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Article

Jeremy Drake

(d 1944/5). French music publisher. By acquiring the catalogues of Hachette and especially Benoît, he became the publisher of operas by Auber and Meyerbeer. These, and exclusive rights to Plaisir d’amour, enabled Deiss to publish much modern music including works by Aubert, Harsányi, Koechlin, Schmitt and, in the 1930s and 40s, Rieti, Mihalovici and Milhaud. Though opera, song and piano works formed the bulk of his catalogue, Deiss also published some symphonic and instrumental music, dance music, and music for the cinema and the music hall. Information on his life is lacking, as are precise details of his publishing house, but it is known that he was arrested by the Vichy authorities in France on account of his Jewish ancestry and sent to a German concentration camp where he was executed in ...

Article

Anne Schnoebelen

(d Oct 6, 1749). Italian music publisher and bookseller. His firm was active in Bologna for most of the 18th century and was famous in the art of typography and for the accuracy and elegance of its editions. In 1720, as head of a society of Bolognese printers, Della Volpe acquired the printing establishment of the widow of Giulio Borsaghi. His first musical publication was an enlarged edition (1720) of Angelo Bertalotti’s Regole utilissime per … il canto fermo. He issued a further enlarged edition in 1744 (reprinted 1756, 1764 and 1778). He ordered musical type characters from the Netherlands and in 1734 began his music printing activities in earnest, starting with Giovanni Battista Martini’s op.1, Litaniae atque antiphonae finales B. Virginis Mariae. Della Volpe was also active as a bookseller, handling the musical publications of the Bolognese printers P.M. Monti and G.A. Silvani. In ...

Article

David Sanjek

[James Rae ]

(b Buffalo Valley, TN, Feb 28, 1911; d Nashville, TN, Aug 27, 1963). American country music agent, publisher, and Grand Ole Opry manager. One of the most influential and powerful figures in the country music business, Jim Denny followed the path of the classic American success story. He left his home in Buffalo Valley, Tennessee, at age 16 with purportedly no more than 40 cents in his pocket. He moved to Nashville and joined the mailroom staff at WSM radio (home of the Grand Ole Opry). He completed his college degree by mail and worked his way up the corporate ladder, becoming the manager of concessions at the Opry during World War II. In 1951 Denny was promoted to manager of the Opry, an appointment that granted him to programming privileges and thus put him in the position to make or break performers’ careers. Additionally, he headed the ...

Article

Alexander Weinmann and John Warrack

(b Mattsee, nr Salzburg, Sept 5, 1781; d Vienna, April 7, 1858). Austrian publisher and composer. He studied music in Michaelbeuren and Salzburg and in 1800 entered Raitenhaslach Abbey. After the dissolution of the Bavarian monasteries (1803) he went to Vienna, where he taught the piano and guitar, and soon became known for his arrangements and compositions (six masses by him had been published in Augsburg in 1799); many of his works were published in Vienna. His job as a proofreader for S.A. Steiner & Co. (as detailed in Beethoven’s letters) gave him an increasing interest in music publishing, and in the Wiener Zeitung (15 September 1817) he advertised a subscription for some of his sacred compositions, which were to appear from his newly established publishing house in the Schultergasse. On 29 September he moved to no.351 Am Hof. The first notice of publications (...

Article

W. Thomas Marrocco, Mark Jacobs and Donald W. Krummel

American firm of music publishers. They were pre-eminent in the USA in the second half of the 19th century. Oliver Ditson (b Boston, 20 Oct 1811; d Boston, 21 Dec 1888) served as an apprentice, beginning in 1826, to Samuel H. Parker, then to other publishers. In 1835 he began his own music publishing firm in the same building as Parker, and in 1836 the two became partners in the firm of Parker & Ditson. When the partnership was dissolved in 1842, Ditson acquired the remaining interest in the publishing company. Three years later John C. Haynes joined Ditson, becoming a partner when Oliver Ditson & Co. was formed in 1857. Ditson’s pre-eminence among the nation’s music publishers is reflected in his service as the first president (1856) of the Board of Music Trade, established in June 1855 to address problems of piracy and underpricing. Other publishers claimed more memorable editions in the 1850s and 60s, notably those of Stephen Foster and of the music of the Civil War. But Ditson, who had quietly assembled a solid catalogue of relatively nondescript sentimental parlour songs during these years, was well off at the war’s end....

