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(Danish Musicological Society)

A society founded in 1954 by J.P. Larsen, Nils Schiørring, Henrik Glahn and Sven Lunn to promote musicology in Denmark, through publications and lectures, and to be a link with similar organizations abroad. It arranged congresses of Scandinavian musicologists at Copenhagen (1958), Århus (1966) and Askov (...

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English organization. It was founded in 1962 to promote a wider knowledge and appreciation of the music of Frederick Delius and to encourage the performance and recording of his works. Delius's amanuensis Eric Fenby (1906–97) was the society's first president, succeeded in 1997 by Felix Aprahamian. It has affiliated associations in the USA and France, and its members include leading Delius scholars and performers. The society organizes lectures and concerts in London and elsewhere, sponsors recordings and three times a year publishes the authoritative ...

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Pamela M. Potter

German organization for the promotion of musicology. It was founded in 1918 on the initiative of Hermann Abert to replace the International Music Society, disbanded at the outbreak of Word War I, and to serve as the central scholarly society for German-speaking musicologists. Its journal, the Zeitschrift für Musikwissenschaft, was established in 1918 under the editorship of Alfred Einstein. Plagued by the postwar hyperinflation, the society nevertheless managed to stage a scholarly conference in Leipzig in 1925, and thereafter it oversaw the series Publikationen älterer Musik, with Theodor Kroyer as general editor. Shortly after the Nazis came to power, Einstein was dismissed as editor of the journal because he was a Jew. The society's president, Arnold Schering, then completely restructured the organization on the Nazi ‘leadership principle’, renaming it the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Musikwissenschaft. The Staatliches Institut für Deutsche Musikforschung, established in 1935, gradually took over many of the society's functions, including the publication of the ...

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Johan Kolsteeg

Dutch organization based in Amsterdam. It was set up in 1947 with assistance from the Stichting Nederlandse Muziekbelangen (Foundation for Netherlands Musical Interests) and central government, with the aim of documenting and publishing modern Dutch music. This move was prompted by the loss of a number of scores, including some by Willem Pijper, in the bombing of Rotterdam in May 1940. The microfilm archives of Dutch works created at that time formed the basis of the Donemus collection after the war. The founders of Donemus (whose name is an abbreviation of ‘Documentatie in Nederland voor Muziek’) included C. Wiessing, H.E. Reeser and H. Reinink. The foundation grew under the directorship of André Jurres (1952–74), who in his various international posts did much to promote Dutch music. Around 10,000 works by some 550 Dutch composers are now available through Donemus, as well as biographical information on the composers, press releases and programme notes. Performance material of all the documented works is available on request, and scores of a limited number of works are issued. Donemus has published the journals ...

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Maud Karpeles and Alain Frogley

English organization, formed in 1932 by the amalgamation of the Folk-Song Society and the English Folk Dance Society.

Maud Karpeles, revised by Alain Frogley

The Folk-Song Society was founded in London in 1898 by a group of leading musicians in order to direct ‘the collection and preservation of Folk Songs, Ballads and Tunes and the publication of such of these as may be advisable’. Between 1899 and 1931 the society published a journal (JFSS); its 31 issues constitute a major source of English folksong transcriptions and associated scholarship, contributed by pioneers in the field such as Lucy Broadwood, Anne Gilchrist, Percy Grainger, Maud Karpeles, Frank Kidson, E.J. Moeran, Cecil Sharp and Ralph Vaughan Williams. Although concerned primarily with English folksong, the journal also included Gaelic songs.

The English Folk Dance Society was founded by Cecil Sharp in 1911 ‘with the object of preserving and promoting the practice of English folk-dances in their true traditional form’. Using dances collected by Sharp and others as a basis, the society concentrated initially on performance and educational activities rather than publication, offering classes, courses, displays and lectures, training teachers, and granting certificates of proficiency; it also fostered country dancing as a social activity. Local branches, under the supervision of the central headquarters, were established throughout England and (from ...

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John Barnes, Charles Beare and Laurence Libin

Faking musical instruments can involve such acts as creating an entirely new deceptive object, rebuilding an instrument with intent to deceive, conflating parts from different sources to form an instrument with a fictitious history, or forging an inscription on an instrument (and producing false documentation) in order to associate it with an advantageous name or period. A successful faker needs to know what customers want and the extent of their historical knowledge. Fakes can thus shed light on those who were deceived as well as on those responsible for deception. Partly to discourage misrepresentation, during the Middle Ages European trade guilds began to register makers’ marks and require their use on products; bells were perhaps the first instruments to bear such identification. Despite continuing efforts to suppress the practice, and improving methods of detection, faking and forgery, especially of valuable instruments sought by collectors as investments, continue to flourish.

Instruments of the famous Ruckers family, enlarged and redecorated to satisfy contemporary taste and musical requirements, were in demand in the 18th century, particularly in Paris. Since the alterations concealed much of the original material and involved replacement of many parts, it was not difficult for those engaged in this trade to satisfy the market without actually starting from an original Ruckers instrument. Several workshop inventories taken for legal purposes refer frankly to counterfeit Ruckers harpsichords....

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Finnish organization. Founded in 1916, its activities centre on publishing and the organization of national congresses, including the International Sibelius Congress, held every four years. The society publishes the quarterly periodical Musiikki and a series of Finnish musicological dissertations, Acta Musicologica Fennica, several of which have been translated into English.

