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William C. Smith

revised by Peter Ward Jones

(b ?London, 1695–1705; d ?London, after1742). English music seller and publisher, father of organist and composer Benjamin Cooke. He was active in London from 1726 to 1743, and published a considerable number of vocal and instrumental works, some of them obviously pirated from other publishers, others under licence as authoritative first editions. His publications were mostly in a heavy bold style, but some were engraved in a lighter style by Thomas Cross. After Cooke’s death or retirement some of his plates were acquired by John Johnson (ii), who reissued copies from them. Cooke’s publications include Roseingrave’s XII Solos for a German Flute (1730), Handel’s Sonatas op.2 (c1733) and 42 ‘suites’ by Domenico Scarlatti in two volumes (1739). His most interesting publication, however, was that of the five books of sonatas and the 12 concertos of Corelli issued in 1732. Not only do these constitute a collected edition of the composer’s works, but all, including the concertos, were published in score expressly for study purposes, an extraordinary form of publication for instrumental music at that time. Cooke’s plates were used well into the 19th century for reissues of these works....

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W. Thomas Marrocco and Mark Jacobs

American music publishing firm, based in New York. It was founded in 1929 by Alma M. Wertheim as a non-profit-making organization for aiding and disseminating the music of American composers. Its catalogue included works by Citkowitz, Copland, Gruenberg (including his opera The Emperor Jones), Roy Harris, Piston, Sessions, Thomson, Wagenaar and Whithorne. In ...

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(b Wawrzeńczyce, 1606; d Vienna, May 21, 1674). Viennese printer of Polish birth. He studied in Kraków, where he also learnt printing and managed a small press. In 1640 he married the widow of the printer Matthäus Formica (fl 1615–39) and assumed management of his shop on the Kölnerhof; later he became a printer for the university and court book printer. In 1649 he bought the remainder of the Formica shop, including the music type of Leonard Formica (fl 1590–1615), and in 1655 he moved to a larger building on Unteren Bächerstrasse; known as the Cosmeroviushaus, it had five presses, more than 150 sets of type and a foundry. At his death his printing properties were transferred to his son Johann Christoph (1656–85) and thence, as the ‘Cosmerovische Erben’, to Johann’s widow Theresia (until 1686), Matthäus’s widow Susanna Christina (until 1698...

Article

Alan Pope

French firm of music publishers. It began in Paris in 1880 when Costallat (d 1901) went into partnership with William Enoch. Enoch Frères & Costallat were the sole agents in France for the German music publishers Litolff. In 1895 Costallat set up on his own in the rue de la Chaussée-d’Antin, and in ...

Article

Stefano Ajani

(b Naples, Dec 7, 1827; d Naples, March 30, 1879). Italian music publisher, lawyer, poet, writer and politician. He studied the piano with F. Festa, composition with Salvatore Pappalardo and also learnt some music from his father, Guglielmo Cottrau (b Paris, 9 Aug 1797; d Naples, 31 Oct 1847), a gifted amateur double bass player and director of the Girard firm. In 1846 Teodoro succeeded his father at Girard’s and in 1848 became joint owner, carrying on independently from 1855. He republished with greater success his father’s edition of Neapolitan songs, Passatempi musicali. Besides the anthology Cottrau’s much admired publications include L’ape musicale pianistica, collections of romanze, neopolitan songs, piano pieces particularly by Neopolitan composers and vocal scores of operas including Verdi’s Simon Boccanegra and Herold’s Le pré aux clercs, for which he provided a translation and promoted the Italian première at the Teatro Filarmonico, Naples (...