Article

Suzanne G. Cusick

revised by Maureen Buja

(b Ghedi, nr Brescia, c1500; d Rome, 1565). Italian printer. His entire professional career was spent in Rome. From March 1526 to April 1527 he collaborated with the printer Giovanni Giacomo Pasoti of Parma on six of the eight music books Pasoti printed for the Roman publisher Jacomo Giunta. By 1531 Dorico was established as an independent printer and bookseller, producing at least five collections of music and one musical treatise during the next six years. In all the music books with which his name is associated from the 1520s and 1530s, Dorico used the double-impression method of printing; after Pasoti’s disappearance from Rome during the sack of 1527, Dorico retained possession of his types and decorative materials, using them in his own editions in the 1530s. After a musical hiatus of seven years, he adopted the single-impression method, devised by Attaingnant, for his edition of Morales’s masses in ...

Article

Anne Schnoebelen

(fl Bologna, 2nd half of the 17th century). Italian printer. He was active in Rome before transferring his business to Bologna in 1638. He apparently published no music himself, but the ‘Eredi di Evangelista Dozza’, namely Carlo Manolesi and Pietro Dozza, probably Dozza’s son, issued music during 1663...

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Stanley Boorman

(b Rouen; d Geneva, 1556–7). French music printer. A Simon Du Bosc, possibly identifiable with the music printer, though called a Parisian, first printed at Alençon between 1529 and 1534. He seems to have been in Paris before that time and was also there in 1534; at the end of that year he was listed as a heretic. Guillaume Simon Du Bosc appears in Geneva, where a heretic would reasonably have gone, in 1553; in that year or the next he was joined by Guillaume Guéroult, a relative, in partnership. Between that year and 1556, when Guéroult appears to have left for Lyons, they printed at least 12 volumes of music, some of which are lost; they include collections of motets by Clemens non Papa, Crecquillon, Gombert, Goudimel, Sermisy and others, and a book of psalm settings. It has been suggested that Du Bosc was the printer, while Guéroult acted as the financial partner and, probably, music editor. Du Bosc also printed on his own account, including three volumes of motets (one by Clemens non Papa)....

Article

Samuel F. Pogue

revised by Frank Dobbins

(b Sens, c1515; d Paris, 1576). French music printer. He was active in Paris between 1549 and 1568 and occupied an important position between Attaingnant, whose last music book under his own name was issued in 1550, and Le Roy & Ballard, who began a long career as royal printers of music in 1551.

Described as a bookseller in a document dated November 1540, Du Chemin issued his first printed book in 1541. In 1543 he moved his shop to the rue St-Jacques-de-Latran under the sign of the silver Griffin, the address from which he issued music as well as many books on medicine, grammar, arithmetic, law and Latin literature to the end of his career. In November 1545 he married Catherine Delahaye, ward of the printer Poncet le Preux, who was Attaingnant’s brother-in-law – a circumstance that undoubtedly helped turn his attention towards music printing. Although the inclusion of some music types in a 17th century inventory compiled by Guillaume Le Bé suggests that Du Chemin was himself an engraver, he purchased punches and matrices for music from ...

Article

Miriam Miller

revised by Jeremy L. Smith

(bc1540; d London, 1608). English music printer and publisher. There is no evidence to support the theory that one of the variant spellings of his name, ‘Este’, might indicate Italian origin. From evidence of his deposition in a civil case, it seems that East was born in Swavesey, Cambridgeshire, and was the uncle of the composer Michael East, not his father, as has often been conjectured. East's ancestors had already settled in England many years before his birth; his array of type ornaments included two pieces in the design of the East family heraldic seal, which has been traced to the regin of Henry VII. He was made free of the Stationers’ Company in London in 1565, and worked at first mainly as a trade-printer for other London-based publishers. He was one of those who signed ‘The complaynt of the poor printers’, a list of grievances sent to Lord Burghley in about ...

