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Donald W. Krummel

(d ?La Rochelle, ?1589). French typographer and printer. In 1572 he began issuing music books at La Rochelle, including eight sets of Lassus partbooks (four Mellange collections, 1575–7, and four collections of Moduli, all 1576) and two books of Jean Pasquier’s Cantiques et chansons spirituelles (1578), as well as at least five editions with music of the psalm paraphrases of Marot and Bèze (1572–86). Haultin’s nephew, Jérôme, active as a typefounder in London from 1574 to 1586, managed the firm in La Rochelle between 1590 and 1600, where he issued at least nine more psalm books as well as the 1598 edition of Le Jeune’s Dodecachorde. Jérôme Haultin’s heir was his son-in-law, Corneille Hertman, who issued Le Jeune’s Les pseaumes … à 4 et 5 parties (1608) and more psalm books (the latest known one dated 1616). One more psalm book (...

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François Lesure

(b Mieschitz [now Měšic], nr Prague, Nov 20, 1729; d Paris, Feb 28, 1790). Czech musician and publisher. He was in Paris from 1764, as cor de chasse to the Prince de Conti and later trompette de chevau-léger de la garde du roy, but received his discharge in 1775. From that date he was a teacher of the trumpet and hunting horn; from 1785 until his death he was a member of the orchestra of the Comédie Française.

In January 1773 he petitioned for a six-year privilege for the publication of Stamitz’s instrumental music. For at least ten years (1775–85), he published instrumental works, especially chamber music, by fellow Czechs (Vanhal, Fiala and Stamitz) and composers of the Mannheim school (Eichner and Schwindl). Heina was a good friend to Mozart in Paris, particularly at the time of his mother’s illness and death. He also published the first editions of seven of Mozart’s works, including three piano sonatas....

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Marie Louise Göllner

(b Oberursell, c1575; d Munich, 1654). German printer. The son of a printer, he served his apprenticeship under Adam Berg in Munich. In 1597 he married his employer's daughter, Susanna, apparently against the wishes of both families, and became a citizen of Munich. He became a Catholic and was granted permission to found his own printing house by Duke Maximilian I on 3 November 1597. Thanks to the patronage of the powerful Jesuit congregation, Henricus was soon appointed court printer and had by the turn of the century usurped the lead in publishing from Adam Berg. After his death his daughter, Jakobe, continued the business for a short time, selling it to Jakob Jäcklin in 1656.

All publishing in Bavaria was subjected to strict censorship and the dukes reserved to themselves the privilege normally exercised by city governments of granting permission to prospective publishers. Thus Henricus was the only printer, besides Berg and his descendants, who was allowed to practise his trade in Munich, until well into the 17th century. His publications were devoted almost exclusively to collections of sacred Latin music by Orlande de Lassus and by composers such as Jacob Reiner, Aichinger, Klingenstein and Holzner, who worked in Munich or Augsburg in the early 17th century. He also printed most of the works by Sebastian Ertl, including those vocal works with an added organ part or continuo. His chief contribution was the publication of the important posthumous collections of Lassus's works edited by his sons Rudolph and Ferdinand. These include otherwise unpublished masses and ...

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Frank Kidson, William C. Smith and D. Ross Harvey

(b ?London, c1657; d London, bur. Nov 18, 1732). English printer and manufacturer of printing ink. He set up as a Master about 1683, and was active until about 1715. With Thomas Moore and Francis Clark he printed Vinculum societatis (1687), the first musical work with the ‘new tied note’ (i.e. quavers and semiquavers united in groups). Before then, except in engraved music, such notes were printed separately because of the difficulty of connecting, in movable types, notes of different pitch. The ‘new tied note’ was improved (as the ‘new London character’) by William Pearson, who was in business from 1699 to 1735, and who was the best known of Heptinstall’s 12 apprentices. A feature of both new types was the printing of round-headed notes instead of the former lozenge shape (for illustration see Printing and publishing of music, fig.). He issued a number of works by Purcell, including ...

