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Simon Lindley

British society, the main aim of which has always been to publish performing editions of church music of all schools. It was founded in 1906 to assist clergymen in selecting and performing church music. It also did valuable work organizing lectures, rehearsals and courses. Among early members were Robert Bridges, Hugh Allen and Walford Davies. The first chairman was Henry Hadow, whose successors have included H.C. Colles and E.H. Fellowes. In 1928 its educational tasks were largely taken over by the School of English Church Music (later renamed the Royal School of Church Music). Since then the society has concentrated almost entirely on publishing, most recently through Oxford University Press. Its honorary general editors have included Watkins Shaw (chairman of the society from 1979 to 1987), Peter le Huray, David Lumsden, Richard Marlow and Richard Lyne. Among the society’s publications are many anthems by Purcell and a substantial corpus of 18th-century music....

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(CBDNA)

American professional organization that began as a committee of the Music Educators National Conference (MENC). The Committee on College and University Music, under the leadership of William Revelli, met independently in Chicago in 1938. The group met again in December 1941 and formed the University and College Band Conductors Conference, an organization dedicated to serve the interests of bandmasters teaching in institutions above the high school level. A Declaration of Principles was formulated, principally by Mark Hindsley, by which the members dedicate themselves to the teaching, performance, study and cultivation of music, with particular focus on the wind band medium. The name of the organization was changed to the College Band Directors National Association in 1947. The Principles were revised in 2005, with a Statement of Purpose added. The association published fourteen issues of the CBDNA Journal from 1984 to 2000, and currently publishes the CBDNA Report.

R. Lasko: A History of the College Band Directors National Association...

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Rita H. Mead

[CMS]

American organization established in 1957 to provide a forum for addressing interdisciplinary issues within music in higher education and for examining broader educational concerns. Membership is open to teachers of music in colleges, universities and conservatories in the USA and Canada. The society sponsors annual meetings with symposia and concerts and publishes a newsletter and a biannual journal, the ...

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Richard Johnston

Guitar, mandolin, and ukulele manufacturer. It was founded in Houston, Texas, in 1976, by Bill Collings (b Aug 9, 1948; d Austin, TX, July 14, 2017), who had moved from Ohio to Texas following a failed attempt at medical school. After building a few guitars and some banjos, Collings moved to Austin in 1979. His background as a machinist led him to emphasize precise jigs and fixtures even when he was working out of a small single-car garage. Demand for Collings guitars, specifically for updated versions of Martin and Gibson flat-top styles from the 1930s, prompted his move to a 1,000-square-foot shop in 1989. Two woodworkers were hired, including Bruce Van Wart, who is still in charge of wood selection and top voicing on the firm’s acoustic guitars. By this time, production had increased to a level that allowed sales to a few retailers.

In late 1991 the company relocated to a much larger facility on the outskirts of Austin, and the number of Collings guitar models, and employees, began to grow. Bill Collings was one of the first flat-top guitar builders to offer fully carved arch-top models as well. These deluxe jazz guitars were quickly accepted as the equals of those from premier American builders, and they sold for similar prices; but only a few were completed each year. Collings was also one of the first small, independent guitar companies to incorporate CNC (computer numerical control) carving machines for building both guitar parts and the precise tooling to aid in their assembly, which is still done by hand. One of the signature differences between the Collings models and the Gibson and Martin originals that inspired them is that Collings uses an unglued bolted mortise and tenon neck joint, rather than a traditional dovetail....

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[CPEMC]

The Columbia-Princeton Electronic Music Center was the most important electronic music studio in the United States for several decades after its founding in 1959. Its roots can be traced to the work of composers Otto Luening and Vladimir Ussachevsky at Columbia University. In 1955 they traveled to Europe on a Rockefeller Foundation Grant to meet like-minded composers who had set up studios in Europe. After seeing the Rca electronic music synthesizer at the Sarnoff Center of the RCA Laboratories in New Jersey, Luening and Ussachevsky turned once again to the Rockefeller Foundation. Their initial idea was to set up a council with other universities to create a pilot project in electronic music; instead, they came to an agreement with Princeton University, where Milton Babbitt showed an interest in such electronic possibilities. The Rockefeller Foundation awarded a $175,000 grant in November 1958 to be used by Columbia and Princeton to set up a common studio, hire technicians and office staff, and purchase studio and concert equipment. Grant support helped pave the way to obtain the RCA synthesizer, which was installed in ...

