 July 1768, Randall remained in business alone. Besides reprinting Walsh publications, sometimes with the original imprint in addition to his own, he published many interesting works, including a reissue in 1771 of Morley's A Plaine and Easie Introduction to Practicall Musicke. Collections of country dances and pleasure-garden songs also came from his press. At his death, his widow Elizabeth carried on the business until ...

Article

Miles White

[Antonio ]

(b Cincinnati, OH, June 7, 1956). American songwriter, producer, and recording industry executive. One of the most influential African American music executives of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Reid shared songwriting or production credits on a string of major crossover albums in the 1980s and 1990s, among them Bobby Brown’s Don’t Be Cruel (1988), Paula Abdul’s Forever Your Girl (1988), Whitney Houston’s I’m Your Baby Tonight (1990), The Bodyguard soundtrack album (1992), and TLC’s CrazySexyCool (1994). His first professional success came as a drummer for the R&B group the Deele, which featured singer Babyface Edmonds. In 1989 Reid and Edmonds began producing hits together in Los Angeles before starting LaFace Records in Atlanta under a joint partnership with Arista Records. LaFace mentored a new generation of artists including Usher, Outkast, Toni Braxton, and TLC, making Atlanta an important hub in the popular music industry. Reid and Edmonds collaborated on writing or producing 33 number one singles during their partnership, and in ...

Article

David Sanjek

(b North Little Rock, AR, Aug 18, 1938). American country music songwriter and producer. One of the most prolific and successful country music songwriters and producers of the last few decades, Reynolds also has played a major role in the careers of a number of artists, most notably Garth Brooks. Reynolds began writing songs while studying for a degree in English at Rhodes College in Memphis, Tennessee. One of his classmates was singer-songwriter Dickey Lee, with whom Reynolds became a collaborator when the duo moved to Beaumont, Texas. They cowrote “I saw Linda yesterday,” which was a top-20 hit for Lee in 1963. Reynolds and Lee returned thereafter to Memphis and formed a publishing company, whose writing roster included Bob McDill and Paul Craft. In 1965 the firm achieved a top-five hit with the Vogues’ recording of Reynolds’s “Five O’Clock World.” Reynolds moved to Nashville in 1970 and established a reputation as a premiere producer and songwriter. He has coordinated projects for Kathy Mattea, Hal Ketchum, Don Williams, Crystal Gayle, Emmylou Harris, and the O’Kanes and written several hit songs, including Crystal Gayle’s “Wrong Road Again” and “Somebody loves you,” Waylon Jennings’s “Dreaming My Dreams with You,” and Don Williams’s “We should be together.” His most successful association has been with Garth Brooks, who remains the best-selling artist of the post-Sound Scan era (post-...

Article

Jonas Westover

(b Philadelphia, PA, March 11, 1952). American record executive. Rhone is the first African American woman to head a major record label. Growing up in a prominent family in Harlem, Rhone had contact with many well-known musicians, including Duke Ellington and Cab Calloway. She received a degree in economics and marketing from the University of Pennsylvania and went on to work briefly in management. She began to work at Buddah Records in 1974, advancing quickly from secretary to promotions manager. Two years later, Rhone moved to ABC Records, then to Ariola, and eventually to Elektra in 1980. After progressing through the ranks there, Rhone transferred to Atlantic in 1986, where she led the label’s black music division. This venture was so successful that Rhone was given the opportunity to start her own label, EastWest Records America, in 1990. Within only a few years popular groups such as En Vogue, Pantera, and AC/DC were signed. She was named the chairman and chief executive officer of Elektra/EastWest in ...

