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John H. Baron

(b Bennington, VT, 1826; d New Orleans, Oct 28, 1888). American music publisher. He worked as a music teacher in Huntsville, Alabama (1845–52), and Jackson, Louisiana (1852–5). In 1858 he joined E.D. Patton’s music shop in Vicksburg, Mississippi, which he bought out the following year with his younger brother Henry (1831–1909). They moved to New Orleans in 1860, where they operated publishing firms and music shops jointly, separately and often with others. From 1861 to 1866 Henry also ran a shop in Augusta, Georgia. Armand was imprisoned briefly in 1862 by the Union Army for his espousal of the Southern cause; he issued more Confederate music than any other publisher in New Orleans, including one of the earliest editions of Dixie (1861), and The Bonnie Blue Flag (1861) and Maryland! My Maryland! (1862). He frequently arranged or composed music under the pseudonym A. Noir. Blackmar was in San Francisco between ...

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Donald W. Krummel

(b England, 1775; d Philadelphia, Feb 20, 1871). American music engraver and publisher. He emigrated to the USA before 1793 and in 1794 began teaching the flute and clarinet. In 1802 he acquired the piano manufactory of John I. Hawkins in Philadelphia, and soon after began to publish and to operate a circulating music library. His production included many American compositions (c1808) and political songs (c1813); an early piracy of Thomas Moore’s Irish Melodies (1808–c1825); a serial, Musical Miscellany (from 1815); and the first American edition of Messiah (c1830), along with other major vocal works by Handel. Most numerous among his output, however, were songs of the Philadelphia theatre, based on London publications. Blake also issued typeset opera librettos and engraved tunebooks. He remained active throughout the 1830s, in later years issuing minstrel music and excerpts from Italian opera. At the height of his career (...

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Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

English music publishers and instrument makers. The business, not to be confused with that of John Bland, was founded in London in 1784 by Anne Bland, who went into partnership with E. Weller in 1792. In addition to their publishing activities, which included country-dance collections and the first English edition of three Mozart piano sonatas (...

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Barry Kernfeld and Howard Rye

American record company. It was established in New York in 1939 by Alfred Lion, to record jazz; its earliest sessions produced records now acknowledged as classics, by such musicians as Sidney Bechet, Earl Hines, Albert Ammons and Meade ‘Lux’ Lewis. In the 1940s the company established an important catalogue of traditional jazz and swing, including recordings by James P. Johnson, Art Hodes and Sidney Bechet; Blue Note was among the earliest to record bop musicians, notably items by Thelonious Monk.

In the LP era the company concentrated on styles that were then contemporary, with a close involvement with soul jazz and hard bop, represented by, among others, Horace Silver, Art Blakey, Lee Morgan, Jimmy Smith and Ike Quebec. In 1963 Blue Note was purchased by Liberty; musicians recording for the company included Herbie Hancock and Wayne Shorter. Blue Note then began recording jazz-rock and more commercially orientated music; Donald Byrd’s album ...

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Charles Garrett

Record label. A budget subsidiary of RCA Victor that released race records from 1932 to 1950. It is well regarded for jazz releases by musicians such as Jelly Roll Morton, Earl Hines, and Fats Waller. The label name has been revived occasionally to repackage reissues and present new jazz recordings.

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BMG  

[Bertelsmann Music Group]

International record company with interests in music publishing, online music sales and audio equipment manufacturing. A subsidiary of the German media group Bertelsmann, BMG is one of the five companies that dominate the global record market. Based in New York, the company controls over 200 record labels including BMG Classics, RCA Victor Red Seal, Gold Seal, DHM, Melodiya and Arte Nova. BMG also owns the publishing rights to over 700,000 songs, including the catalogues of artists as diverse as The Beach Boys and B.B. King; in ...

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Alan Pope

revised by R. Allen Lott

Firm of music publishers. It was founded by Margot and Walter R. Boelke (b 20 Jan 1905; d 25 Jan 1987) in New York in 1948 and incorporated in 1951. Affiliated to ASCAP, the firm specializes in the publication of contemporary music, and under the general editorship (1952–82) of Jacques-Louis Monod, who succeeded Kurt List, built up a small but important catalogue. Among its composers are Arthur Berger, Lansky, Lerdahl, Perle, Roslawez, Schoenberg, Skrowaczewski, and Claudio Spies. In 1975 a sister company, Mobart Music Publications (an affiliate of BMI) was founded; its composers include Babbitt, Gideon, Ives, Leon Kirchner, Leibowitz, Monod, Pollock, Shifrin, Ben Weber, Webern, Zemlinsky, and Zwilich. The distributor for both companies in the United States and Canada is Jerona Music Corporation, part of the Music Associates of America.

