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Article

John Shepard

revised by Karen M. Bryan

A society founded by Owen C. Cash in Oklahoma in 1938 as the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber Shop Quartet Singing in America (SPEBSQSA). The organization was the first to promote and preserve barbershop as an art form. Its goal was to promote barbershop singing among men of all ages. The society “perpetuates and celebrates harmony in the barbershop style; promotes fellowship and friendship among men of good will; provides the opportunity to experience the joy of four-part a cappella singing; and introduces and sustains music in the lives of people everywhere.” In ...

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Maureen Mahon

[BRC]

American arts organization founded in New York in October 1985 and in Los Angeles in 1989. It was formed by African American musicians, artists, and music industry professionals based in New York in response to the race-based assumptions about music-making that dominated the 1980s. The BRC addresses the racial segregation of music in the recording industry and provides an outlet for African American rock musicians to develop and promote their craft. Its co-founders were the guitarist Vernon Reid, the writer Greg Tate, and the artist manager Konda Mason. A non-profit organization run by volunteers, it stages concerts, sponsors panel discussions, produces recordings, and hosts a radio show in order to draw attention to the breadth of musical sounds and styles engaged by African American musicians.

The BRC argues against the recording industry’s practice of limiting African American musicians to rhythm-and-blues and dance music. A primary reason for the formation of the BRC was to support Reid’s efforts to win a recording contract for his hard-rock band Living Colour. To address the common view held by black and white recording industry executives and music fans that black people were not interested in rock and that rock was white music, BRC members invoked a historical argument that recalled the African American roots of rock and roll. Articulating their position in the ...

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Dena J. Epstein

Trade organization founded in New York in 1855 by 27 leading music publishers in reaction to steps taken by the New York firm William Hall & Sons to halve the list prices of noncopyrighted music. The member publishers of the group, which included Oliver Ditson in Boston, S. Brainard & Sons in Cleveland, and Horace Waters in New York, were able to reach a compromise whereby the prices for this music would be reduced by only 20%. The board issued a Complete Catalogue of Sheet Music and Musical Works (1870/R), a comprehensive list of all the works published by its members and the closest the industry had come to producing a list of music in print. After a slow decline, the board held its last meeting in 1895; it was succeeded in the same year by the Music publishers association of the united states . Any allusions to the Music Publishers’ Association of the Music Publishers’ Board of Trade in historical materials published before ...

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A UK society that aims to further the study of music and dance from all parts of the world from an ethnomusicological perspective. The organization was initially formed in 1973 as an affiliated national committee of the International Folk Music Council on the instigation of Peter Cooke. When the parent organization became the ...

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Stephen Trowell

Society founded in 1978 by Peter Middleton (who became its chairman). Although taking inspiration from the now defunct society of the same name founded in 1918 by Arthur Eaglefield-Hull, it has no direct connection with it. The present society's objective is to promote interest in the music of lesser-known British composers; the emphasis is on composers no longer living and those without their own supporting organizations. The society's worldwide membership comprises both musicians and non-musicians. It carries out its objectives through publications, recordings, research, competitions and occasional concerts. The society's opera project of 1985 resulted in performances of operas by Arthur Bliss, Stanford, Smyth, Boughton and MacCunn. Biennial competitions began in 1988 with piano awards. Later events included string (1990), song (1992), woodwind (1994) and organ (1996) awards providing opportunities for young musicians. The society became a registered charity in 1995. Its publications include works on Arnold Cooke, British song and British opera; among its recordings are works by York Bowen, Foulds, John Joubert, Moeran and Ernest Walker. It is run by a volunteer committee and has no permanent financial support....

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Austrian, German and American organizations. After World War I numerous Bruckner societies were established in Austria and Germany; the one founded in Leipzig in 1925 became the International Bruckner Society (Ger. Internationale Bruckner-Gesellschaft), based in Vienna, in 1929. It published the periodical Bruckner-Blätter until 1940 and collaborated with the Österreichische Nationalbibliothek in publishing the earlier volumes of Robert Haas's complete Bruckner edition. Nationalist propaganda among the German-speaking parts of the society led to its decline and in 1939 it became simply the Deutsche Bruckner-Gesellschaft, ceasing its activity soon afterwards. A second international society, again based in Vienna, published Mitteilungsblatt der Internationalen Bruckner-Gesellschaft from 1971. The Bruckner Society of America was founded in 1931 to ‘develop in the public an appreciation of Bruckner, Mahler, and the other moderns’; it publishes the periodical Chord and Discord (1932–41, 1947–) and has awarded medals to Koussevitzky, Toscanini and other outstanding conductors of Bruckner....

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The music department is a part of the Research Institute of the Arts, which also includes Fine Art Studies, Theatre Studies, Screen Arts Studies (after 1988), and Architectural Studies (since 2010). The music department existed independently until 1988 as an Institute of Music. The Institute of Music was established in 1948 as the Research Institute of Music with the Museum at the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences with two staff members: Petko Staynov (director) and Andrey Stoyanov. The task of the Institute of Music is to collect, preserve, and publish the Bulgarian folksong heritage. Subsequently the collectors and researchers of folk songs and traditions Ivan Kachulev, Andrey Andreev (1950), Rayna Katsarova, and Elena Stoin (1951) were appointed at the Institute. A separate section for folk music was established at the Institute, led by Rayna Katsarova (1952–67) and, since 1967, Prof. Kaufmann. In 1952 the first volume of the first research journal of the Institute, ...