Article

Alexander Weinmann

Austrian firm of music publishers. It was founded by Joseph Eder (b Vienna, 26 July 1760; d Vienna, 17 Feb 1835), who originally sold fancy goods and cheap engravings by the Prague publisher Balzer in the provinces. He later became a partner in the Vienna branch of Balzer's firm, and in 1789 its proprietor. On 16 September 1789 he opened a fine art and copper engraving shop in the Trattnerhof, Vienna, which moved from there to the house ‘Zum Goldenen Krone’ in the Graben on 20 June 1792. With his first music prospectus on 19 April 1794, Eder began a series of isolated attempts at publishing, which gained considerable impetus when Ignaz Sauer became a partner (of Joseph Eder & Comp.) on 2 November 1796; the partnership ended in January 1798, when Sauer founded his own music publishing firm, Zu den Sieben Schwestern. Eder's brisk publishing activity is demonstrated by the fact that 511 works had appeared by ...

Article

Marie Louise Göllner

(b Hadamar, July 26, 1502; d Frankfurt, Feb 9, 1555). German printer. He enrolled as a student at the University of Mainz in 1516, probably remaining there until 1519. In 1528 he established a printing business in Strasbourg. In 1530 he moved to Frankfurt, where he was accepted as a citizen in the same year and began printing in 1530 or 1531. During the years 1538–43 he also maintained a subsidiary firm in Marburg where he was official university printer. He soon left this branch in the hands of his assistant, Andreas Kolbe, and returned to Frankfurt. After his death the firm was continued by his widow Margarethe until 1572, when she divided it among his heirs, who continued publishing under the name Egenolff until 1605.

Egenolff was the first printer of any importance in the city of Frankfurt, which was to become one of the main centres of the trade in the later 16th century. His production of about 500 works was large for his time; it included works in a great variety of fields such as medicine, science, history and the classics. His music publications, though a very small part of the total output, reflect his close ties to the humanistic movement and to the leaders of the Reformation. The earlier edition of Horatian odes (...

Article

Marie Louise Göllner

(b Nuremberg, 1524; d Frankfurt an der Oder, Aug 21, 1583). German printer and book dealer. He probably learnt the printing trade in his native city, and he entered the University of Frankfurt an der Oder in 1547. Two years later he took over Nicolaus Wolrab's printing press and within a few years it became one of the main publishing houses in eastern Germany. He soon became official printer for the university and was made a member of the city council in 1570. On 31 October 1577 he requested and was granted the protection of Maximilian II's imperial patent. A subsidiary firm, founded by Eichorn in Stettin in 1568–9, was given to his son-in-law, Andreas Kellner (d 1591) in 1572. The main business was taken over in 1581 by Eichorn's son Andreas (b Frankfurt an der Oder, 17 Sept 1553; d Frankfurt, 21 Nov 1615...

Article

M.K. Duggan

[Emericus, Johannes ]

(fl 1487–1506). German printer, active in Italy. He came from Udenheim in the diocese of Speyer. In 1487 he printed two books with Johann Hamman, in 1492 he began printing on his own, and in 1494 for Luc’Antonio Giunta and other Venetian publishers. His speciality was liturgical books with music. Of the 71 books he issued, 67 were liturgical and at least 24 contain printed music or space for manuscript music (20 missals, one gradual, one antiphonal, two processionals and two Libri catechumeni). To print music he used woodcut blocks (a 1493 Missale romanum), metal roman plainchant types in four sizes and added mensural music type for the mensural Credos of the 1499 Graduale. The Graduale has been called the largest book printed in the 15th century; it uses a very large chant type with a variety of designs for different-sized neumes as well as ornamentation or liquescence. The mensural type, a black notation, preceded that of Petrucci by two years....

Article

Zdeněk Culka

(b ?1778; d Prague, June 23, 1841). Czech bookseller and publisher. He had a bookshop first in Leipzig and then from 1809 (or 1810) until 1835 (or 1836) in Prague, where until 1832 he also ran a publishing house. He published mostly contemporary dance music, vocal and piano pieces by Prague composers, notably Václav Jan Tomášek. In 1817 he produced Jakub Jan Ryba's book Počáteční a všeobecní základové ku všemu umění hudebnímu (‘First and universal principles for all musical art’), which was of fundamental importance in the development of Czech literature on music. He also attempted to publish the first Austrian bibliography, but failed for lack of support.

K. Nosovský: Knihopisná nauka a vývoj knihkupectví československého [The science of book printing and the development of Czechoslovak bookselling] (Prague, 1927), 212 K. Chyba: Slovník knihtiskařů v Československu od nejstarších dob do roku 1860 [Dictionary of printers in Czechoslovakia from early times to 1860] (Prague, 1966–), 85...