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A group of composers of music for the working class. The Collective, which grew out of a seminar in the writing of mass songs organized in 1933 by Jacob Schaefer, Leon Charles and Cowell, sought to make an American contribution to the international working-class music movement then flourishing in Europe through the work of writers such as Brecht and composers such as Eisler. At first a part of the Pierre Degeyter Club (named after the composer of the Internationale), the group soon became independent; for some time its members held weekly discussions in which general musical and political ideas were aired and new works held up to scrutiny. The journal of the American Music League, Unison, in 1936 listed Blitzstein as secretary of the Collective and the following as members or former members: Lan Adomian, Norman Cazden, Robert Gross, Herbert Howe, Alex North, Earl Robinson, Leon Charles, Jacob Schaefer and Elie Siegmeister. Not mentioned were some, such as Charles Seeger and H.L. Clarke, who for professional reasons did not want their work with the group widely known (several, including Seeger, Siegmeister and Clarke, used pseudonyms for the songs they wrote for the Collective)....

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B.C. Vermeersch

Organization formed in 1935 by Ashley Pettis, with funding by the WPA's Federal Music Project, to present the work of emerging American composers; it has also been known as the Composers’ Forum-Laboratory. It sponsored concerts that included forums, or moderated question-and-answer sessions involving the audience; this format became popular with other WPA composer organizations and universities. The first concert was held on ...

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Eric Blom and Beverly Wilcox

(Fr.: ‘sacred’ or ‘witty’ concert

A concert series founded in Paris in 1725 by Anne Danican Philidor, initially to perform instrumental music and sacred works with Latin texts during Holy Week and feast days when the theatres were closed. Secular works with French texts were sung in special concerts français from 1728 to 1733, and in regular programmes from 1786 to the end of the series. The Concert Spirituel was at the centre of Paris’s non-operatic musical life until the founding of the Concert des Amateurs (1769). The last director, Bertheaume, abandoned the enterprise after the 13 May 1790 performance. Concerts spirituels, not connected to the original series but consisting of programmes on the Parisian model, or simply of sacred music, had been given in Vienna and other European centres beginning in the late 18th century; in Paris, theatre orchestras and concert societies began giving them during the French Revolution. They continued during periods of royalism and eventually became part of the tradition of the Société des Concerts du Conservatoire....

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American organization founded in 1975 under the aegis of the American Symphony Orchestra League; it became independent in 1985. The guild is devoted to advancing the art of conducting and to serving the artistic and professional needs of its members. Its journal, published twice a year, includes scholarly articles on the history and craft of conducting, as well as lists of errata in the scores and parts of standard orchestral and choral works. The guild also publishes the quarterly Podium Notes and a monthly bulletin of current vacancies in the field. In addition to annual conferences, seminars and workshops, the guild presents the Theodore Thomas Award to conductors who have made significant contributions to the art and to the education of young conductors, and administers the Thelma A. Robinson Award in Conducting for the National Federation of Music Clubs. In 1998 the guild had approximately 1900 members in more than 30 countries....

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Alan L. Spurgeon

Professional organization for Dalcroze teachers. The organization promotes the artistic and pedagogical principles of Emile Jacques-Dalcroze (1865–1950), a Swiss composer and teacher whose approach to music education consists of three components: eurythmics, which teaches concepts of rhythm, structure, and musical expression through movement; solfége, which develops an understanding of pitch, scale, and tonality through activities emphasizing aural comprehension and vocal improvisation; and improvisation, which develops an understanding of form and meaning through spontaneous musical creation using movement, voice, and instruments. Dalcroze intended that the three subjects be intertwined so that the development of the inner ear, an internal muscular sense, and creative expression might work together to form the core of basic musicianship. The Dalcroze Society of America began to take shape in 1969 with informal gatherings in New Jersey and New York City, and was incorporated in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1978. It is affiliated with the Féderation Internationale des Enseignants de Rhythmique, headquartered at the Institut Jaques-Dalcroze in Geneva, Switzerland. The American society publishes the ...