121-140 of 260 results  for:

  • Music Business, Institutions and Organizations x
  • Scholarly and Professional Societies x
Clear all

Article

[IRCAM]

Music research institute in Paris. In 1970 President Georges Pompidou of France invited the composer and conductor Pierre Boulez to establish a centre for research into new music and associated technologies, to be situated in Paris adjacent to the Centre Pompidou. Seven years later IRCAM became fully operational with Boulez as director, a post he held until 1992 when it passed to Laurent Bayle. Boulez conceived IRCAM as a multi-disciplinary centre, and it was initially organized into five distinct areas – electro-acoustics, computer, pedagogy, instruments and voice – each headed by a specialist. This devolved arrangement proved problematic; a reorganization in 1980 and another in 1984 resulted in a more streamlined structure which, while preserving most of the original objectives, has focussed primarily on two areas, computer music production and computer music research.

Because its management has been able to make policies with few external constraints, IRCAM has fostered a strikingly broad range of musical activities. Artistic aims and objectives have predominated in determining the course of technical research. This climate has brought significant dividends in the form of new tools for computer music composition and new works for the genre. Over the years the development of technical resources has progressed from highly specialized hardware tools such as the 4X digital audio processor, built in the first instance to meet the musical requirements of Boulez for his major work ...

Article

Article

Michael D. Worthy

Article

Danica Petrović

Serbian musicology institute founded by composer Petar Konjović in Belgrade within the SASA in 1948. As the first director, Konjović proposed three main fields of research: a) the history of Serbian music from the Middle Ages to the end of the 19th century; b) contemporary Serbian music and current musicological questions; and c) Serbian folk music. The first members of the Institute were well known Belgrade musicians. The first Belgrade musicologists and ethnomusicologists were only beginning their education at that time. The work of the institute was done by a small number of researchers during the first six decades of its existence. These researchers wrote the first history of Serbian music and the first monographs of Serbian composers; initiated the studies of the aesthetics of music in Serbia; established the Byzantine roots of the Serbian Chant and the continuity of its development over the previous two centuries; and worked on the dynamic developments in Serbian music in the 20th century. The ethnomusicological research focused on Serbian vocal, instrumental, and dance traditions....

Article

Article

[IAWM]

International organization created in 1995 through the merging of the International Congress on Women in Music (ICWM), American Women Composers (AWC) and the International League of Women Composers (ILWC). The International Alliance for Women in Music aims to build on the work of the three original organizations in celebrating and encouraging the activities of women in music.

The League of Women Composers was founded by composer Nancy Van de Vate in 1975 and renamed the International League of Women Composers in 1979. In the words of its founder, the ILWC aimed ‘to create change and to provide a larger number of women musicians their first real opportunity to enter the professional mainstream’. At the time of the merger it was a networking organization operating in over 36 countries, with a well-established journal. The ILWC supervised various projects, including the publication of a directory of music by women, several radio series, an association with Arsis Press (which specializes in the publication of music by women) and a competition for student composers....

Article

[IASPM-US]

The US branch of the International Association for the Study of Popular Music (founded in 1981) promotes research and analysis of popular music. With the guidance of organization leaders such as Harris Berger, Paul Fischer, Reebee Garofalo, Charles Hamm, Anahid Kassabian, Portia Maultsby, and Robert Walser, IASPM-US has embraced the philosophy that the study of popular music is both serious and vital, whether in the areas of personal, collective and geographic identity, or in the realms of technology, economics, politics, and sociology. The organization is built on the principle that popular music has been and remains one of the most important and influential forms of art and communication.

IASPM-US, a 501 (c)(3) organization, is an interdisciplinary association that provides a virtual and physical gathering place for kindred spirits from various backgrounds—music, communications, English, history, cultural studies, sociology, and more—to share and explore their common passion for and abiding interest in popular music. In addition, it remains committed to its founders’ goal of not limiting membership to those strictly from academic circles; journalists, musicians, independent scholars, and many others are members of the organization, which in ...

Article

(IAMIC)

A worldwide network of national organizations promoting new music. It was established in 1958, originally as a meeting of ‘National Music Centre Representatives’; IAMIC was then formed in 1962 as a constituent branch of the International Association of Music Libraries, Archives and Documentation Centres [IAML]. This affiliation continued until 1991 when IAMIC became a fully independent association under the aegis of the International Music Council. In 1999 it had 40 members, most of which are autonomous organizations with national status, giving them access to funds from a range of sources including national, regional and local government, arts councils, major foundations and copyright organizations. Music information centres have as their chief purpose the documentation and promotion at home and abroad of their national music (with emphasis generally on contemporary art music), and collect scores, parts, recordings, books, articles, analyses of compositions, interviews and press cuttings; many also issue publications and recordings. The following is a list of such centres....