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Marie Louise Göllner

(b ?Nuremberg; d Leipzig, May 20, 1527). German printer. He was officially registered as a printer in Nuremberg from 1524 to 1526. Most of the actual business, however, was apparently conducted by his wife Kunegunde (d 7 Feb 1547), while he travelled about the country distributing pamphlets, often of a heretical or politically radical nature. He was caught circulating one of these, Von der newen Wandlung eynes Christlichen Lebens, in Leipzig, then ruled by Duke Georg of Saxony, a fierce opponent of both the Reformation and peasant reform. In proceedings supervised by the duke himself he was tried and condemned to death, and after a futile attempt on his wife's part to persuade the Nuremberg city council to intercede, was publicly executed. His widow continued the printing business in her own name until 1538, although she had married another Nuremberg printer, Georg Wachter, shortly after Hergot's death....

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John W. Wagner

(b ?Dartmoor, June 4, 1770; d Boston, Aug 2, 1827). American conductor, composer and publisher of English birth, father of John Hill Hewitt. Apart from family records giving his place and date of birth, the first documented information about him is that he occupied 12 Hyde Street, Bloomsbury, London, during 1791–2. He arrived in New York on 5 September 1792. Although he advertised himself there as having had concert experience in London under ‘Haydn, Pleyel, etc.’, no evidence of this has been found. He lived in New York until 1811, his longest period of residence at one address being from 1801 to 1810 at 59 Maiden Lane. From 1792 until the end of March 1808, he was conductor of the orchestra at the Park Street Theatre, where his duties included arranging and composing music for many ballad operas and other musical productions. He also operated his own ‘musical repository’, where he gave lessons and sold musical instruments and music composed by himself and others....

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Veslemöy Heintz

(b 1815; d 1900). Swedish publisher, music dealer and printer. He began his career as an apprentice in Östergrens bok-och musikhandel in Stockholm in 1829. The history of the Östergren shop went back as far as 1802 when Pär Aron Borg started selling music from his home in Stockholm, thus founding the firm that was to become one of Sweden’s largest and most long-lived music publishing houses. By 1804 Borg, in partnership with Ulrik Emanuel Mannerhjerta, had opened a music shop. This was taken over by Gustaf Adolf Östergren (1791–1825) who not only sold music and instruments but was also a publisher. After Östergren died, the business passed through various hands until 1831, when Abraham Hirsch, at the age of 17, took over the daily management. In 1837 he bought the business and a year later he acquired a lithographic printing press and continued to expand. In ...

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Alexander Weinmann

(b Rothenburg am Neckar, May 12, 1754; d Vienna, Feb 9, 1812). Austrian music publisher and composer. He went to Vienna in 1768 to study law, but after qualifying, devoted his time to music, especially publishing and composing. As early as 1783, when Viennese music publishing was still in its infancy, he began to publish two series of symphonies in Lyons (printed by Guéra), and some quartets and duets for flute. On 24 January 1784 he announced in the Wiener Zeitung that he planned to publish all his musical works at his own expense and under his own supervision from Rudolf Gräffer’s bookshop. But in a large advertisement on 6 August 1785 he no longer mentioned Gräffer, having established a firm in his own name at his home. This advertisement gives a list of works which had already appeared as well as a new publishing programme of three different series, including orchestral and chamber music by Haydn, Mozart, Vanhal, Albrechtsberger, Pleyel, Miča, Ordonez and other foreign composers, besides Hoffmeister’s own works. Although he did not maintain his announced schedules, the business evidently flourished. Hoffmeister had connections with the Speyer publisher Bossler, whose firm acted as a kind of agent for Hoffmeister. Hence a series of announcements and some detailed reviews of works published by the Hoffmeister firm appeared in Bossler’s ...

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Hans-Martin Plesske

revised by Gunter Hempel

(b Strehla, Jan 24, 1782; d Reudnitz, nr Leipzig, Sept 30, 1864). German music publisher and bibliographer. After learning the trade he opened a retail music business in Leipzig in 1807 and soon extended this to a music publishing firm, to which he added a musical hire service and later a commission business. He was a close friend and the principal publisher of Heinrich Marschner, and for a time he promoted Schumann and Mendelssohn, published works by Berlioz, Chopin, Czerny, Clara Schumann and Friedrich Wieck, and issued songs and ballads by Loewe. Studies, didactic works and tutors for the popular instruments of the day were a prominent part of his publishing programme.

In 1817 Whistling published his Handbuch der musikalischen Literatur and Hofmeister published its successive supplements from the second (1819) and went on to produce further catalogues dealing with musical practice and music literature in German-speaking countries (from ...