Article

Frank Kidson, William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones, and David Hunter

(fl 1737–c1782). English engraver, print-seller and publisher in London. From 1737 until about 1762 he kept a music and print shop in Holborn from which he issued several notable books of songs with pictorial embellishments heading each piece. The earliest, the two-volume Calliope, or English Harmony, was issued from 1737 by and for the engraver in periodical numbers of eight octavo pages each at sixpence per number. The first volume of 25 numbers was completed in 1739; the parts of the second volume began to appear in the same year, though it was probably not finished until about 1746. John Simpson brought out second issues of volume one in 1740 and of volume two in 1747. Late in 1741 Roberts and John Johnson (successor to the Wrights), were accused by Thomas Arne of violating his copyright by printing some of his songs in the second volume of ...

Article

Mike Alleyne

(b New York, NY, Sept 19, 1952). American producer, composer, and guitarist. At the helm of the band Chic , Rodgers and his bass-playing production partner Bernard Edwards (1952–96) epitomized the very best of the disco era while transcending the genre with one of popular music’s most dynamic and cohesive rhythm sections. Individually with highly distinctive guitar licks, Rodgers also successfully transitioned into the 1980s, producing platinum pop records for David Bowie, Madonna, Duran Duran, and many other major acts. This effectively made him one of that decade’s most highly regarded and commercially bankable industry figures.

Rodgers and Edwards met in 1970, becoming members of the Big Apple Band that backed R&B vocal group New York City in 1973, and eventually formed Chic in 1977, releasing an eponymous debut album that year on Atlantic Records that included the Top Ten hit and gold record “Dance, Dance, Dance (Yowsah, Yowsah).” The follow-up album ...

Article

Alec Hyatt King

revised by O.W. Neighbour

[Albrecht]

(b Munich, Oct 5, 1914; d Oxford, Aug 3, 2004). English antiquarian music dealer of German birth. He was educated at the Wilhelmsgymnasium in Munich and settled in England in September 1933. He continued his studies in London, with Robin Flower at the British Museum in palaeography, and then at the Warburg Institute, where he worked on palaeography, medieval book illustration and iconography as assistant to Wittkower and Saxl. He studied musicology privately with Wellesz. In 1955 Rosenthal and his wife Maud bought the London business of Otto Haas, which they continued under Haas’s name, extending its tradition of scholarly expertise. Rosenthal’s fine judgment, based on his specialized academic training, contributed to the firm’s leading position among antiquarian dealers. It has handled the sale of many famous collections, including those of Cortot, Scholes and Prunières, as well as many notable single items. He also became a trustee of the Beethoven-Haus, Bonn, and of the Paul Sacher Stiftung, Basle, for which he negotiated acquisitions of the Stravinsky, Webern, Maderna, Wolpe, Carter, Birtwistle, Kagel and other archives. He was awarded the Hon. MA (Oxon) in ...

Article

Jonas Westover

(Harry )

(b Upper Darby, PA, June 22, 1948). American singer-songwriter, composer, and producer. He began his career as a teenager singing with the bands Woody’s Truck Stop and the more successful rock quartet Nazz. As a member of the latter group, he wrote two of their hit songs, “Hello, it’s me” and “Open your Eyes” (both 1968). After releasing three albums with Nazz, Rundgren left the group and worked as a solo artist, recording most of the vocal and instrumental parts himself. He cited the songwriter Laura Nyro as a significant influence. During the early 1970s Rundgren worked with a trio, Runt, recording two albums, the second entitled Runt: the Ballad of Todd Rundgren (1971), and his own two-record set, Something/Anything? (1972). The latter album brought him unprecedented fame through the singles “I Saw the Light” and a new version of “Hello, it’s me.” The recordings ...

Article

Jonas Westover

[Bridges, Claude Russell]

(b Lawton, OK, April 2, 1942; d Nashville, Nov 10, 2016). American singer, songwriter, keyboard player, and producer. He is well respected for his solo work—a mix of rock, folk, and country music—but his work as a session musician also brought significant recognition. He began playing piano at the age of four and was playing in clubs in Tulsa as a high school student. His band, the Starlighters, managed to score a spot as the opening act for Jerry Lee Lewis in 1959. Russell moved to Los Angeles the same year and quickly established himself as a session musician, notably with the Wrecking Crew the group of musicians Phil Spector used to accompany his artists. With the Wrecking Crew, the accompanied artists such as the Byrds, Herb Alpert, and Gary Lewis and the Playboys. The keyboard player on hundreds of recordings, he opened his own recording studio in ...

