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Article

Miriam Miller

(d 1679). English music printer. He succeeded Thomas Harper in 1656 and took over the printing of all of John Playford the elder’s musical publications until his death in 1679. Godbid was a reliable and conscientious printer, if not an inspired one. In spite of the fact that the printing materials he inherited from Thomas Harper dated back over a generation, and were out of date by the middle of the 17th century, for 23 years Godbid’s press produced the music volumes on which the elder Playford’s remarkable business was built. He also printed Tomkins’s ...

Article

Marie Cornaz

(b Saint Samson, 1740; d Brussels, Dec 24, 1806). French bookseller, publisher and agent, active in Brussels. First a seller of engravings, he became one of the principal music sellers in Brussels from 1774. He published the works of Honauer, Pauwels and G. Ferrari, and made a request to the Milan engraver C.G. Barbieri to publish the works of C.-L.-J. André. Godefroy was also the Brussels agent for numerous Parisian publishers, his name appearing on the title-page of publications by La Chevardière (for the works of Anfossi and Paisiello), Sieber (Cramer, Haydn, Kammel), Durieu (Dalayrac), Heina (Eichner, J.A. Lorenziti, Vanhal), Mmes Le Menu and Boyer (J.H. Schröter), J.-P. Deroullède (B. Lorenziti, Pieltain, Anton Stamitz), Mondhare (Staes), Bailleux (Chevalier de Saint-Georges) and Camand (Jean Cremont). Being the Brussels agent for Heina, Godefroy was the first to distribute the music of Mozart in Brussels with a Parisian edition of the op.4 piano sonatas....

Article

Samuel F. Pogue

revised by Frank Dobbins

(fl Lyons, 1550–84). French music printer, bookseller, composer and instrumentalist. In 1551 he prepared the third in a series of four books of music for guitar printed in Paris by Robert Granjon and Michel Fezandat (RISM 1551²²). In the dedication Gorlier wrote apologetically of the four-course guitar and his reasons for composing for an inferior instrument, saying that he wanted to show that it was as capable as larger instruments of reproducing music in two or three parts. Besides being an ‘excellent joueur’ on the guitar, as cited on the title-page, he evidently played the spinet; in a pamphlet (now lost) concerning Loys Bourgeois’ Droict chemin de musique (1550) Bourgeois called him ‘trougnon d’épinette’ (‘garbage of the spinet’) and complained that he had not been educated in classical languages and mathematics like the singer-composers in Lyons, Layolle Roussel and Jambe de Fer.

Gorlier was granted a privilege for printing music on ...

Article

Roland Würtz

(bap. Mannheim, Feb 7, 1740; d Worms, Feb 15, 1810). German music publisher. By his own account he founded a firm of music engravers in Mannheim in 1768, but documentary evidence of his publications exists only from 1773. He soon incorporated a music shop into his publishing enterprise, buying new publications for it on his travels, especially in Paris; the publisher’s catalogue he printed for the Frankfurt book fair includes works by Gossec, Rigel, Hüllmandel and Boccherini. On 23 August 1776 Elector Carl Theodor granted his application for an exclusive patent for 20 years within the Palatinate, which was extended to include Bavaria in 1782. In view of the rapid rise of Götz’s publishing business, Mozart’s comment that he could not get his piano and violin sonatas printed in Mannheim (28 February 1778) is surprising. Eschstruth praised Götz’s prospectus (Musicalische Bibliothek, i, 1784), and he was soon able to open branches in Munich and Düsseldorf. His business began to suffer during the war which began in ...

Article

Miriam Miller

(d 1543). English music printer and publisher. He printed Myles Coverdale’s Goostly Psalmes and Spirituall Songes. Long conjectured on textual grounds to date from just before Gough’s death, this work has been located in John Rastell’s will, suggesting a publication date of before 20 April 1536. It employs the same type originally used by Rastell, with whom Gough had business connections; no other piece of music printing by Gough has survived. He worked at the ‘Sign of the Mermaid’, Lombard Street, London....