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Tatjana Marković

The first Serbian choral society in Serbia proper, founded in 1853 as the Belgrade Choral Society (Beogradsko pevačko društvo, henceforth BCS), renamed in 1929 as the First BCS. Working under the auspices of the royal family Obrenović, it was originally a male choir, later a mixed choir, and included a music school. Due to the lack of choir compositions in the Serbian language during the first years of BCS’s work, with Milan Milovuk, the repertoire was based on songs by German, Czech, Russian, and Hungarian composers. The national orientation, resulting in arrangements and stylizations of folk melodies and other compositions, was encouraged by Stevan Todorović, at various times a board member or the president and the main ideologist of the choral society, especially during the engagement of the most prominent Serbian composers as conductors, including Kornelije Stanković, Davorin Jenko, and Josif Marinković, culminating with Stevan Mokranjac. Mokranjac promoted his own choral music, as well as that of his contemporaries and predecessors, not only in the capital of Serbia and the places where a dispersed Serbian population lived (in what is now Vojvodina, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Montenegro, and Macedonia), but also in Greece, Hungary, Bulgaria, the Ottoman Empire/Turkey, Russia, and Germany, performing concerts for the kings, emperors, and a sultan with great success. This peak in BCS history (...

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A non-profit organization that exists to educate the public about traditional, contemporary, and multicultural folk music and dance and to promote, support, and advocate for the businesses and community that support it. Clark and Elaine Weissman of the California Traditional Music Society convened a meeting in Malibu, California, in January 1989 that resulted in the creation of a US-Canadian organization then called the North American Folk Music & Dance Alliance. Folk Alliance produces an annual international conference at US and Canadian sites each winter, which is attended by approximately 2000 people. The event includes educational workshops, oral history programs, hundreds of official and unofficial artist showcases, an exhibit hall, speeches, and the presentation of the Elaine Weissman Lifetime Achievement Awards. Award recipients have included Pete Seeger, Elizabeth Cotten, Doc Watson, and Joan Baez. Folk Alliance provides an umbrella 501(c)(3) program for American folk music organizations, opportunities to obtain health insurance, and other services to an increasingly diverse and younger membership of roughly 3000. Folk Alliance has been headquartered on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus, in Washington, DC, and currently in Memphis, with relocation to Kansas City anticipated by ...

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Gary Galván

Designated as tax-exempt, nonprofit organizations by the US Internal Revenue Code, foundations are further distinguished as either public charities or private foundations. Legally, public charities must receive at least one third of their support from a variety of sources such as active fundraising from the general public, gifts, grants, membership fees, and gross receipts for services related to their specified discipline. Public charities may provide support to other organizations or fund their own philanthropic endeavors. Conversely, private foundations typically derive funds from endowments provided by individuals, families, or corporations. Private foundations enjoy more narrow control over philanthropic direction, but they also face more legislative restrictions with fewer tax benefits.

Since the first grant-making foundations appeared in the early 20th century, nonprofit organizations proliferated throughout the 20th century. During the first decade of the 21st century, expenses reported by nonprofits steadily outpaced their gross domestic product. Out of over 313,000 public charities and nearly 85,000 private foundations reporting to the Internal Revenue Service in ...

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A society founded in Britain in 1946 to commemorate and continue the work of Francis W. Galpin on early musical instruments. Among its founding members were Anthony Baines, Philip Bate, Robert Donington, Eric Halfpenny, Edgar Hunt and Lyndesay Langwill; the first president was Sir Jack Westrup. It set out to further the study of the history, construction, development and use of musical instruments, and to preserve and make available material about instruments of the past. The society, though not directly concerned with performance, has asserted a considerable influence on performing styles, on the study of early techniques and on the revival of interest in period instruments. It has organized exhibitions of British musical instruments, and in 1959 held a joint congress with the International Association of Music Libraries in Cambridge. In 1999 the society had about 1000 members. It has published The Galpin Society Journal annually since 1948 and a ...

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Viennese music society. Founded officially in 1814 (succeeding the Gesellschaft Adeliger Frauen, founded in 1812), it organized the foundation of a conservatory in 1817. Originally it had an amateur orchestra; now it organizes concerts at the Musikverein with local or visiting orchestras, as well as recitals. It has an important music collection. ...

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[Society for Music Research]

An organization founded in 1946 in Germany to bring together musicologists, church musicians, music teachers, performers and amateur musicians, to promote musical research, to publish information, and to support the cultivation of associated studies and international musicological cooperation. This aim is achieved by three means: international congresses, which have been held in 1949 (Rothenburg), 1950 (Lüneburg), 1953 (Bamberg), 1956 (Hamburg), 1962 (Kassel), 1966 (Leipzig), 1970 (Bonn), 1974 (Berlin), 1981 (Bayreuth), 1985 (Stuttgart), 1993 (Freiburg) and 1998 (Halle); the formation of special groups within the society to study specific topics; and the publication of the periodical Die Musikforschung (1948–) and the monograph series Musikwissenschaftliche Arbeiten. The latter covers a wide variety of topics and includes Richard Schaal’s Verzeichnis deutschsprachiger musikwissenschaftlicher Dissertationen 1861–1960 (Kassel, 1963; suppl. 1974). Friedrich Blume was the first president; he was succeeded by K.G. Fellerer, Martin Ruhnke, Ludwig Finscher, Carl Dahlhaus, Rudolf Stephan, Klaus W. Niemöller and Christoph Mahling....