Article

Stefano Ajani

revised by Bianca Maria Antolini

(b c1643; d Feb 1, 1727). Italian publisher, printer and bookseller. From 1676 he was a member of the Venetian Printers' Guild, and in the same year he began printing thanks to the financial support of the composer Natale Monferrato, maestro di cappella of S Marco, publishing his Salmi concertati a 2 voci con violini e senza (op.11). He conducted his business, under the sign of King David playing the harp, at S Giovanni Grisostomo in the house of Monferrato. On the composer's death in 1685, Sala became the sole proprietor of the firm. In 1682 he published, anonymously, L’armonia sonora delle sonate, an anthology, edited by himself, of 12 sonatas for two violins and basso continuo by various composers.

An Indice dell’opere di musica sin hora stampate da Giuseppe Sala in Venezia (?1714) enumerates his output of psalms, motets, cantatas and sonatas, in particular those of Bassani, Monferrato, Giulio Taglietti and Corelli; he published at least 14 editions of Corelli’s first five opus numbers. The index also shows that he published psalms by Sartorio, D.F. Rossi, Cazzati and F.M. Benedetti, motets by Legrenzi, G.B. Allegri, Bonporti, G.M. Bononcini and Gasparini, cantatas by Caldara, G.L. Gregori and Albinoni and sonatas by G.B. Vitali, Legrenzi, de Castro, Corelli, Torelli, Ercole Bernabei and Benedetto Marcello. Altogether Sala printed 151 publications between ...

Article

Lorena Guillén

(b El Palomar, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Aug 19, 1951). Argentine musician, recording producer, and film music composer. With his bands Arco Iris and Soluna, Santaolalla was one of the pioneers of Argentine “rock nacional” in the 1960s. In 1978 he moved to Los Angeles, California, where he formed the punk-influenced band Wet Picnic. In the early 1980s his interest in folk-rock fusion helped develop a unique Latin American rock and pop sound. He has produced albums for Argentine, Mexican, Colombian, and Chilean artists such as León Gieco, Divididos, Bersuit Vergarabat, Café Tacuba, Maldita Vecindad, Molotov, Julieta Venegas, Caifanes, Juanes, and Los Prisioneros. In the last decade Santaolalla has also produced classical-crossover recordings such as Kronos Quartet’s Nuevo and participated as a composer and performer for some tracks of Osvaldo Golijov’s Ayre. Santaolalla has also recorded his own solo albums: Santaolalla (1981), Gas (1995), and ...

Article

Thomas Lewis

(b Uzlian, province of Minsk, Russia, Feb 27, 1891; d New York, NY, Dec 12, 1971). Broadcasting executive of Russian birth. The son of a housepainter and a seamstress, Sarnoff immigrated to the United States with his mother and brothers in 1900. The family joined their father in a tenement on New York City’s Lower East Side. Within days of his arrival Sarnoff worked in communications, selling newspapers, delivering telegraph cables, and then serving as an office boy, telegraph operator, and chief inspector for the American Marconi Wireless Telegraph Company. After World War I, the Marconi Company pooled its radio patents with those from ATT, Westinghouse, General Electric, and others to form the Radio Corporation of America. Sarnoff became commercial manager and eventually president, CEO, and chairman of the board. At RCA Sarnoff made four significant contributions to music production and consumption in the 20th century: a proposal for a “radio music box”; the creation of the National Broadcasting Company; the acquisition of the Victor Talking Machine Company; and the creation of the NBC Symphony Orchestra....