Article

Paul-André Gaillard

revised by Laurent Guillo

(b Senlis, Oct 20, 1543; d Geneva, Feb 3, 1628). French music publisher. He studied law in Paris but then devoted himself to the Reformation movement. He left Paris for Geneva in 1566 and was ordained there on 20 October. He carried out his ministry first at Chancy and Cartigny, and then, after serving in several French parishes, was appointed in 1571 to St Gervais, Geneva. He succeeded Bèze as head of the Church in Geneva on the latter’s death in 1605. Between about 1576 and 1597 he published works by Lassus, Arcadelt, Crecquillon, Gérard de Turnhout, Jean de Castro, Noé Faignient, Goudimel, Séverin Cornet, Guillaume Boni, Antoine de Bertrand and others, with modified, and in some cases new, texts. The only composer whose works he published in their original form was Jean Servin. All the known Genevan music printers of this time printed his works (Jean Le Royer, Pierre de Saint-André, Jean II de Tournes) and some of them were commissioned by foreign booksellers (Charles Pesnot in Lyons or Jérôme Commelin in Heidelberg). The prefaces he wrote to his publications (in ...

Article

Miriam Miller

(fl 1540–50). English music printer. He is notable for having printed some of the earliest books of the English church service. In 1544 he printed ‘an exhortacium unto prayer, thought mete by the Kynges maiestie … also a Letanie with suffrage to be saide or songe in the tyme of the said processions’. He also printed John Merbecke’s ...

Article

Samuel F. Pogue

revised by Frank Dobbins

(b Paris, c1513; d Rome, after Nov 16, 1589). French type founder and printer. His chief skill was as a type designer and founder, although he was also active as a printer, both in his own name and with various associates. He is best known for the design and execution of a typeface which imitated the cursive French gothic manuscript hand, known as caractères de civilité; he also designed roman and italic types, characters for several Middle Eastern alphabets and some important music founts. He printed several books of music during two periods of his life: at Paris in 1551 and at Lyons between 1558 and 1559.

A leaf of type samples dated 1583 lists the printer as ‘Rob. Granjon Parisiensis’ with the indication underneath ‘aetatis suae LXX’, thus providing the place and date of Granjon’s birth. He seems to have become active as a type designer in Paris about ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(fl Rome, 1624–50). Italian printer and publisher. He was active in Rome from 1624 to 1650. He seems to have had some contact with Vincenzo Bianchi, bookseller and later (from 1628) publisher of music, and who himself printed a few books in the years around 1640. Grignani published a few treatises (mostly by Romano Micheli) before 1638 when he began to print music. In a dozen years he printed nearly 50 books of music or treatises, among them a number of Micheli’s canons. He seems to have published only two books of secular music and two reprints of instrumental works. The rest was characteristically Roman: a collection of sacred works by local composers (Cifra, Francesco Foggia, Massenzio and both Mazzocchis), and a collection edited by Florido de Silvestris. He also reprinted works by Palestrina and Anerio in 1646 and 1649, and published several volumes of music by Diruta and treatises by Kircher and Sabbatini....

Article

Stefano Ajani

revised by Bianca Maria Antolini

(b Florence, Oct 12, 1817; d Florence, Jan 17, 1883). Italian music publisher and double bass player. He played the double bass at the Teatro della Pergola, Florence (1849–53), and in 1844 opened his publishing firm under the name G.G. Guidi, Stabilimento Calcografico Musicale. He both founded the Società del Quartetto di Firenze and published the music performed at its concerts and competitions in the society’s journal, Boccherini (1862–82); he was also the publisher of the winning compositions at the Duea di S Clemente competition. His catalogue included a number of chamber works and overtures by Beethoven, Mozart and Mendelssohn, and compositions by contemporary musicians, including Bottesini and Francesco Anichini. He published many full scores of operas, including Rossini’s Guillaume Tell and Il barbiere di Siviglia, Meyerbeer’s Les Huguenots and Robert le diable, and Peri’s Euridice (1863), transcribed directly from the 17th-century edition. The catalogue also contained operas by Morlacchi and Mancinelli, polyphonic music, including madrigals by Tromboncino and Arcadelt (...

