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[Castellioneus, Johannes]

( b c1484; d Milan, c1557). Italian printer . In 1504 he married a daughter of the printer Antonio Zarotto. His father, Zanotto da Castiglione, a sometime collaborator of Zarotto, printed some 90 books (1505–23), including an Ambrosian sacramentary and missal with music. Giovanni Antonio first printed in 1507, but with some regularity only from 1534. His 40-odd books include the first Milanese editions of instrumental music and part-music, printed in two impressions, with mediocre to excellent registration of the crisp and distinctive note forms, namely: Intabolatura de leuto de diversi autori (May 1536/R); Ruffo's Primo libro de motetti a cinque (June 1542); Mutetarum divinitatis liber primus, 5vv (RISM 1543³); and the Intavolatura di lauto … libro secondo of Francesco da Milano and P.P. Borrono (1548). Castiglione also printed Aaron's Compendiolo di molti dubbi (between 1545 and ...

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Tim Carter

(fl 1618–25). Italian printer active in Florence. Although he was printing books by December 1618, his first printed music dates from 1623 when he issued two volumes by Filippo Vitali (including Vitali’s Il secondo libro de madrigali a cinque voci). In 1625 he printed Francesca Caccini’s La liberazione di Ruggiero dall’isola d’Alcina...

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Zdeněk Culka

[Nigrin, Nygryn, Georg]

(fl Prague, 1572–1606). Czech printer. He served his apprenticeship under Kozel, probably before 1566. Between 1572 and 1606 he published many religious, philosophical, legal, medical and astronomical books, as well as sermons, felicitations and poems; he had begun printing music by 1578. He printed a series of works by the Slovenian composer Jacob Handl, as well as music by members of the Prague royal chapel (e.g. Carl Luython and Franz Sales), Johannes Nucius and such composers as Lomnický, Mitis z Limuz, Jevíčský, Barion, Knöfel and Benedikt-Nudožerský. In both volume and quality of production, Černý was one of the foremost printers of the time.

ČSHS

J. Vanický: ‘Nigrinovy hudební tisky’ [Nigrin’s musical prints], HRo, 12 (1959), 608–9 K. Chyba: Slovník knihtiskařů v Československu od nejstarších dob do roku 1860 [Dictionary of printers in Czechoslovakia from early times to 1860] (Prague, 1966), 71 P. Danek: ‘Nototiskanská cinnost Jirího Nigrina’ [The musical prints of Nigrin], ...

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Samuel F. Pogue

revised by Frank Dobbins

(b Piedmont, c1480; d Avignon, c1539–40). French printer. He began his printing career in Lyons around 1500 as an apprentice to Jacques Arnoullet. On the latter’s death in 1504 or 1505, his widow Michelette du Cayre entrusted the press to Channey, who published a book under his own name in about 1505, using Arnoullet’s type. Assuming that he would have had to be in his mid-20s for such a responsibility, he was probably born about 1480. Another book with his name as printer was published in 1510, using his printer’s mark, a copy of the Aldine anchor and dolphin, for the first time.

Because Arnoullet’s sons were coming of age and were ready to take over their father’s business, Channey petitioned the Avignon town council in late 1512 for permission to establish a printing firm there. In August 1513 the first of many books with the Avignon address appeared in print. Michelette du Cayre followed him to Avignon, where she married him....

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Roben Jones

[John Henderson ]

(b Whitehaven, TN, April 8, 1931). American singer-songwriter, producer, publisher, and entrepreneur. He began playing bluegrass while in the military and after his discharge in 1952, played at radio stations in Wheeling, West Virginia, and Boston. While enrolled in Memphis State University (from 1954), he worked nights and weekends at the Eagle’s Nest club. After working briefly for Fernwood Records, he was hired by Sun Records, where he recorded Roy Orbison, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Johnny Cash, among others. He wrote hits for several of Sun’s artists, including Johnny Cash’s singles “Ballad of a Teenage Queen” and “Guess things happen that way” (both Sun, 1958).

Clement left Sun in 1960 to became a staff producer for RCA in Nashville. In 1963 he moved to Texas, started a publishing company, and produced Dickey Lee’s hit “Patches” (Smash, 1963). After returning to Nashville in 1965, he discovered and produced Charlie Pride and wrote songs for a variety of country artists, including Pride (“Just between you and me,” RCA Victor, ...

