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Aja Burrell Wood

National nonprofit organization founded in 1996 by University of Michigan graduates Aaron P(aul) Dworkin and Carrie Chester. Dworkin and Chester sought to increase cultural diversity in the field of classical music and simultaneously overcome cultural stereotypes. The mission of the organization is, first, to increase the participation of blacks and Latinos as students in music schools, as professional musicians, and as classical music audiences; and second, to administer youth development initiatives in underserved communities through music education and by providing high-quality musical instruments.

The Sphinx Competition, a cornerstone program, began in 1998 as an annual string competition for black and Latino classical string players, from junior high through college, who compete for prizes and scholarships. The organization has since expanded to include an additional 13 professional, educational, community outreach, and performance initiatives under their Artist Development, Sphinx Prep, Sphinx Performance Academy, Sphinx Legacy Project, and Sphinx Presents programs. Sphinx also currently maintains three ensembles comprised of critically acclaimed professionals: The Sphinx Symphony, Sphinx Virtuosi, and Catalyst Quartet. The organization also regularly commissions, programs, and archives works by black and Latino composers....

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German musical institute . Established in Bückeburg under court patronage in 1917, the Fürstliches Institut für Musikwissenschaftliche Forschung (C.A. Rau, director) consisted of a library, a special collection of 16th-century music, a department to serve local musical activities and an archive of reproductions of German musical manuscripts and rare printed editions. Its journal, Archiv für Musikwissenschaft (AMw), first appeared in 1918, followed by the publication of monographs, facsimiles and editions of early music pertinent to the history of Bückeburg. Crippled by the economic crisis, the institute discontinued Archiv für Musikwissenschaft in 1926 and ceased most of its other functions during the Depression.

In 1933 officials in the Nazi Education Ministry worked together with Max Seiffert (interim director since Rau’s death in 1921) to resurrect the institute, move it to Berlin and expand its functions. In 1935 the new Staatliches Institut für Deutsche Musikforschung was established in Berlin, annexed two other Berlin collections (the Archiv Deutscher Volkslieder and the music instrument collection of the Hochschule für Musik) and assumed co-editorship of ...

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Roger L. Hall

The oldest continuing choral society in the United States, organized in Stoughton, Massachusetts on 7 November 1786. Its Constitution, the first of its kind for a musical society, was completed on 8 October 1787, just a few weeks after the US Constitution was written.

R.L. Hall: Music in Stoughton: A Brief Survey...

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[Swedish Society for Musicology]

A society founded in 1919 by members of the Swedish section of the Internationale Musikgesellschaft, to promote musicology, especially research into Swedish music. At the time of its foundation musicology was not an established discipline in Sweden so that from its first volume the Svensk tidskrift för musikforskning was of seminal importance. The society has published early Swedish music, in the series Äldre Svensk Musik (1930s), and on a more ambitious scale in the Monumenta Musicae Svecicae (1958–), and the complete works of Berwald. Studies, bibliographies and documents are published in the series Musik i Sverige (1969–). Outstanding presidents of the society have been Tobias Norlind (1919–26 and 1943–4), Einar Sundström (1939–42), C.-A. Moberg (1945–61), Ingmar Bengtsson (1961–86), Anna Johnson (1986–90) and Greger Andersson (from 1990). In 1995 it had about 350 members.

I. Bengtsson...

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Milena Bozhikova

Bulgarian composers’ union. The first association of Bulgarian musicians was known as Săvremenna muzika—druzhestvo na bălgarskite komponisti (‘Contemporary Music—Bulgarian Society of Composers’), and was founded on 24 January 1933 by Pancho Vladigerov, Dimităr Nenov, Assen Dimitrov, Lyubomir Pipkov, Petko Staynov, Andrey Stoyanov, Veselin Stoyanov, and Tsanko Tsankov. Chaired by A. Stoyanov they adopted the following roles: president Staynov, vice-president Vladigerov, secretary-treasurer Nenov, and control board (Dimitrov, Pipkov, and V. Stoyanov). The founders pursued the following objectives: to create interest in Bulgarian music; to encourage composers to use folklore; to create better working conditions for composers; to assist poor and needy composers; and to maintain the status and reputation of established Bulgarian composers.