Article

Robert S. Nichols

revised by Jeremy Drake

(b Troppau [now Opava], May 27, 1872; d Paris, Sept 3, 1927). French music publisher of Czech birth. After an association with Schott in Mainz, he founded a music-publishing house in 1907 in Paris and provided a large outlet for foreign works in France. Formerly the representative of several foreign publishers, Eschig is currently the agent solely for the hire catalogue of Carisch, Milan. Eschig's production was many-faceted and included French language versions of much of the Viennese operetta repertory, but he was particularly devoted to 20th-century music. The catalogue contains works of Falla, Koechlin, Martinů, Milhaud, Poulenc, Ravel, Satie, Szymanowski, Tansman, Tournemire and Villa-Lobos. Other composers represented include Auric, Charpentier, Delannoy, Halffter, Harsányi, Honegger, Inghelbrecht, Mihalovici, Nin and a considerable number of Latin-American composers, including Brouwer and Ricardo Castillo. More recent arrivals include Béchara El-Khoury, Joshua Fineberg, Juan Guinjoán, Sukhi Kang, Antoine Tisné, Ezequiel Viñao and Adrian Williams. Eschig's notable publications for guitar include Emilio Pujol's ...

Article

Hans-Martin Plesske

revised by Clifford Caesar

(Emil Alexander)

(b Berlin, Nov 30, 1847; d Leipzig, Sept 11, 1926). German music publisher. He studied at the Leipzig Conservatory and founded his publishing firm in Leipzig in 1874. He published chiefly educational and choral material (Deutsche Eiche). In 1891 he obtained the miniature score series published by Albert Payne in Leipzig, and in 1894 took over the London firm Donajowski’s edition of scores, combining the two series. More than 1000 works have appeared in the Eulenburgs kleine Partitur-Ausgabe (Eulenburg Miniature Scores). The firm also publishes symphonic orchestral music, including works by Atterberg, Graener, S.W. Müller and Trapp. In 1911 Kurt Eulenburg (b Leipzig, 22 Feb 1879; d Wembley, 10 April 1982), son of the founder, became partner and in 1926 sole proprietor; he moved the firm to London in 1939. After World War II branches were established in Zürich (1947) and Stuttgart (...

Article

Marie Louise Göllner

[Schmidt, Nickel]

(b c1490; d Leipzig, 1554). German printer . Records show that he became a citizen of Leipzig on 5 October 1510. His printing and publishing business, begun in 1521, included a book bindery and a retail bookshop. Since no publications bearing his name are dated later than 1545, he probably devoted the last years of his life to the sale rather than to the printing of books. After his death the firm was taken over by his son, Lorenz, but apparently with little success.

One of the first Protestants in Leipzig, Faber maintained close business ties with Georg Rhau in Wittenberg. His book production was largely confined to school texts and grammars and theological writings, beginning with the works by Reformation authors and later turning to those of the Catholic Church. In music he is known for a single publication, Melodiae Prudentianae et in Virgilium magna ex parte nuper natae...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(b Heidelberg, 1527 or 1528; d Frankfurt, April 22, 1590). German publisher. Much of Frankfurt’s status as the leading city for printing in 16th-century Germany was due to his activities. His father Ägidius was a painter and engraver, and a cousin, Johann, was a printer and bookseller active in Frankfurt from 1559. Feyerabend appears to have started printing in Augsburg, before visiting Venice. He was in Frankfurt before 25 May 1559, when he was made a citizen. He set up there as a wood-cutter, doing commissions for the printers David Zöpfel and Johann Rasch, and a portrait of the Doge of Venice in Andress Keller’s Chronik. Almost immediately he began publishing, employing most of the printers of a lively centre in the following 30 years. In 1563 he entered into an agreement with Georg Rab and the widow of the printer Weigand Han, as a result of which he printed over 60 titles in the next seven years. He employed distinguished craftsmen and artists: his engravers included Jobst Amman and Virgil Solis. He exhibited regularly at the annual Frankfurt fairs, and the extant lists show not only the range of his stock, but also the numbers of copies of individual titles that were taken to exhibition. In ...