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Lasairíona Duignan

revised by Barra R. Boydell

(d Dublin, 1813). Irish composer, music publisher and instrument maker. George Petrie considered him to have been the ‘most eminent British composer of military music in his time’. A Collection of Quick and Slow Marches, Troops &c. can be dated 1795–8. A square piano dated 1796 bears Holden’s name (possibly as seller rather than maker). In 1805, described as a ‘military music master and instrument maker’, he had premises in Arran Quay, Dublin. Nothing further is known about Holden’s apparent activities as an instrument maker. In 1806 he moved to Parliament Street, where he opened a music shop and began publishing, largely his own music although this continued to be issued by other Dublin publishers. On his death the business was continued by his widow until about 1818. Holden's publications included A Collection of Old Established Irish Slow and Quick Tunes (c1807); many of the airs may have been collected by his son Francis Holden. The elder Holden published two more collections of Irish music (issued periodically), collections of Welsh tunes, masonic songs and country dances, numbers of marches and quick steps, often dedicated to specific regiments and corps, and many individual songs and other instrumental pieces....

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Miriam Miller

(fl London, 1612–18). English engraver. He engraved the plates for Parthenia, or The Maydenhead of the First Musicke that ever was Printed for the Virginalls (c1612), and Angelo Notari’s Prime musiche (c1613), the earliest engraved music to be published in England. A Robert Hole has been thought to have been the engraver of ...

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Viorel Cosma

(b Braşov, 1498; d Braşov, Feb 23, 1549). Romanian printer. He was educated at the Dominican school at Braşov and at the University of Vienna (1515–25), and after working as a teacher, Protestant preacher and professor in Regensburg, Kraków, Wittenberg and Basle (1529–33) and establishing friendships with the greatest European humanists of his time (including Erasmus), he settled in Braşov. Having brought a printing press from Switzerland (1533), he printed scientific, religious and art books. Some of his textbooks were used at the Braşov Gymnasium (Schola Coronensis, founded 1544), the first humanist school of south-east Europe. In 1548 he printed a selection for teaching music to young people, Odae cum harmoniis e diversis poetis in usum ludi literarij Coronensis decerptae (ed. G. Nussbächer and A. Philippi, Bucharest, 1983). The 21 four-part polyphonic songs to texts by classical Latin and medieval writers is the oldest publication of secular music in Transylvania; the music was by Braşov composers (Lucillus, Ostermaier etc.). Honterus’s printing press became known throughout eastern Europe; in the 17th century Braşov was considered the main centre of Saxon printing (Valentin Wagner, Martin Wolffgang and Michael Hermann continued the traditions of Honterus’s press to ...

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Cynthia Adams Hoover

(b Framingham, MA, 1820; d Watertown, MA, July 6, 1895). American music publisher and music and instrument dealer. According to several accounts he was a farmhand and fiddler. He compiled a large collection of fiddle tunes popular at local dances and persuaded the Boston publishers Wright & Kidder to publish it as The Musician’s Companion. As a result of his success in selling this collection from door to door, he opened a music shop in Providence, Rhode Island, in 1842, and set up a similar business in Boston in 1843. His books of arrangements and instrument instruction were popular: the Complete Preceptor for the Accordeon (1843) sold over 100,000 copies, and his violin self-mastery volumes sold over 500,000 copies. In 1850 he sold his catalogue to the Boston publisher Oliver Ditson and agreed not to publish music for ten years. During that period he lived on his newly acquired estate in South Framingham, managed the South Reading Ice Company and compiled editions of dance music and dance instruction books....

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Alexander Weinmann

[Huberti, Antoine]

(b c1722; d Jan 13, 1791). Engraver and music publisher of Flemish descent. He worked in Paris from 1756 as a musician at the Opéra and performer on the viola d’amore, but became most prominent for his activities as an engraver and music publisher. He appears to have published works by Wagenseil in 1756 but the earliest privilege for publishing music is dated 2 April 1757. From February 1770 he made his publications available in Vienna as well, and is credited with introducing engraving to Viennese music publishing. It was probably the bookseller Hermann Josef Krüchten who persuaded him to move to Vienna, where at that time copper engraving had been little practised; Huberty and his family moved there at the beginning of 1777 and opened a music engraving and printing business in the Alstergasse, ‘Zum goldenen Hirschen’. A detailed advertisement in the Wiener Diarium (11 April 1778...