Article

Charles K. Wolfe

revised by Patrick Huber

(b Bristol, England, Oct 19, 1889; d Fountain Valley, CA, Feb 10, 1986). record producer and executive of British birth. He immigrated to the United States in 1913 and worked in a variety of positions for the Wisconsin Chair Company of Port Washington, Wisconsin, including at the firm’s subsidiary plant in New London, Wisconsin, which manufactured cabinets for Edison phonographs. Around 1915, after Edison purchased the plant, Satherley worked briefly as an assistant secretary to Thomas A. Edison himself. Two years later Satherley assisted in setting up the Wisconsin Chair Company’s phonograph record manufacturing division, the New York Recording Laboratories. He spent the next decade or so working for the firm’s Paramount label, first as the manager of the pressing plant in Grafton, Wisconsin, developing the formula for shellac discs, and then as sales manager for Paramount’s East Coast operation, promoting its line of Race record s. In ...

Article

Nigel Simeone

(b Eichstätt, Feb 23, 1921). German antiquarian dealer, publisher and bibliographer. He founded his antiquarian business at Tutzing near Munich in 1949, issuing a number of catalogues each year. Several of these have become useful works of reference on individual composers, including Brahms, Mozart, Paganini and Schumann, while an innovative series devoted to individual publishers, including Schott, André and Universal Edition, has also been produced. By 1998 the firm had issued over 350 antiquarian catalogues, usually devoted to one of three specialist areas: important manuscripts and letters, first and early editions, and music literature. Through its prolific but scrupulously detailed catalogues, the firm established itself as one of the most important in postwar Europe.

In 1958 Schneider founded a publishing house which has produced some fine facsimiles such as Beethoven's Missa solemnis (Kyrie only) and Brahms's Clarinet Trio. A significant aspect of the firm's activity has been the publication of scholarly series such as the pioneering Musikbibliographische Arbeiten guides to the first editions of composers from Mozart to Messiaen. Other series include Orff-Dokumentation (8 vols.), a catalogue of music in the Hoboken Collection (...

Article

J. Bradford Young

American firm of music publishers . Edward Schuberth began his association with the New York branch of the Leipzig publisher Julius Schuberth in 1858. When the branch closed in 1872, he established his own publishing business in Union Square. His earliest publications were by German and German-trained musicians, and included songs with English and German words, German-American pieces such as Fritz Neumüller’s Campaign March for Grover Cleveland (1884) and a series of European piano pieces edited by William Mason. Schuberth was the first American publisher of Victor Herbert’s music, issuing his first five operettas, the Second Cello Concerto and some orchestral music. In the 1890s the firm published English translations of European operettas by Ludwig Engländer and Ede Poldini, which were popular in New York, as well as those by the American composer De Koven. Schuberth became recognised as one of the major American publishers of serious music.

In ...

Article

Craig Jennex

(b Thunder Bay, ON, Nov 28, 1949). Canadian pianist, composer, musical director, actor, producer, and bandleader. He has been musical director for David Letterman’s late-night shows since 1982. Prior to working with Letterman, Shaffer was a featured performer on “Saturday Night Live.” He has served as musical director and producer for the Blues Brothers and cowrote the 1980s dance hit “It’s raining men.” He has served as musical director for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony since its inception in ...

Article

Jonas Westover

[Westover, Charles Weedon ]

(b Grand Rapids, MI, Dec 30, 1934; d Santa Clarita, CA, Feb 8, 1990). American singer, songwriter, and producer. Growing up, he learned to play ukulele and guitar while immersing himself in country-and-western music. Throughout the second half of the 1950s, he played in a variety of bands while in the military and also in Michigan. He used several different names during his time as a performer, but finally settled on “Del Shannon” in 1960. In the same year Shannon and his fellow musician, Max Crook, were signed to Bigtop Records in New York. The two wrote and recorded the rock and roll hit “Runaway” in 1961, with the single reaching number one on the Billboard chart. In the following two years Shannon wrote and performed several other successful singles, including “So long, baby,” “Hats off to Larry,” and “Little Town Flirt.” His 1963 cover of “From Me to You” was one of the first American covers of a Beatles song. After moving to Amy Records in ...