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Organization established in Dunfermline in 1913 for ‘the improvement of the well-being of the masses of the people of Great Britain and Ireland’. The trust's first undertaking was the completion of a scheme, begun by Andrew Carnegie, for the installation of organs in over 3800 churches and chapels. Between 1916 and 1929 it financed the publication of previously unknown Tudor music and published 56 new works, including Vaughan Williams's A London Symphony, Holst's Hymn of Jesus and works by Bantock and Boughton. The trust commissioned and financed the production of Vaughan Williams's Folksongs of the Four Seasons (1950) and Malcolm Williamson’s The Brilliant and the Dark (1965). Although primarily concerned since 1935 with amateur music, the trust gave emergency help to professional groups during the war years. Beneficiaries have included the English Folk Dance and Song Society, the British Federation of Music Festivals, the Standing Conference for Amateur Music, the National Federation of Music Societies, the Rural Music Schools Association, the Amateur Music Association, the British Federation of Brass Bands, the British Federation of Young Choirs, and Contemporary Music Making for Amateurs. In ...

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Jonathan Spencer Jones

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Article

Suzanne Flandreau

[CBMR]

The Center for Black Music Research (CBMR) was founded in 1983 at Columbia College Chicago by Samuel A. Floyd, Jr. Its mission has remained the same since its inception: to document, preserve, and promote the music of the African Diaspora. This mission is accomplished through publications, conferences and symposia, performances, research fellowships, and the Library and Archives, housing books and research collections.

The Center’s flagship publication, Black Music Research Journal (1980–), antedates Floyd’s move to Columbia College. The Center has also published Lenox Avenue (1995–1999), the scholarly journal for a grant-funded project which explored music’s role in the arts of the African Diaspora. Various newsletters, including Black Music Research Newsletter/CBMR Bulletin (1977–1990), and CBMR Digest (1990–) informed members about the Center’s activities. Kalinda! (1994–1997), Stop-Time (1998–2000), and Cariso! (2003–2006) were published for specific grant-funded projects. The Center’s publications also include a bibliographic and reference series consisting of five CBMR monographs, ...

Article

John M. Geringer

Article

John Shepard

Organization founded in 1954 by Eleanor Belmont and sponsored by the Metropolitan Opera National Council. Its 2000 members included opera companies and workshops, professionals involved with opera, and interested individuals. It provided information about performance material and repertory, and offered a wide range of services including advising on organization, public relations, and fund-raising techniques. From 1959 it published a bulletin (quarterly from 1971–2), several complete issues of which consist of important directories: Opera Companies and Workshops in the United States and Canada (annually from 1962), Directory of American Contemporary Operas (1967 and supplements), Directory of English Opera Translations (3/1974 and supplements), Directory of Operas and Publishers (1976), Career Guide for the Young American Singer (3/1978 and quarterly addenda), and Directory of Sets and Costumes for Rent: OperasOperettas—Musicals (3/1979 and annual addenda). The service ceased operations in October 1990; its information and research functions are continued by ...

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Peter Dickinson

A program for study, research, and performance of American music, based at Keele University, Staffordshire, England. It was founded in 1974 by Peter Dickinson, the first professor of music at the university’s newly established department of music. The center, which housed an excellent collection of American music materials, sponsored the Ives centenary concerts (1974) and three international conferences (1975, 1978, and 1983, the last in collaboration with the Society for American Music, then called the Sonneck Society); in 1975 it introduced an MA in American music. Dickinson departed in 1984 and David Nicholls taught at Keele from 1987 to 2000. The center is no longer active as a result of university restructuring.

P. Dickinson: “Recent Research on Musical Traditions of the United States: a View from Britain,” IMSCR XII: Berkeley 1977, ed. D. Heartz and B. Wade (Kassel, 1981) P. Dickinson: “British-American Interactions: Composers and Students,” MT...

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Michael H.S. van Eekeren

A non-profit organization promoting the work of Dutch composers and musicians. Although there are other promoters of Dutch music in the Netherlands, CNM is unique in the range of its support. It concerns itself with contemporary and older music, with improvised and amateur music; it produces CDs and books, organizes concerts in the Netherlands, stimulates educational projects and collaborates extensively with Dutch public radio stations.

CNM started its activities in the mid-1970s as Bumafonds (BFO), a subsidiary of the Dutch composers' rights organization BUMA. During a major reorganization in 1991 it acquired its present name. Since then its activities have become both more intense and more diverse. 1992 saw the introduction of the record label NM Classics, in close cooperation with Radio Netherlands, to release recordings of Dutch music of all periods, played mainly by Dutch musicians. In the same year the Bibliotheek Nederlandse Muziek (Netherlands Music Archives) was initiated. This series of books includes monographs on Ton de Leeuw and Unico Wilhelm van Wassenaer, and the correspondence (...

Article

John Shepard

revised by George Boziwick

Organization devoted to the advocacy and performance of chamber music in the USA, formed in 1978. Its membership (numbering over 6000 at the beginning of the 21st century) includes professional ensembles, training institutions, composers, music businesses and individuals. Chamber Music America’s purposes are to coordinate and develop support for chamber music activities using government, corporate and private resources, and to provide information and advice. Its activities include performances, touring, educational programmes and the commissioning of new repertory. These goals are promoted through the publication of a journal (Chamber Music Magazine, which succeeded American Ensemble in 1984) and special directories (including A Directory of Summer Chamber Music Workshops). Other publications include CMA Matters, a quarterly technical assistance bulletin, and Flying Together, published three times a year, which addresses ideas and issues relating to chamber music education. The organization awards nearly $1 million each year to chamber music organizations and ensembles for project support, partnerships and grant programmes. During its annual national conference, Chamber Music America presents awards acknowledging significant contributions in the field of chamber music....