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Article

Rainer E. Lotz

(b São Paulo, 1892; d Rio de Janeiro, 1979). Brazilian bandleader, violinist, and saxophonist. He studied music in Rio de Janeiro (1917–19) and directed his own dance orchestra, gradually changing its repertory from Latin American music to jazz. He recorded prolifically on the Odeon label (1919–24) and although he did not perform as a soloist he became one of the pioneers of jazz in Brazil. While touring Europe (1924–34) he played for a time with the dancer and bandleader Grégor Kélékian. He made several recordings for Grammophon in Berlin (including Everything is hotsy totsy now, 20338, and Big Bad Bill, 20340, both 1926), some of which show to advantage the hot trumpet playing of Mickey Diamond and the blue blowing on kazoo of Sydney Sterling. (R. E. Lotz: “Eduardo Andreozzi: the Jazz Pioneer from Brazil,” Sv, no.122 (1985–6), 62 [incl. discography])...

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

[William ]

(b Tulsa, OK, Oct 28, 1952). American guitarist. He studied classical piano before taking up guitar when he was 14. While reading music at Stanford University he studied classical guitar privately and played in local rock and soul bands; during this time he often returned to Tulsa to work with a soul group, the Gap Band. Around 1979 Andress formed the duo Tuck & Patti with Patti Cathcart, whom he married in 1981, and over the next few years he began employing the fingerstyle guitar technique. He later recorded the album Reckless Precision (1990, Windham Hill 34-10124-2) as an unaccompanied soloist and released the instructional video Fingerstyle Mastery, both of which illus-trate the complex, contrapuntal nature of his style.

J. Ferguson and T. Andress: “A Private Lesson with the Amazing Tuck Andress: Radical Fingerstyle Jazz,” GP, 22/4 (1988), 80 [incl. transcrs.] D. Helland: “On the Beat: New Words for Old Notes,” ...

Article

Mark Gilbert

(Michael )

(b Baltimore, Jan 20, 1960). American electric bass guitarist. He began playing electric bass guitar in 1974 and studied at the Peabody Conservatory from 1975 to 1977 and the Berklee College of Music between 1978 and 1980; later he attended Towson State University, near Baltimore (1982). After moving to New York (1983) he played with, among others, Blood, Sweat and Tears, Special EFX (1984–6), Michael Brecker (1986–9), Bob Berg (from 1987), Bob Mintzer and Mike Stern (both from 1988), Gil Evans’s orchestra (1988), Mike Mainieri’s Steps Ahead (1989–92), Wayne Shorter (1990), and Vital Information (from 1992); he may be seen with Brecker in the video Newport Jazz ’87. In addition he worked with Dave Weckl, Bireli Lagrene, Peter Erskine, Jim Beard, Dennis Chambers, Don Grolnick, Eliane Elias, Steve Khan, Joe Zawinul, Bill Evans (iii), Branford Marsalis, Herbie Hancock, John Scofield, Jack DeJohnette, Jaco Pastorius, Joshua Redman, Larry Coryell, David Sanborn, Lew Soloff, and Joey Calderazzo. He has led a number of his own groups, including the New Standards Band (...

Article

Barry Kernfeld

[Charles E., Jr. ]

(b Holyoke, MA, Nov 17, 1928; d Florida, June 12, 1997). American double bass player. In his late teens he played jazz in Springfield, Massachusetts, with Phil Woods, Sal Salvador, and Joe Morello, and late in 1949 he began working in Boston as a member of Salvador’s trio. After attending the Manhattan School of Music he performed with Charlie Barnet (1953), Terry Gibbs (1954), and Claude Thornhill (1954–5), and he recorded with Herbie Mann, John Williams (ii), and the drummer Jim Chapin (all 1955), and with Bernard Peiffer and the trumpeter Don Stratton (both 1956). From 1961 to 1965 he toured the USA and Europe and recorded with Woody Herman. Later he worked as a freelance musician in the New York area and in Las Vegas, where in 1974 he participated in a tribute to Herman. He retired to Florida and continued performing until shortly before his death. A good example of Andrus’s playing is his solo on ...

Article

(b New York, March 28, 1930). American double bass player. He worked with Georgie Auld (1951), Jimmy Dorsey (1953), Gerry Mulligan (1954), and Claude Thornhill (1956) and performed and recorded with Buddy DeFranco (1950–51), Charlie Spivak (1952...