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Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?London, late 17th century; d London, Oct 1728). English music printer and publisher. As early as 1715 he was active in London as a general printer whose production included ballads, chapbooks, labels and shopkeepers’ signs. He soon turned to music printing and issued some of the best engraved music of his period. A considerable innovator, he experimented with new methods of printing both from engraved plates and from music types. Beginning with the printing of the Suites de pièces pour le clavecin in 1720, Cluer had business relations with Handel, publishing in score nine of his operas, the first being Giulio Cesare in 1724, which was issued in the unusual format of a large pocket-size volume. Both this and the later operas are remarkable for their finely engraved title-pages and frontispieces. Other notable publications include the two volumes of A Pocket Companion for Gentlemen and Ladies (...

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Susan Bain

(b Antwerp, 1489; d Antwerp, Aug 17, 1562). South Netherlandish printer. Although active as a printer in Antwerp for more than 40 years, he did not become a member of the Guild of St Luke until 1557, towards the end of his life. In his long and prolific career (more than 170 books) he printed prognostications, ordinances, theology and devotional books, and a number of English heretical texts, printed clandestinely. On 15 September 1539 he received a six-year privilege for printing psalters with music, the first privilege to print music in the Low Countries. On 28 September of the same year he printed the first Dutch metrical psalter, Een devoot ende profitelijck boecxken (ed. D.F. Scheurleer, The Hague, 1889, 2/1977). This was followed, in 1540, by his Souterliedekens – Psalter Songs – which became immensely popular, being reprinted several times by Cock, and later by printers in both the southern and the northern Netherlands. These two publications were printed by double impression, the staves in red and the text and music in black, but with different music notation. The first used a small Roman neume typeface on a four-line staff; ...

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W.H. Husk, Frank Kidson and Peter Ward Jones

(b 1798; d London, April 7, 1887). English music publisher. He established his own firm in London in 1823. In 1868 he took his two sons Arthur and Stroud into partnership and retired in 1881, but at his death his grandson Robert M. Cocks became the proprietor and continued until his retirement in 1898 when a sale of stock took place; Augener purchased the goodwill and lease, and retained the name of the firm until 1904.

Cocks was much involved in concert management at the outset of his career and had a long association with the Hanover Square Rooms. He employed resident foreign musicians to compile and edit music. Some 16,000 works were published by the firm, including Bach’s keyboard works edited by Czerny, Beethoven’s quartets, and works by Czerny himself, Rode and Spohr, in addition to the waltzes of Johann Strauss and Lanner and contemporary English music. A number of methods and books on music included translations of important foreign treatises. A short-lived periodical, ...

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Stanley Boorman

(fl London, 1740–60). English engraver. Several engravers of this name flourished in England during the 18th century, though probably only one worked at music. His first work appears in Walsh's publication of J.F. Lampe's Songs and Duetto's in … The Dragon of Wantley (1738) and music from the same composer's Margery (1740). His most important work was for the British Melody, or The Musical Magazine, published in 15 (probably fortnightly) instalments from February 1738. It reappeared as a set, published by Cole, in 1739. This was the first of the many rivals and successors to Bickham's The Musical Entertainer. Cole's work is of a very high standard, though less flexible and imaginative than Bickham's; the latter twice referred disparagingly to Cole in his second volume. As was customary, Cole continued to reissue separate plates for several years. He also engraved the music plates for ...

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William C. Smith

revised by Peter Ward Jones

(b ?London, 1695–1705; d ?London, after1742). English music seller and publisher, father of organist and composer Benjamin Cooke. He was active in London from 1726 to 1743, and published a considerable number of vocal and instrumental works, some of them obviously pirated from other publishers, others under licence as authoritative first editions. His publications were mostly in a heavy bold style, but some were engraved in a lighter style by Thomas Cross. After Cooke’s death or retirement some of his plates were acquired by John Johnson (ii), who reissued copies from them. Cooke’s publications include Roseingrave’s XII Solos for a German Flute (1730), Handel’s Sonatas op.2 (c1733) and 42 ‘suites’ by Domenico Scarlatti in two volumes (1739). His most interesting publication, however, was that of the five books of sonatas and the 12 concertos of Corelli issued in 1732. Not only do these constitute a collected edition of the composer’s works, but all, including the concertos, were published in score expressly for study purposes, an extraordinary form of publication for instrumental music at that time. Cooke’s plates were used well into the 19th century for reissues of these works....