Article

Rita H. Mead

revised by Diane Pecknold

[CMF]

Nonprofit educational organization dedicated to preserving and disseminating the history of American country music. Established in 1964 by the Country Music Association, the two organizations initially shared a single staff, but in 1971, Bill Ivey was appointed director and the foundation became an administratively autonomous entity. In 1998, Kyle Young succeeded Ivey as director. The foundation oversees the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum and the Frist Library and Archive. The hall of fame was founded in 1961, but was housed in the Tennessee State Library until 1967, when the first museum building opened at the north end of Music Row. In 2001, the museum and foundation moved to a new building in downtown Nashville, and by 2010, comprised a staff of approximately 70 scholars, educators, curators, and librarians. In addition to the museum and library, the foundation manages the landmark RCA Studio B and Hatch Show Prints, a historic poster letterpress. The foundation’s education department organizes lectures and demonstrations in schools throughout Tennessee and the region, and the Country Music Foundation Press, in partnership with Vanderbilt University Press, publishes reprints and new works on country music. From ...

Article

County  

Benjamin J. Harbert

Record label. Established in New York in 1963 by David Freeman, County Records has helped to preserve and disseminate old-time music through re-releases of prewar string bands and field recordings. The original LP anthologies brought together 78s from Freeman’s collection of 1920s music; these artists include The Skillet-Lickers, Charlie Poole, and Uncle Dave Macon. In 1964, Freeman worked with Charles Faurot, who collected field recordings of living banjo players who played in the older clawhammer style. The best known work to come from this County series is the three volume Clawhammer Banjo. These records of Southeastern clawhammer banjo became source material for a new generation of revivalists who otherwise would not have heard these musicians. The 15 musicians recorded include Kyle Creed, Tommy Jarrell, and Wade Ward (the latter had also been recorded by folklorist Alan Lomax in 1959). In 1974, Freeman relocated County Records to the small town of Floyd, Virginia and grew the label through retail mail order. The label continues to reissue old-time and bluegrass music digitized on CDs. They also sell related books and video....

Article

William C. Smith

revised by Peter Ward Jones

English firm of music sellers and publishers, active in London from about 1833 to 1849. It published a number of important works, many from plates taken over when the firm succeeded Preston & Son, including many of Handel’s works originally issued by Walsh, Randall and others. Some of these plates were acquired by J. Alfred Novello (see Novello & Co) in 1849, after John Hollier had left the partnership. Charles Coventry was a keen advocate of Bach’s organ works, and among the firm’s original publications was the first English edition of many of the preludes and fugues in 1836, issued jointly with Cramer, Addison & Beale. Because few English organs of the time possessed pedal departments suitable for these works, they were also advertised as performable on the piano, with the pedal part being taken either by a second pianist or by a cello or double bass, for which a separate part, edited by Domenico Dragonetti, was provided. In ...

Article

Charles H. Purday

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

English firm of music publishers and, formerly,piano manufacturers active in London. The firm was founded as Cramer, Addison & Beale in 1824 when the pianist and composer J.B. Cramer (see Cramer family, §2) joined the partnership of Robert Addison (d London, 17 Jan 1868) and Thomas Frederick Beale (b ?1804 or 1805; d Chislehurst, 26 June 1863). With the addition of Cramer’s name the publication of piano music became the firm’s chief interest, and in 1830 it bought many of the plates of the Royal Harmonic Institution, which gave it works by Beethoven, Clementi, Dussek, Haydn, Hummel, Mozart, Steibelt and others. Italian songs and duets and English operas by composers such as Balfe and Benedict were soon added to the catalogue.

In 1844 Addison retired and was succeeded by William Chappell (seeChappell), and the firm then became known as Cramer, Beale & Chappell, or Cramer, Beale & Co. In ...

Article

Hans-Martin Plesske

German firm of music publishers. It was founded by August Heinrich Cranz (b Berlin, 1789; d Hamburg, 1870) in 1814 in Hamburg. His son Alwin Cranz (b Hamburg, 1834; d Vevey, 10 April 1923) took over the music publishing house in 1857 and acquired the Viennese publishing firm C.A. Spina in 1876. August Cranz was the original publisher of many works by Josef, Eduard and Johann Strauss (father and son), including Die Fledermaus, Der Zigeunerbaron and Eine Nacht in Venedig. Viennese operettas and light music (e.g. Lanner, Suppé, Millöcker) played a large part in the publishing programme. Oskar Cranz, a partner from 1896, moved the firm to Leipzig in 1897. The August Cranz publishing house lost most of its stock in 1943; the rebuilding of the firm was carried out at first in Munich and from 1949 in Wiesbaden. In 1965 the firm began producing tapes and records. The firm August Cranz of Wiesbaden had branches in Brussels, London, Paris and Vienna and was represented by agents in several countries. It was acquired by Schott in ...