G. Sturm: “Encounters: Walter R. Boelke,” MadAminA!: a Chronicle of Musical Catalogues, 4/1 (1983), 9–10...

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Böhm  

Alan Pope

German firm of music publishers. It was established in Augsburg in 1803 by Andreas Böhm (1765–1834), and under his direction soon achieved prominence. In 1831 the ownership passed to Andreas's son Anton Böhm (1807–84). In 1871 the firm became known as Anton Böhm & Sohn, a name it has retained, when Anton's son Moritz Anselm Böhm (1846–96) joined as a partner; three years later he became sole proprietor. In 1893 M.A. Böhm established a branch in Vienna. Moritz Anselm's eldest son, Theodor (1879–1946), took over the running of the company in 1906. The firm was completely destroyed in World War II but was restored under the directorship of Friedrich Ballinger (1906–89) and his wife Johanna, Theodor Böhm's niece, and has since regained its previous importance. Following the Ballingers’ retirement, the running of the firm passed to its manager, Gerhard Über and then to Thomas Ballinger-Amtmann, the Ballingers' nephew and adopted son. Anton Böhm & Sohn has specialized in the publication of Catholic church and organ music, for which it has established a lasting reputation. The firm has also published standard editions of Haydn, Mozart and Schubert masses, many in its series Denkmäler liturgischer Tonkunst, and has begun to publish works by 20th-century composers including Otto Jochum, Siegl, Franz Philipp, Arthur Piechler, Lemacher, Genzmer and Koetsier....

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D.J. Blaikley

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

English music publishers and instrument manufacturers. The Boosey family was of Franco-Flemish origin, and though the early family history is somewhat confused, it appears that the firm’s founder was the Thomas Boosey (i) who opened a bookshop in London in about 1792. This business continued until 1832, being known from 1819 as Boosey & Sons, or T. & T. Boosey. A separate music side of the business was started in 1816 under the control of the founder's son, Thomas (ii) (1794/5–1871). They began as importers of foreign music, but soon became the English publishers of composers such as Hummel, Mercadante and Rossini, and later of important operas by Bellini, Donizetti and Verdi. The House of Lords' decision in 1854, which deprived English publishers of many of their foreign copyrights, severely affected the firm. Among the earliest publications of T. Boosey & Co. was an English translation of Forkel's life of Bach (...

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Frances Barulich

revised by Jonas Westover

Firm of music publishers and dealers in musical instruments. Based in New York, it is a subsidiary of Boosey & Hawkes Ltd. of London. The London firm was established in 1930 as the result of a merger between Boosey & Co. and Hawkes & Co. It has grown into a major international publishing house with branches throughout the world. Besides the standard repertory, it publishes much 20th-century music and represents, among others, Stravinsky, Bartók, Kodály, Strauss, Britten, Prokofiev, Peter Maxwell Davies, and Nicholas Maw. The New York firm was first established as a branch of Boosey & Co. in 1892 and became Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., in 1930. Under Ralph Hawkes and his successors as president, it has developed its own catalog, which emphasizes the works of American composers, including Carter, Copland, Piston, Argento, Del Tredici, Kolb, Rorem, Floyd, and Lees. In 1979 a musical instrument division was created for the sale of instruments manufactured by the London firm; it was sold in ...

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Geraldine Ostrove

Firm of music publishers. It was founded in 1885 by Gustave Schirmer Jr. (b New York, NY, 18 Feb 1864; d Boston, MA, 15 July 1907) and operated from premises at 2 Beacon Street, Boston; its first publication, Arthur Whiting’s Concert Etude for piano, was issued the following year. The firm’s large catalog, which includes many works by Ethelbert Nevin and Carrie Jacobs-Bond, is predominantly educational. Among its popular instructional series are the piano methods by John M. Williams (the “Blue Books”), C. Paul Herfurth’s series A Tune a Day (for various instruments), and Junior Hymnbooks for piano by Rachael Beatty Kahl. Connections with the Schirmer family and firm remained close. Ernest Charles Schirmer, cousin of Gustave and founder of the E.C. Schirmer Music Company of Boston in 1921, was business manager and then partner, but left in 1917. On Gustave’s death ownership passed to his son, also named Gustave (...

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Alan Pope

Firm of music publishers. The company was founded in 1889 in Leipzig by an Englishman, Arthur Edwin Bosworth (1858–1923), assisted initially by Thomas Chappell and Carl Kratochwill. The aim was to protect the copyrights of the Gilbert and Sullivan operas in Austria, since at that time there was no copyright agreement between Britain and Austria. Zeller's operetta Der Vogelhändler was published in 1891 and was the most successful individual work published by the firm. Bosworth opened branches in London (1892), Paris (1896), Zürich (1908) and Brussels (1914); the latter survived until 1955 and published works by Belgian composers such as Joseph and Léon Jongen, Vreuls and Absil. His most far-reaching achievement was founding a publishing house in Vienna (1902) and acquiring the Austrian music publishers Kratochwill and Chmél. By doing so he obtained important copyrights, including Lehár's Gold und Silber...