Article

Wayne Schneider

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(b Bentleyville, PA, Jan 20, 1922). Trumpeter and bandleader. He first played professionally in the late 1930s, then worked with bands led by Glenn Miller (1940–41) and Jimmy Dorsey (1942). During World War II he led a navy band for two years. After being discharged he formed a band in 1946 which had a hit single, Bunny Hop, in 1952. This started a national dance craze that contributed considerably to Anthony’s success. As well as continuing to record he performed with his band on television (1953–5) and in several films. He also appeared without the band in other films, including The Five Pennies (1959), a biography of Red Nichols in which he portrayed Jimmy Dorsey, and later in Story of the Big Band Era (1963), in which the jazz element of his studio big band’s performance is enhanced by the participation of such soloists as Frank Rosolino, Dave Pell, and Joe Maini, with Nick Ceroli on drums. After ...

Article

Peter Schwalm

revised by Barry Kernfeld

(b Zurich, May 24, 1937). Swiss drummer. He began learning the rudiments of drumming in a Swiss marching band at the age of nine and discovered jazz as a teenager. After playing with a local dixieland band for two years from the age of 16, and studying at the music academy in Zurich from the age of 17, he began his professional career in 1956 in Paris, where he worked with Bill Coleman (recording in Zurich, 1957), Albert Nicholas (recording in Zurich, 1958), and various French musicians. Between 1957 and 1961 he was a member of the Swiss dixieland group the Tremble Kids (with which he recorded in 1957, 1961–3, and 1971–5) and worked with other European groups. In 1962 he moved to Stuttgart, Germany, and played for five years in the big band of Süddeutscher Rundfunk under Erwin Lehn; he recorded with Wolfgang Dauner (...

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

[Arthur ]

(b New York, Sept 8, 1926). American drummer. He studied music at New York University from 1943 to 1947, although he served in the navy between 1944 and 1946. In 1948 he played in the big bands of Herbie Fields, Sonny Dunham, and Bobby Byrne. He later rejoined Fields (1951), then worked with Bud Freeman (1952), Jerry Gray (1954), in a quintet with Charlie Barnet in Las Vegas (August 1954), and others. After leaving Barnet Anton worked as a freelance studio musician in Los Angeles, where he recorded with Jimmy Giuffre (1955) and later appeared in “Stan Kenton and his Orchestra,” which was part of the television series “Jazz Scene USA” (1962); he also held non-musical jobs.

Article

Antony  

Shana Goldin-Perschbacher

[Hegarty, Antony]

(b Chichester, England, 1971). American singer-songwriter and pianist. After the Hegarty family moved to San Jose, Ccalifornia, in 1981, Antony studied experimental theater at New York University, formed a performance collective with Johanna Constantine, and collaborated with filmmaker William Basinski (Life on Mars, 1997) and rock icon Lou Reed (The Raven, Sire, 2003; Animal Serenade, RCA, 2004). Antony has become the world’s most famous transgender musician. Male-bodied and feminine-identified, Antony retains his birth name and uses masculine pronouns professionally. His band, Antony and the Johnsons (formed in 1996), is named after the murdered African American transgender activist Marsha P. Johnson.

Antony’s vocal depth, resonance, and melismatic grace evoke African American musical traditions. His tremulous vibrato and seemingly self-imposed limitations (also evident in his amateurish piano playing) express the grave earthly burdens of his lyrics. His eclectic work has been influenced by the AIDS-ravaged New York art scene (Peter Hujar), British synth-pop (Marc Almond), soul (Nina Simone, Boy George), and experimental underground music (Diamanda Galás). His band includes vocals, piano, drums, guitar, bass, cello, violin, and horns, he regularly appears with an orchestra, and he released an album of live symphonic performances with the Danish National Chamber Orchestra featuring arrangements by Nico Muhly, Rob Moose, Maxim Moston, and himself (...

Article

Gerhard Conrad

(b Pforzheim, Germany, Oct 6, 1929). German soprano, tenor, and bass saxophonist. After receiving three lessons on guitar from a member of the Reinhardt clan he played in dance bands until 1950. He then contacted Sidney Bechet in Paris and learned to play soprano saxophone. He played in Germany with the arranger and bandleader Ernst Simon and also with American soldiers. In ...