Article

(IAML; Fr. Association Internationale des Bibliothèques, Archives et Centres de Documentation Musicaux, AIBM; Ger. Internationale Vereinigung der Musikbibliotheken, Musikarchive und Musikdokumentationszentren, IVMB)

An organization formed after World War II to promote international cooperation and standardization in such matters as cataloguing, standards of service, personnel training and the exchange of materials between libraries. The body was founded in Paris in 1951, after preparatory meetings in Florence (1949) and Lüneburg (1950), as the Association Internationale des Bibliothèques Musicales. In 1980 its name was changed to embrace the broader interests of music archives and documentation centres, though the acronyms have remained the same. By 1998 IAML had about 2000 individual and institutional members in 45 countries throughout the world.

The association operates through a network of Professional Branches (divided by type of library, such as archives, broadcasting, music teaching institutions, public, research), Subject Commissions (grouped by type of activity, including audio-visual materials, cataloguing, bibliography, service and training) and Working Groups for specific projects. They all meet at IAML's annual conferences (or, every third year, a congress with general assembly). Two earlier groups, the Commission on Phonothèques and the Music Information Centres branch, split off to form their own associations: the International Association of Sound and Audiovisual Archives (IASA), and the International Association of Music Information Centres (IAMIC)....

Article

[IAML-US]

American branch of an organization that fosters international cooperation and standardization in cataloging, standards of service, personnel training, and the exchange of materials between libraries. Founded in 1951, the International Association of Music Libraries, Archives, and Documentation Centres (IAML) quickly developed national branches serving as professional associations for music librarians within individual countries. The United States had the largest of the national groups by October 1952, according to IAML’s first Bulletin d’Information, though the exact date of the organization of the IAML-US branch is not documented. At the founding of IAML, however, music librarians in the USA already supported a much larger and vigorous national professional organization—the Music Library Association (MLA, organized in 1931). Historically, MLA has continued to overshadow IAML-US in its membership numbers and professional activity, thus playing a mixed role in the development of IAML-US as a commensal association within American music librarianship.

The two associations share professional goals and interests and “a powerful symbiotic relationship,” but there was no formal affiliation for 60 years. In ...

Article

(Fr. Association Internationale d'Archives Sonores et Audiovisuelles; Ger. Internationale Vereinigung der Schall- und Audiovisuellen Archive)

Organization founded in Amsterdam in 1969 to function as a medium for international cooperation between Sound archives. It has over 350 members in more than 52 countries, including representatives of the archives themselves, as well as other individuals involved with the collection, preservation and dissemination of recorded material. In addition to an annual conference, the IASA publishes the biannual IASA Journal (formerly the Phonographic Bulletin) and a quarterly Information Bulletin; a membership directory is also available. Its specialist publications include Sound Archives: a Guide to their Establishment and Development, ed. D. Lance (Milton Keynes, 1983), and Selection in Sound Archives, ed. H. Wallace (Milton Keynes, 1984), a collection of papers given at the annual conferences. In 1999 The IASA Cataloguing Rules were published (Aarhus, 1999), and they are available, together with various technical guidelines and copies of the Information Bulletin (1997–) at the IASA website: ...

Article

An international organization based in the United States dedicated to “fostering communication and fellowship of clarinetists on a worldwide basis through publishing a quarterly scholarly journal, producing an annual clarinet festival, supporting a research library with materials available to all members, and promoting other endeavors related to the clarinet and clarinet playing.” The organization was founded in Denver in 1973 as the International Clarinet Society. In 1981–82 another clarinet group, ClariNetwork International, Inc., was formed, and in 1988 the two organizations merged. The name was officially changed to the International Clarinet Association (ICA) in 1991. In 2011 its membership was about 4000, with 18% of the members coming from outside the United States.

In the fall of 1973, the organization began issuing the quarterly journal The Clarinet. Its conferences are held most often in the United States, but increasingly in Canada (since 1978) and Europe (since 1981), with one in Japan in ...

Article

Organization formed in 1921 in New York by Varèse and Salzedo to assure performances of contemporary music. Membership was open to composers, who often performed their own music. Concerts were restricted to previously unheard works, a policy that so disturbed some members that they formed the League of Composers. Before it disbanded in ...

Article

Maud Karpeles

revised by Dieter Christensen

[ICTM]

An organization formed in London in 1947, under the name International Folk Music Council (IFMC), with the aims of furthering the study of folk music and dance, and of assisting in their practice, preservation and dissemination. The first meeting was attended by delegates from 28 countries, and since 1948 annual or biennial conferences have been held, bringing together specialists in all fields of folk music; early conferences took place in Ghana and Israel as well as in Europe and the Americas. The first president of the IFMC was Vaughan Williams; he was succeeded by Jaap Kunst, Zoltán Kodály, and, after the latter’s death in 1967, Willard Rhodes, professor of music at Columbia University, followed by Klaus Wachsmann (1973–7) and Poul Rovsing Olsen (1977–82). Maud Karpeles was honorary secretary from 1947 to 1965. The council's secretariat was in London until 1967 when it moved to the Danish Folklore Archives, Copenhagen; in ...