Article

Theodor Wohnhaas

(b 1711; d Nuremberg, Oct 22, 1767). German music publisher. He founded a music publishing house in Nuremberg about 1742 with the copper-engraver Johann Wilhelm Winter (1717–60), and managed the business on his own from 1745; he was the leading Nuremberg music publisher of the mid-18th century. The firm specialized in the piano and chamber music of German (central and southern) and Italian composers, including C.P.E. Bach and Domenico Scarlatti. During his 25 years as a publisher Haffner issued about 150 works, all first editions; almost all were engraved by the outstanding Nuremberg engraver Johann Wilhelm Stör (1705–65). The Nuremberg art dealer Adam Wolfgang Winterschmidt took charge of the publishing house in 1770, and was succeeded by his son in 1786.

NDB (L. Hoffmann-Erbrecht) L. Hoffmann-Erbrecht: ‘Der Nürnberger Musikverleger Johann Ulrich Haffner’, AcM, 26 (1954), 114–26; xxvii (1955), 141–2, xxxiv (1962), 194...

Article

Teresa Chylińska

(b Rothenburg, c?1467; d Kraków, 7 or Oct 8, 1525). Polish publisher and bookseller of German birth. Granted the first royal privilege issued in Poland, he began its earliest publishing business in Kraków in 1494. In 1503 he issued the Missale Wratislaviense in which the music in Gothic notation was printed from movable type in two colours. Possibly on his initiative, the German printer Kasper Hochfeder went to Kraków in 1503 and from 1505 to 1509 served as the firm’s technical manager. Haller’s output of about 250 publications included scientific books, university textbooks, state documents and liturgical books. In the field of music he is principally known for the printing of Bogurodzica (the knights’ hymn), and two treatises by Sebastian z Felsztyna, Modus regulariter accentuandi (1518) and Opusculum musicae compilatum (1517) in addition to the missal.

Przywecka-SameckaDM ‘Haller Jan’, Słownik pracowników książki polskiej...

Article

M.K. Duggan

[Hertzog ]

(b Landau; d ?Speyer, after October 1509). German printer. Between 1482 and 1509 he printed 85 books, all in Venice except the last, printed in his native Speyer diocese. Most were liturgical books for dioceses from England to Hungary; 16 contain printed notes and staves, or staves. Large, medium and small roman plainchant types appear in missals of corresponding formats – five folio, one quarto and five octavo. In addition he introduced a medium gothic plainchant type for an agenda for Passau. Together with his former partner Johann Emerich of Speyer, Hamman issued a third of the music books printed in 15th-century Italy....

Article

M.K. Duggan

[Gallus, Udalricus]

(b Ingolstadt; d Rome, c1478). German printer, active in Italy. He claimed in colophons to have been a citizen of Vienna (see Borsa). Colophons also tell us that Han was a priest (venerabile vir), attended a university (magister) and was a man of some social standing (dominus). He is probably the Ulrich Han from Ingolstadt who matriculated at the University of Leipzig in the winter of 1443–4 and the Udalricus of Ingolstadt registered for the winter term of 1438. He has been proposed (see Donati; reviewed by Wehmer) as the possible printer of the first book in Italy, an undated Passio Christi in Italian; the engraved illustrations are indicative of the work of Johann Numeister.

Between 1467 and 1478 Han published about 80 books in Rome. Early production focussed on classical works, many edited by Giovanni Andrea Campano. Between 1471 and ...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(d after 1610). German printer, son of Georg Hantzsch. He took over his father’s press in 1583 and printed in Mühlhausen until 1599, when he was invited to become city printer at Hildesheim. He started there in 1600 with an ambitious list, but production fell away and he was back in Mühlhausen in 1609. His last recorded edition is dated 1611; all the music that survives from his press appeared before 1600, with the exception of a treatise by Martin Scheffer, printed in 1603. The rest comprises, almost exclusively, volumes dedicated to works by Burck, several of which are editions of music first printed by his father.

