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Bulgarian music festival. The festival began as an initiative of the Ruse Philharmonic Orchestra, the conductor Sasha Popov, and the conductor and composer Iliya Temkov, for the purpose of fostering friendship and cultural cooperation between Bulgaria and the German Democratic Republic. The first concert, given on 10 March 1961, opened with the première of the September 1923 Overture by V. Kazandzhiev. The partnership between the Ruse Philharmonic Orchestra and the musical ensembles of East Berlin Radio grew steadily over the next few years. In 1964–5 the festival was dedicated to new Bulgarian symphonic works, and in 1965 it expanded to include chamber music and other instrumentation. After 1976 the festival has been held in the second half of March. At present the festival is funded by the Municipality of Ruse and other sponsors. Since 1992 the International Music Academy takes place during the festival; the teachers, in various disciplines, have included Vanya Milanova, Mincho Minchev, John Kenny, Robert Cohen, Yuri Bashmet, Patrick Gallois, Erwin Ortner, Markus Stockhausen, Anatol Vieru, Wolfgang Schultz, Sir Neville Marriner, the Arditi String Quartet, Andreas Hermann, Emmanuel Séjourné, and Paul Badura-Skoda....

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Chamber music programme founded in Marlboro, Vermont, in 1951 by Rudolf Serkin (former artistic director), Adolf and Hermann Busch, and Marcel and Louis Moyse. They conceived it as a workshop in which there would be no students or teachers, only participants. Casals, Schneider, Galimir and Horszowski are among the artists who participated regularly. Public performances are given weekly at Marlboro College during a five-week summer season. The festival has reached a wide audience through its recording series, the many taped performances it makes available to broadcasting stations, and through Musicians from Marlboro, a touring programme created in ...

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NPR  

Timothy M. Crain

NPR, formerly known as National Public Radio, is a privately and publicly funded nonprofit membership media group. Its primary focus involves the production, syndication, and distribution of news and cultural programming to US public radio stations. Individual NPR stations, however, may broadcast programming from various sources that have no formal affiliation with NPR. NPR also manages the Public Radio Satellite System, which distributes NPR programs and other programming from independent producers and networks.

In 1967 congressional passage of the Public Broadcasting Act established the Corporation for Public Broadcasting to provide federal financial support of local radio and television stations, nationally produced programming, and interrelated services. As a result, National Public Radio (NPR) was created in February 1970 to replace the National Educational Radio Network. NPR aired its first broadcast in April 1971 and soon launched national program services. Until 1977 NPR was primarily a production and distribution organization. When it merged with the Association of Public Radio Stations, however, it began to provide affiliated stations with training, promotion, and management, and to lobby Congress for funding. In ...

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Old Vic  

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ONCE  

Leta E. Miller

A series of concerts and musical/theatrical events produced by a group of avant-garde composers in Ann Arbor, Michigan, during the 1960s. The founders were Robert Ashley, gordon Mumma , Donald Scavarda, George Cacioppo, and roger Reynolds . Although all had connections to the University of Michigan (UM), ONCE was an independent venture.

Ashley, who completed a bachelor’s degree at UM in 1952, returned to Ann Arbor in 1956 and began working at the university’s Speech Research Institute and writing music for light shows devised by Art Professor Milton Cohen. Also working with Cohen at this time was Mumma, who had studied at UM from 1952 to 1954. By 1958 Ashley and Mumma had formed the Cooperative Studio for Electronic Music, using homemade or modified equipment and providing electronic sounds to accompany Cohen’s Space Theatre shows and other theatrical activities in the community. Cacioppo and Scavarda completed bachelor’s and master’s degrees at UM in ...

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Barbara B. Smith

[Pacific Festival of Arts]. The pre-eminent event for the performing arts in the Pacific. Organized to respond to the South Pacific Commission's concern about the rapid erosion of the region's indigenous arts, the first South Pacific Festival of Arts was held in Fiji in 1972. It brought together more indigenous people from Australia and the islands south of the equator than had ever before gathered in one place. In 1976 Micronesians and Hawaiians were invited to participate, and after 1980 the geographical designation ‘south’ was dropped from the name. Festivals have been held in a four-year cycle: in Rotorua, New Zealand, in 1976, Papua New Guinea in 1980, Tahiti in 1985 (rescheduled from New Caledonia in 1984), Townsville, Australia, in 1988, Rarotonga, Cook Islands, in 1992, and Apia, Western Samoa, in 1996. New Caledonia hosted the festival in the year 2000. The number of participants has grown in successive festivals: the official visiting delegations to recent festivals, most of whose members participated as musicians and dancers, have totalled approximately 2500 persons. In addition, host countries have presented a wide range of their own performing arts through the participation of large numbers of its citizens: in ...

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