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Rudolf Elvers

German firm of music publishers. It was founded in Berlin on 1 February 1838 when Eduard Bote and Gustav Bock (b Berlin, 2 March 1813; d Berlin, 27 April 1863) purchased C.W. Froehlich & Co. The Berlin firms of Moritz Westphal and Thomas Brandenburg were acquired in 1840 and 1845 respectively. In 1847 Eduard Bote withdrew from the business. From 1863 to 1871 Bock’s brother Emil Bock (b Berlin, 17 March 1816; d Berlin, 1 April 1871) directed the firm, followed by Gustav’s son Hugo Bock (b Berlin, 25 July 1848; d Berlin, 12 March 1932), who acquired the publishing firm of Lauterbach & Kuhn in Leipzig in 1908. He was supported by his sons Gustav Bock (b Berlin, 17 July 1882; d Wiesbaden, 6 July 1953) from 1908 and Anton Bock (b Berlin, 7 Nov 1884; d Hildesheim, 28 Jan 1945...

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Marie Cornaz

(d Brussels, May 4, 1776). Flemish bookseller and music printer. He was the principal music seller in Brussels from 1745 to 1770. As the official printer for the Théâtre de la Monnaie he printed librettos for opéras-comiques and comédies mêlées d'ariettes performed there by composers such as Duni, Monsigny and Philidor, some with a musical supplement. His publications were covered at first by a privilege of impression and sale (1757–66) which applied only to works that had not yet been staged at Brussels, and then by another which allowed Boucherie to print and sell all theatre works. Under this later privilege, he forged Parisian editions (such as Toinon et Toinette by Gossec, with the false address ‘Paris, Veuve Duchesne’) and was involved in the production of two engraved editions of the works of C.-J. van Helmont. Boucherie was the Brussels distributor for Benoit Andrez of Liège, as well as of a large number of essentially Parisian editions of instrumental music, opera librettos and music journals....

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Anik Devriès

(d after 1807). French music publisher. He was an écuyer du Roi when he married Marie-Rose-Jeanne Le Menu in February 1775. In January 1778 Boyer’s wife went into partnership with her mother, Madame Le Menu, in their music publishing business under the name of ‘A la Clé d’Or’, in the rue du Roule in Paris. The firm had been founded by Christophe Le Menu in 1758. The partnership of the ‘Dames Lemenu et Boyer’ lasted until 1783. In May of that year, Boyer, who had bought his mother-in-law’s interest in the firm on 21 January 1779, invested in the business himself. He set up shop at 83 rue Neuve des Petits Champs (between May 1783 and December 1784), then in the rue de Richelieu (or rue de la Loi) in the former café de Foy (between January 1785 and August 1796), and after 1785 he used the name ‘A la Clé d’Or’ for his own establishment. The catalogues he issued under his own name feature both new works and works previously published by Madame Le Menu. From a comparison of the Venier and Boyer catalogues, it would seem that Boyer bought the firm of Jean Baptiste Venier in ...

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J.H. Alexander

(b Lempster, NH, Feb 14, 1814; d Cleveland, OH, April 8, 1871). American music publisher. He moved to Cleveland in 1834 and with Henry J. Mould opened a music shop, Brainard and Mould, two years later. By 1845 the company was known as S. Brainard and in that year began to publish music; this business (known as S. Brainard & Sons from 1866) became one of the most important in the country. Brainard published popular music, mostly pieces for piano and songs for solo voice with piano accompaniment, but also a few sacred hymns and quartets. Also in 1845 Brainard bought Watson Hall (built 1840, known as Melodeon Hall, 1845–60, and then Brainard’s Hall until 1872), where many musical events took place. Brainard was a flautist who participated in and arranged works for musical organizations in Cleveland. The company opened branches in New York, Louisville and Chicago (where it was eventually based), and in ...

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Brandus  

Richard Macnutt

French firm of music publishers. It was established in Paris in January 1846 as Brandus et Cie when Louis Brandus (b Kremmen, 28 March 1816; d Paris, 30 Sept 1887) purchased the firm of Maurice Schlesinger. Brandus took over Schlesinger’s premises at 97 rue Richelieu, Paris; in December 1848 a move was made (or the house was renumbered) to 87 and later, in January 1851, to 103 rue Richelieu. In October 1850 Louis’s younger brother, Gemmy (b Berlin, 3 Jan 1823; d Paris, 12 Feb 1873), became a partner, and the firm of Troupenas (with which Brandus had for more than a year occasionally published) was acquired; for a time Troupenas’ premises at 40 rue Vivienne were retained. In 1854 Sélim-François Dufour (b Cherbourg, 18 March 1779; d Paris, 25 July 1872), who had previously been manager of Brandus’ outlet in St Petersburg (in existence ...