Article

David Buckley

British record company. It was set up in 1984 by Alan McGee, a former British Rail clerk, and Dick Green. Creation’s first signing was the Jesus and Mary Chain, whose single Upside Down sold more than 50,000 copies in Britain, a sizable hit for a fledgling independent label. Creation acquired a reputation for developing the hottest indie bands with Primal Scream, Ride and My Bloody Valentine their main acts. However, by 1993 the label had debts of over £1 million, and McGee and Green sold a 49% stake of the company to Sony for £3.5 million, assuring the label's future. That same year McGee saw a support gig by the unknown band Oasis in 1993 and signed the band on the spot; Oasis became the label's leading group and by 1998 had sold more than 27 million records. Apart from the hit indie band Super Furry Animals, all the band's new talent was discovered by McGee and the label remained very much driven by his passions. In the late 1990s McGee became a powerful voice within the industry and participated in a number of think-tanks such as the Creative Industries Taskforce and the Music Industry Forum, which advise the government on issues affecting the British music industry. By the late 1990s Creation had also founded its own dance label, Eruption, run by the disc jockey and journalist Kris Needs. In ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?London, ?1660–65; d ?London, ?1732–5). English music engraver, printer, publisher and music seller. He was probably the son of the 17th-century engraver Thomas Cross, who engraved some frontispieces and portraits for John Playford’s publications, including the portrait of the composer John Gamble (Ayres and Dialogues, 1656), and who may have engraved some music. From 1683 to about 1710 the younger Cross often signed himself ‘Tho. Cross junior sculpt.’, as on his first known work, Purcell’s Sonnata’s of III. Parts (1683), printed for the composer. From about 1692 to about 1720 he kept a music shop in London. He was the first to issue songs in single sheet format rather than in collections, and from the 1690s a considerable number of these appeared under his imprint. At first they were engraved on copper plates, which was an expensive method considering the ephemeral nature of the sheet songs, but he later used a cheaper material, probably pewter. He had a virtual monopoly of the music engraving trade until Walsh established his business in ...

Article

Curci  

Mariangela Donà

Firm of Italian publishers. It was founded in Naples in 1912 by the brothers Giuseppe (1884–1953), Alberto (1886–1973) and Alfredo (1891–1952) Curci. Their grandfather Francesco (1824–1912) had opened a business at Naples in 1860 for the sale of musical instruments and for music copying, an activity which was then continued by his three children, Pasquale, Achille and Concetta. Pasquale’s sons, named above, started the publishing side of the ‘Casa Musicale Fratelli Curci’. This part of the business was at first known as Casa Editrice di Operette e Vaudevilles (CEDOV), and published musical comedies and operettas by Italian and foreign composers (Imre Kálmán, Oscar Straus, Jean Gilbert, Carlo Lombardo and Alberto Curci himself). The firm’s address changed in 1919 from via dei Tre Re to via Roma 304/5; in this year too, the brothers founded the society ‘Amici della Musica’ of Naples, organizing concerts by the greatest chamber musicians. With the development of the cinema as an art form, the Casa Curci began publishing film music by well-known composers including Mulè, Rossellini and Veretti....

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Dakar  

Andrew Flory

Record label. Active from 1967 to 1976, Dakar specialized in dance music and ballads performed by African American artists. Based in Chicago, Dakar was independently owned and operated by songwriter and producer Carl Davis, who was at the same time vice president of Brunswick Records, which recently had become independent. Between 1967 and 1970, while Brunswick was still part of Decca Records, Davis worked as a producer, and Dakar releases were distributed by Atlantic Records. In late 1971, Dakar became a subsidiary of Brunswick, which began to distribute Dakar’s recordings. The company is known for its releases of Chicago-based soul music. Balladeer Tyrone Davis, whose “Can I change my mind” rose to peak popularity in early 1969, was Dakar’s most notable artist; R&B artist Hamilton Bohannon was another mainstay for the label in the mid-1970s. Dakar and Brunswick were embroiled in a public payola trial in 1975 and 1976 that led to the company’s creative demise....