Article

Article

[IITM]

An organization founded in West Berlin in 1963 with support from the Ford Foundation and the Berlin senate. It owed its existence to the efforts of Yehudi Menuhin, Werner Stein (the Berlin senator for art and science), Nicolai Nabokov (cultural advisor to mayor Willy Brandt), and Alain Daniélou, the institute’s first director. Originally called the International Institute for Comparative Music Studies and Documentation, the institute was renamed in 1991. Its aim was to promote the study and understanding of minority and non-European musical cultures through ethnomusicological documentation, bilateral cooperative projects, publications, scholarly symposia, festivals, workshops and courses for teachers. The IITM published over 140 records in the UNESCO Collection series which are gradually being reissued on CD. Two new CD series were begun by the institute: Musical Traditions around the World (IITM/Smithsonian/Folkways) and Living Musical Traditions (IITM/Museum Edition Hamburg). The ethnomusicological journal The World of Music was published by the institute, and has been continued by the University of Bamberg until ...

Article

[ILAM]

It was founded in 1954 by musicologist Hugh Tracey at Roodepoort, near Johannesburg, South Africa, on the basis of the archive of recordings of traditional and popular African music which he had made since 1929 in Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), South Africa and elsewhere in southern Africa. His research was sponsored from 1947 by Eric Gallo with marketing rights, and about 1000 records were issued from 1929 to 1952 under the Regal (Columbia), Gallotone, Trek, Troubadour and HMV labels. Three recordings from this period became well-known: Mbube (Wimoweh), by Solomon Linda, which was popularized by Pete Seeger and the Weavers; Skokiaan, by the Bulawayo Cold Storage Band; and Masanga, a song with guitar by Jean Bosco Mwenda from the Belgian Congo (now the Democratic Republic of the Congo).

In the early 1950s a series of recordings made in central, eastern and southern Africa from 1948 to 1970 was issued by Decca. It was continued by Gallo as the Music of Africa, extending to 25 records. From ...

Article

[IMS] (Fr. Société Internationale de Musicologie, SIM; Ger. Internationale Gesellschaft für Musikwissenschaft, IGM)

Society founded in 1927 to replace the Internationale Musikgesellschaft (International Musical Society), which had been founded by Oskar Fleischer and Max Seiffert in 1899 with the aim of promoting international musical contacts, but which had ceased to exist with the outbreak of World War I in 1914. Musicologists met internationally for the first time after the war in Basle in 1924, and when Henry Prunières, speaking in 1927 at the Beethoven centenary celebrations in Vienna, suggested that the International Musical Society be reconstituted, the idea was enthusiastically received. In September 1927 a committee, chaired by Guido Adler, met in Basle and the International Musicological Society was founded.

Basle was chosen as the headquarters of the IMS. In addition to the general assembly and council, a secretariat was established to promote the aims of the society; its functions included the arrangement of international contacts between musicologists and the establishment of a bibliographical centre. Members were informed of the society's activities through a quarterly bulletin. A year after its foundation the society already had 181 members from 23 countries. In its early years the society maintained close relations with musical performance and composition, and the first international congress (Liège, ...

Article

Anton Haefeli

revised by Reinhard Oehlschlägel

[ISCM] (Fr. Société Internationale pour la Musique Contemporaine, SIMC; Ger. Internationale Gesellschaft für Neue Musik, IGNM)

Society founded on 11 August 1922 after the Internationale Kammermusikaufführungen Salzburg 1922, a festival of modern chamber music held as part of the Salzburg Festival and organized by Rudolf Réti with the assistance of Egon Wellesz, Paul Stefan and some young Viennese composers. Over 20 composers were present, including Webern, Hindemith, Bartók, Kodály, Honegger and Milhaud. The participants were determined that this, the first international music festival after World War I, should be the first of a regular series of events enabling contemporary composers to maintain the contacts made in Salzburg and meet annually to become acquainted with recent musical events and trends. On its foundation the ISCM outlined its purpose as being a means of breaking down national barriers and personal interests and publicizing and promoting contemporary music ‘regardless of aesthetic trends or the nationality, race, religion or political views of the composer’. These aims were to be pursued through annual music festivals in different countries. The first (...

Article

(Ger. Internationale Gesellschaft für Jazzforschung)

Organization based in Graz. It was founded in 1969 by Friedrich Körner and Dieter Glawischnig. It is a society of musicologists, jazz scholars, anthropologists, teachers, performers and others interested in jazz, and its aim is the systematic exploration of jazz through musicological methods. Between 1969 and 1995, 27 volumes of the yearbook ...