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(b Wawrzeńczyce, 1606; d Vienna, May 21, 1674). Viennese printer of Polish birth. He studied in Kraków, where he also learnt printing and managed a small press. In 1640 he married the widow of the printer Matthäus Formica (fl 1615–39) and assumed management of his shop on the Kölnerhof; later he became a printer for the university and court book printer. In 1649 he bought the remainder of the Formica shop, including the music type of Leonard Formica (fl 1590–1615), and in 1655 he moved to a larger building on Unteren Bächerstrasse; known as the Cosmeroviushaus, it had five presses, more than 150 sets of type and a foundry. At his death his printing properties were transferred to his son Johann Christoph (1656–85) and thence, as the ‘Cosmerovische Erben’, to Johann’s widow Theresia (until 1686), Matthäus’s widow Susanna Christina (until 1698...

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Stefano Ajani

(b Naples, Dec 7, 1827; d Naples, March 30, 1879). Italian music publisher, lawyer, poet, writer and politician. He studied the piano with F. Festa, composition with Salvatore Pappalardo and also learnt some music from his father, Guglielmo Cottrau (b Paris, 9 Aug 1797; d Naples, 31 Oct 1847), a gifted amateur double bass player and director of the Girard firm. In 1846 Teodoro succeeded his father at Girard’s and in 1848 became joint owner, carrying on independently from 1855. He republished with greater success his father’s edition of Neapolitan songs, Passatempi musicali. Besides the anthology Cottrau’s much admired publications include L’ape musicale pianistica, collections of romanze, neopolitan songs, piano pieces particularly by Neopolitan composers and vocal scores of operas including Verdi’s Simon Boccanegra and Herold’s Le pré aux clercs, for which he provided a translation and promoted the Italian première at the Teatro Filarmonico, Naples (...

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Hans-Martin Plesske

German firm of music publishers. It was founded by August Heinrich Cranz (b Berlin, 1789; d Hamburg, 1870) in 1814 in Hamburg. His son Alwin Cranz (b Hamburg, 1834; d Vevey, 10 April 1923) took over the music publishing house in 1857 and acquired the Viennese publishing firm C.A. Spina in 1876. August Cranz was the original publisher of many works by Josef, Eduard and Johann Strauss (father and son), including Die Fledermaus, Der Zigeunerbaron and Eine Nacht in Venedig. Viennese operettas and light music (e.g. Lanner, Suppé, Millöcker) played a large part in the publishing programme. Oskar Cranz, a partner from 1896, moved the firm to Leipzig in 1897. The August Cranz publishing house lost most of its stock in 1943; the rebuilding of the firm was carried out at first in Munich and from 1949 in Wiesbaden. In 1965 the firm began producing tapes and records. The firm August Cranz of Wiesbaden had branches in Brussels, London, Paris and Vienna and was represented by agents in several countries. It was acquired by Schott in ...

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Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith, Peter Ward Jones and David Hunter

(b ?London, ?1660–65; d ?London, ?1732–5). English music engraver, printer, publisher and music seller. He was probably the son of the 17th-century engraver Thomas Cross, who engraved some frontispieces and portraits for John Playford’s publications, including the portrait of the composer John Gamble (Ayres and Dialogues, 1656), and who may have engraved some music. From 1683 to about 1710 the younger Cross often signed himself ‘Tho. Cross junior sculpt.’, as on his first known work, Purcell’s Sonnata’s of III. Parts (1683), printed for the composer. From about 1692 to about 1720 he kept a music shop in London. He was the first to issue songs in single sheet format rather than in collections, and from the 1690s a considerable number of these appeared under his imprint. At first they were engraved on copper plates, which was an expensive method considering the ephemeral nature of the sheet songs, but he later used a cheaper material, probably pewter. He had a virtual monopoly of the music engraving trade until Walsh established his business in ...