Article

William C. Smith

revised by Peter Ward Jones

English family of music publishers, music sellers and instrument dealers. The firm was established in London.

(b 1750; d Edinburgh, Aug 21, 1821). He founded a business in 1783 at his private house, and from there issued his first publications, including a number of operas such as Shield’s Rosina and The Flitch of Bacon. A music catalogue of 1785 announced that the copyrights and plates of these and other works had recently been purchased from William Napier; at about the same time he also purchased plates and copyrights from Charles Bennett, once the property of John Welcker. In January 1786 he moved to premises previously occupied by Samuel Babb, whose trade stock and large circulating music library Dale purchased. In 1805 he took his son William into partnership and the firm became known as Joseph Dale & Son (or Joseph & William Dale). The partnership was dissolved in ...

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Dalmas  

Geoffrey Norris

revised by Nigel Yandell

Russian firm of music publishers. The founder, H.J. Dalmas (d ?St Petersburg, 1829), was a member of the French opera troupe in St Petersburg. In 1802, with the help of Boieldieu, he opened a music shop which swiftly developed into one of the most stable Russian publishing houses of the early 19th century. Among the earliest publications were works by Boieldieu, including extracts from operas written by the composers while in St Petersburg. Dalmas was particularly noted for his various journals of French and Italian opera excerpts, including Le troubadour du nord (1804–11) and La muse cosmopolite (1827–8). He also published collections of songs (among them Nouveau choix d’airs russes, ukrainiens, kosaques, etc., 1816) and keyboard pieces, as well as a number of important individual works by Bortnyans′ky (the full score and parts of Pevets vo stane russkikh voinov, 1813), Cavos (a piano score of the opera ...

Article

W.H. Husk

revised by David Johnson and Kenneth Elliott

(b Aberdeen, Oct 27, 1800; d Georgetown, British Guiana [now Guyana], July 28, 1843). Scottish musical scholar. The son of William Dauney of Falmouth, Jamaica, he was educated at Dulwich College, London, and at Edinburgh University. He was called to the Scottish Bar in 1823. About 1839 he left Scotland for British Guiana, where he became solicitor-general.

Dauney’s importance as a scholar rests on his book Ancient Scotish Melodies from a Manuscript of the Reign of James VI (Edinburgh, 1838/R), which consists of a partial transcript of the Skene Manuscript as well as a lengthy ‘Dissertation Illustrative of the History of the Music of Scotland’ and some historical documents, also transcribed. The manuscript, in mandore tablature, was compiled about 1625 by John Skene of Hallyards, Midlothian. It contains some 115 items of which over half are Scottish native airs, or folksongs, and the rest – Scottish, English, French, Dutch and Italian – comprise ballad tunes, dance tunes and partsong arrangements. In Dauney’s time it belonged to the Advocates’ Library in Edinburgh, now the National Library of Scotland (Adv.5.2.15). Dauney’s transcription was valuable in drawing attention to early, simple versions of such Scottish tunes as ...

Article

Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(b 1800–01; d London, July 4, 1875). English music printer and publisher in London. He is first known as a general printer from about 1833. He began to publish both literary and musical works about 1844 and in 1847–8 he issued the two volumes of Davidson’s Universal Melodist, a collection of popular and standard songs of the period. At the same time he republished a collection of Dibdin’s songs, edited by George Hogarth, which had originally been printed by a different George Davidson and issued by How & Parsons in 1842. From 1850 Davidson had an enormous trade in the issue of cheap editions of popular music. He published much sheet music in the Musical Treasury series, and from 1854 he issued Davidson’s Musical Opera Books, a series of librettos with music of the principal airs. From 1860 to 1881 the business continued as the Music Publishing Co., though major sales of copyrights, plates and stock took place in ...