Performances of Bulgarian music were considered the chief priority. This society existed until 1944. On 12 February 1947, 17 people established a new Asotsiatsiya na bălgarskite kompozitori i muzikolozi (‘Association of Bulgarian Composers and Musicologists’) as a successor to Săvremenna muzika (‘Contemporary Music’), in order to unite musicians and disseminate Bulgarian music. The president was L. Pipkov, vice-president Ivan Kambourov, secretary V. Krăstev, and treasurer B. Ikonomov. After a month, on 17 March, performing artists joined the Association, though they left again on ...

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[Society of Romanian Composers, Union of Composers, Uniunea Compozitorilor și Muzicologilor din România]

Professional association of Romanian composers and musicologists. It was founded in 1920 as the Society of Romanian Composers (SRC) and its main purpose was to support Romanian music. The objectives that it has pursued ever since have been to encourage native composition, to promote it through concerts and the publishing of scores, and to defend the interests of Romanian musicians both at home and abroad. Among the musicians who established the SRC were Ion Nonna Otescu, Alfred Alessandrescu, Constantin Brăiloiu, Tiberiu Brediceanu, George Dima, Dumitru Kiriac, Mihail Jora, Filip Lazăr, Dimitrie Cuclin, Constantin Nottara, Mihail Andricu, Theodor Rogalski, and Ion Vidu. Its first elected president, George Enescu, served this role for 28 years. In more than nine decades of existence, the institution has known highs and lows, always in close connection to the social and political events that have shaped Romania. In its first phase (1920–44), the SRC honourably fulfilled its mission, including for the duration of World War II, largely due to the efforts of Brăiloiu, Alessandrescu, Jora, and Enescu. It entered into decline after the war, as Romania became part of the Soviet sphere of influence. The forced politicisation of institutions, through state-imposed communist ideology, also affected the SRC....

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Societies exist in Britain, Switzerland and the USA to promote the playing and the study of viols. The British society was founded in 1948; its presidents have been Jack Westrup and Nathalie Dolmetsch, and Gordon Dodd was prominent in its organization. In 1998 the president was Alison Crum. The society has indexed sources and supervised an edition of Jenkins's consort music. It holds lectures and discussions and issues a newsletter and an annual journal, ...

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From 1871, when Wagner chose Bayreuth for his festival, a number of subscription schemes came into existence with the aim of supporting the project. In an open letter of 16 June 1882 to Friedrich Schön, Wagner proposed a foundation to assist financially those who would benefit from a visit to the festival but who would otherwise be unable to attend. On 14 May 1883, three months after Wagner’s death, the Allgemeiner Richard-Wagner-Verband was formed to coordinate the enterprise and by 1886 there were over 200 branches in Germany and many other countries. The Bayreuther Blätter (begun in 1878 under the editorship of Hans von Wolzogen) became its newsletter. The Verband was dissolved in December 1938 and re-established in Hanover as the Richard Wagner-Verband in 1947; its primary function is still to subsidize visits to the festival by young musicians, theatre directors and technicians nominated by the affiliated societies. In 1998 110 societies were affiliated, mostly German, but also representing Austria, Britain, France, Sweden, Russia, Ukraine, Spain, North and South America and Australia....

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British organization. It came into being in 1936, when a number of choirs in the London Labour Choral Union and Co-operative Musical Association (then embracing some 44 choirs and five orchestras) came together to ‘coordinate workers’ musical activity’. Their need was music that reflected the world outlook of their members and the means to create and perform such music. The objects of the WMA are to provide opportunities and means for people to develop their musical instincts and tastes and so to improve the level of their musical understanding as a result of their own strivings and experiences, rather than accept uncritically standards set by commercial or other interests. It sets out to encourage the composition and performance of music which expresses the ideals and aims of humanity for an improvement of society where social justice is seen as being the norm. Around 1939 it issued records through the Topic...

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Carolyn Livingston

An organization that provides concerts and other musical resources to children. Young Audiences was founded after a children’s concert and discussion by yehudi Menuhin at the home of Nina P. Collier in Baltimore in 1950. The program spread to other cities. Funding comes from the National Endowment for the Arts and other donors....

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