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Article

Akaene  

Article

Peter Cooke

[ruganira]

Flat box-shaped rattle of the Nkore people of western Uganda. The top and bottom of the box are made from two rafts of reeds laced together with thin sticks between them at the edges to hold them apart, leaving room between for dry seeds that rattle when the box is swung rhythmically from side to side and simultaneously tapped on the top by the player’s thumbs. The sides are covered with strips of banana fibre or cloth, stitched to prevent the seeds from escaping. Vernacular names among neighbouring peoples are ...

Article

Akama  

Article

Akanono  

Article

Article

Akayau  

K.A. Gourlay

revised by Jeremy Montagu

[akacau, caccakai, koroso]

Iron ankle rattle of the Hausa people of Nigeria. The Angas equivalent is the zye-zye. A piece of sheet iron is hammered to form a trough about 12 cm long, with the ends narrowed and folded back to form closed hooks into which iron rings are fitted. A string passed through two holes punched through the back of the trough enables two or three rattles to be strung together and worn on the ankles for dancing....

Article

Akbele  

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Long drum of the Alur people of the northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. The single lizard-skin head is glued to the narrow wooden body and is beaten by hand. It is used in witchcraft ceremonies.

Article

Bengt Kyhlberg

revised by Göran Grahn

(b April 28, 1826; d July 2, 1876). Swedish organ builder. He began his training about 1844 as a pupil of Johan Samuel Strand at Västra Vingåker, and attended the Tekniska Institutet in Stockholm (1847–50). Later he worked with the Stockholm organ builders Blomquist & Lindgren and Gustaf Andersson. After gaining the organ builder’s charter in 1852, he studied on a state scholarship with Sonreck in Cologne, Gebr. Mayer in Hannover, and Merklin & Co in Brussels, and visited Cavaillé-Coll in Paris (1854–7). During his time with Merklin he voiced the organs in St Eugéne in Paris and in the Cathedral of Murcia, Spain. On his return he worked in partnership with Erik A. Setterquist at Strängnäs until 1860; he then moved to Stockholm and was co-founder with C.J. Lund of the firm Åkerman & Lund. Åkerman’s organs are in a Romantic style, which he had studied abroad; he was the first builder in Sweden to incorporate modern features such as harmonic flute stops, string stops, and pneumatic Barker lever action. An early example of his work is a small organ built for Strängnäs school (...

Article

Akidi  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

[akimbi]

Board zither of the northeastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has a single string that passes five times back and forth along a board from notches carved in both ends, with a small stick at each end serving as a nut, and small movable wooden blocks under each length of string to tune them. The name ...

Article

Akiri  

Ferdinand J. de Hen

Handheld bell of the Bandia of the Buta district, northern Democratic Republic of the Congo. It is made from the hard shell of borassus palm fruit. One end is sawn off and two short lengths of stick are hung inside as clappers. The bell is similar in shape and size to cowbells used elsewhere in the world. It is used in traditional dance music, together with ...

Article

Akofe  

Article

Ferdinand J. de Hen

[kpendimbe, kpendingbwa, kponingbo, padingbwa, pendibe]

Xylophone of the Bandia people of the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It has six to ten loose bars placed across two parallel tree (usually banana) trunks laid on the ground. Sometimes it is placed over a pit to increase the sonority. It is played only by men.

F.J. de Hen...

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Article

Akpossi  

Article

Akum  

Geneviéve Dournon

End-blown horn of Madhya Pradesh (Bastar district), India. It is a cow horn 26 to 30 cm long with the end cut out to form the embouchure. The different Bastar tribal populations of Muria and Maria have two kinds of horn: one end-blown and made of horn, the other of bronze and side-blown. They designate them either by the Gondi name ...

Article

Akya  

Article

Alamoru  

Peter Cooke

End-blown flute of the Teso and Karamoja areas of Uganda, also reported in Kenya. It has two or four fingerholes and is blown obliquely. It is a pastoral instrument, presumably made of cane or bamboo, and in Teso there are two types: a short flute (50 cm) with fingerholes near the bottom end, which is cut at an angle, and a long one (117 cm) with four fingerholes near the middle and a small gourd bell about 5 cm in diameter....

Article

Albani  

Patrizio Barbieri

[Albana, Albano, Albanus]

Italian makers of stringed keyboard instruments. At least four builders of this name were active during the 16th and 17th centuries, three of whom are known to have been members of the same Roman family. Documents show that from at least 1623 onwards Andrea Albani (b Rome, c1552; d Rome, 19 August 1639) built harpsichords at a workshop near the church of S Stefano del Cacco. He was assisted by his son Silvestro and his nephew Giovanni Battista Monti (b c1611). Although no instrument by Andrea survives, it is known from an essay by G.B. Doni (c1632–5) that he was persuaded by theorists to build some enharmonic harpsichords with split keys, each note divided either ‘into five parts, according to the principles of Don Niccola [Vicentino], or into four, following the practice which they attribute to Aristosseno’.

Orazio (b Rome, ...

Article

Charles Beare

revised by Patrizio Barbieri

(b St Nikolaus in Kaltern, March 28, 1621; d Bolzano [Bozen], Feb 7, 1712). Tyrolean violin maker, mainly active in Bolzano. In 1665–6 he worked in Rome for the luthiers Martin Artz (1665) and Andrea Portoghese (1666). Later he might have had his own workshop there, according to a violin labelled ‘Matthias Albano fece in Roma 1668’. In 1697 two Albani violins were inventoried among the four left by the Roman Carlo Mannelli (known as ‘del violino’); in the same year, again in Rome, the violinist and composer John Ravenscroft left five violins, all by ‘Mattheo Albon’.

Many violins, mostly of ordinary 18th-century German manufacture, bear false Albani labels, and his name was for a long time misused by unscrupulous dealers. Albani did not marry until 1671, and since after his death his two sons, Michael and Joseph, made instruments, it is possible that they were partly or almost entirely responsible for much of the work supposed to be by their father. In any case, the Albani influence was strong among 18th-century Tyrolean makers, especially on the Jais family of Bolzano and on Mayr and his fellow members of the Salzburg school. Albani in Bolzano, Joannes Tononi in Bologna, and Kaiser and Goffriller in Venice all emerged in northeastern Italy in the later 17th century, but it is not known who taught whom....