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Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(b 1800–01; d London, July 4, 1875). English music printer and publisher in London. He is first known as a general printer from about 1833. He began to publish both literary and musical works about 1844 and in 1847–8 he issued the two volumes of Davidson’s Universal Melodist, a collection of popular and standard songs of the period. At the same time he republished a collection of Dibdin’s songs, edited by George Hogarth, which had originally been printed by a different George Davidson and issued by How & Parsons in 1842. From 1850 Davidson had an enormous trade in the issue of cheap editions of popular music. He published much sheet music in the Musical Treasury series, and from 1854 he issued Davidson’s Musical Opera Books, a series of librettos with music of the principal airs. From 1860 to 1881 the business continued as the Music Publishing Co., though major sales of copyrights, plates and stock took place in ...

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Miriam Miller

(b Dunwich, Suffolk, 1522; d Walden, Essex, July 23, 1584). English printer, father of Richard Day. He was one of the most successful general printers of his generation, but his music printing was almost entirely limited to two works: Certaine Notes set forth in Foure and Three Parts and The Whole Booke of Psalmes, Collected into English Metre by T. Sternhold, I. Hopkins & Others … with Apt Notes to Synge them withal, known as the Sternhold-Hopkins psalter. Certaine Notes was probably compiled before 1553 and partially printed in 1560, but it was not until 1565 that the whole anthology was completely issued, under the amended title Mornyng and Evenyng Prayer. Day first published The Whole Booke of Psalmes in 1562, under the terms of a monopoly granted to him by the crown in 1559 that gave him sole right to print the work, which became extremely popular. He had the patent of monopoly renewed in ...

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Miriam Miller

(b London, Dec 21, 1552; d before 1607). English music publisher, son of John Day. He was trained as a scholar, becoming a Fellow of King’s College, Cambridge, in 1574. Family pressures obliged him to return to his father’s business in London, and he was admitted to the Stationers’ Company in 1577. With his father he held several printing monopolies, including one that gave them sole right to print the Sternhold-Hopkins psalter, in which the metrical psalms were set to music. After his father’s death in 1584, Day never printed this work himself but assigned his rights to other printers; he authorized 46 separate printings, bringing the total printed under the monopoly to 82. The work was continually pirated and Day was involved in several legal actions. When Thomas Morley acquired a general music-printing monopoly from the queen in 1598, the terms conflicted with Day’s. Morley published Richard Allison’s ...

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Marie Cornaz

(b Lille, June 8, 1731; d Brussels, July 30, 1804). French bookseller, printer and type founder, active in the southern Netherlands. Born into a family of printers, he was the son of Henri de Boubers and Marie Catherine Gavroy. He married Marie-Thérèse Joseph Panckoucke, a sister of the French bookseller Charles-Joseph Panckoucke, and later married Marie-Thérèse Joseph d'Audenarde. A bookseller in Dunkirk by about 1747, then a printer-bookseller in Liège from 1761, he established himself in Brussels in 1768 after two years of apprenticeship with Jean-Joseph Boucherie. On 18 October 1769 he opened the first permanent bookshop in the Théâtre de la Monnaie selling librettos of lyric works, some with music. De Boubers was also a type founder, at first in partnership with Mathias Rosart, son of the printer Jacques-François Rosart. He produced new printing type in 1779 which he sold to numerous printers in the Netherlands as well as to individuals, including the Prince de Ligne. De Boubers edited some occasional pieces, two of which were published for the inauguration of Charles de Lorraine's statue in Brussels in ...

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Susan Bain

[Latius, Joannes; Latio, Giovanni]

(b Stabroeck, c1525; d Antwerp, 1566). Flemish printer. He became a citizen of Antwerp in 1545 and began to print in the same year; he served as one of the Town Printers from 1549 to 1566, being regularly mentioned in the Antwerp accounts. He printed more than 100 books reflecting the cosmopolitan life of Antwerp, including Flemish Bibles, law books, histories, classical texts, Spanish books and a dozen books by English Catholic authors. From 1554 he published a number of music books, either with the Antwerp teacher and composer Hubert Waelrant, who acted as the music editor, or on his own. Together, in the years 1554–6, Waelrant and De Laet published eight books of motets and four books of chansons by various composers. Alone, De Laet brought out a number of music publications including Lassus’s motets in 1556, the year of the composer’s visit to Antwerp; thus he was one of Lassus’s first publishers. De Laet also printed two editions of ...