J.H. Gebauer: ‘Das Buchgewerbe in der Stadt Hildesheim’, Niedersächsisches Jb, 18 (1941), 223–58 W. Hartmann: ‘Hildesheimer Drucke der Zeit vor 1650’, Alt-Hildesheim, 31 (1960), 1–36 [catalogue with illustrations] J. Benzing: Die Buchdrucker des 16. und 17. Jahrhunderts im deutschen Sprachgebiet (Wiesbaden, 1963, 2/1982)...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(b ?c1520; d Mühlhausen, 1583). German printer, father of Andreas Hantzsch. When he was accorded citizenship of Leipzig in 1545 he was already called a printer. In 1550 he married the widow of Michael Blum, a local printer, and acquired his press. At Leipzig he printed some theoretical writings, editions of Zanger, and of Heinrich Faber, Figulus and Listenius that had appeared elsewhere. In 1560 he went to Weissenfels and by 1567 to Mühlhausen, where he printed several volumes of music, including most of the work of Burck, and some music by Eccard and others. He also reprinted some of Faber’s works and other titles. When he died his press passed to his son.

J. Rodenberg: ‘Alte Leipziger Druckereien’, Graphische Nachrichten, 13 (1934), 420 E. Sägenschnitte: ‘Buchdruck und Buchhandels in Weissenfels’, 25 Jahre Städtisches Museum Weissenfels (Weissenfels, 1935), 79 H. Koch: ‘Regesten zur Leipziger Buchdruckergeschichte im 16. Jhdt’, ...

Article

Miriam Miller

(d ?London, March 1656). English music printer. He worked in London from 1614 and acquired part of the business of Thomas Snodham. From 1650 until his death he printed all the elder John Playford’s music publications, including the first edition of The English Dancing Master (dated 1651 but issued in ...

Article

David Johnson

revised by Kenneth Elliott

(d Edinburgh, Dec 1621). Scottish bookseller and printer. By 1589 he was an importer of foreign books; in 1601 his name appeared in a psalm book printed in Dordrecht, the Netherlands, to be sold in Scotland. In 1610 he became a publisher in Edinburgh, issuing a famous folio Bible in that year and many psalters (with the melodies), as well as books of Scottish court poetry, mathematics and theology. One of the most interesting of the psalters is that of 1615 in which, for the first time, the 12 Common Tunes were printed as a group and given distinctive titles.

After Hart’s death, his widow (d Edinburgh, 3 May 1642) published more psalm books with the imprint ‘the Heires of Andro Hart’. Among these is the most important 17th-century Scottish church music publication, the 1635 psalter, which contains 143 psalm settings, nearly all by Scottish composers: 104 of Proper Tunes, 31 of Common Tunes and 8 imitative settings ‘in reports’....

Article

Richard Macnutt

[Romain-Jean-François]

(b Paris, May 14, 1843; d Paris, April 22, 1900). French music publisher. He started business in 1866, at 19 boulevard de la Madeleine, Paris. About 1878 he moved to 60 rue Neuve-St-Augustin; by the end of 1881 the street name had been officially changed to rue Daunou and the number to 20. In May 1891, after he went bankrupt, his business was acquired by Heugel, but he continued publishing in association with, and under the imprint of, Eugène Fromont.

Hartmann was in a sense the ideal publisher: a philanthropist of exceptional discernment and energy. Among his first publications was Massenet's youthful song, Poème d'avril (1866). This led not only personally, commercially and artistically to one of the most rewarding of publisher-composer relationships, but to greatly needed new standards of presentation of music publications (which may be seen in the vocal scores of Esclarmonde and Le mage...

Article

Stanley Boorman

(d Coburg, 1618). German printer. He was in charge of the ducal printing house in Coburg from 1596 until his death, and from 1599 he was also a city official. He printed almost nothing but the works of Benedikt Faber, Melchior Franck and Heinrich Hartmann. Particularly interesting among his extant publications is a series of volumes, including anthologies (RISM ...