Article

Gary W. Kennedy

(b Tokyo, Sept 19, 1957). Japanese double bass player. His father was a film producer and his mother a kabuki dancer. He learned shamisen and taiko and received classical lessons on piano and guitar; later he took up double bass, and by the age of 17 he was performing on this instrument in jazz clubs around Tokyo. In 1976 he left Japan and studied film making at Ohio University and the Art Institute of Chicago (BA 1983, MA 1985). From 1978 he played electric bass guitar in local rock and “no-wave” bands, but he returned to jazz and the acoustic instrument in 1987. As an unaccompanied soloist he has performed regularly, augmenting his own playing with looped recordings of double bass and sounds derived from various objects such as soda bottles and chopsticks. In addition he has led Power Trio, with Paul Kim playing buk (a traditional Korean drum) and Mwata Bowden on saxophone (Kim was occasionally replaced by Afifi Phillard on drums), and Urban Reception, a trio with Francis Wong and the drummer Dave Pavkovic, which recorded in ...

Article

Barry Kernfeld and Gary W. Kennedy

(Noah )

(b Berkeley, CA, Aug 21, 1960). American bandleader, tenor saxophonist, composer, percussionist, and pianist. He played percussion and piano from an early age, took up drums while in elementary school, and began piano lessons when he was nine. In 1975 he formed his own improvisation group, the Berkeley Arts Company, and in 1977 he founded the Hieroglyphics Ensemble, which initially consisted of 16 reed and brass players and himself on drums; the following year he added other instruments to form a rhythm section. Having moved to New York state (c1979) he played percussion and drums in Karl Berger’s Woodstock Workshop Orchestra, and he toured and recorded with the group in Europe with Don Cherry as guest soloist (1979). Under Warren Smith (ii) he performed in the Composer’s Workshop Ensemble, and he played keyboards in Carla Bley’s Burning Sensations and worked briefly with Eddie Jefferson. In ...

Article

John Cowley and Howard Rye

(b Jamaica, c1900; d after 1954). Jamaican tenor saxophonist, clarinetist, and bandleader. He moved to Great Britain around 1924 and performed in dance bands there and in Europe until the early 1930s. He played in London with West Indian jazz musicians, including Leslie Thompson’s Emperors of Jazz (...

Article

Mark Miller

(b Cleethorpes, England, Aug 26, 1928). Canadian vibraphonist of English birth. After playing drums in English dance bands and in orchestras of the Royal Air Force he moved first to Bermuda and then to Toronto (1951). There he took up vibraphone, and worked in nightclubs and on radio and television with Calvin Jackson (recording in 1954–5) and as a leader (from 1957). He was the host of a television series, “Peter Appleyard Presents” (1977–9), seen in syndication throughout North America. In the 1970s he toured occasionally with Benny Goodman and in 1972 took part in the recording of On Stage with Benny Goodman and his Sextet (Lon. 44182–3); he later formed a tribute band with fellow Goodman alumni which toured in Canada (1986) and Britain (1987). He has also performed in the USA with Peanuts Hucko and Mel Tormé and at many jazz parties. His own recordings include ...

Article

Kazunori Sugiyama

(b Mie, Japan, March 14, 1966). Japanese double bass player. He started on electric bass guitar at the age of 16, changed to double bass two years later, and studied classical music when he was 25. In 1990 he joined the Bop Band, led by the trumpeter Hiroshi Murata. He has performed with Junko Onishi, Fumio Karashima, Motohiko Hino, and others....

Article

(b Ponce, PR, May 30, 1907; d Puerto Rico, July 26, 1970). American trombonist. He first played in New York with Wilbur De Paris (1928), June Clark (spring 1929–1930), Claude Hopkins, and Bingie Madison. In the 1930s he worked with Hopkins (it is probable that he is the trombone soloist on Chasing all the blues away, 1934, Decca 441), and he appeared with Hopkins in the short film Barbershop Blues (1933). He also performed and made recordings with Chick Webb (July 1934 and mid-1935, the former for a recording session only), Fletcher Henderson (November 1934, October 1935 – October 1936), the Mills Blue Rhythm Band (from November 1936), and the trumpeter Billy Hicks (1937, including Joe the Bomber/Fade out, Var. 601). Thereafter he played briefly with Lucky Millinder, Edgar Hayes, and Fats Waller. Following another short period with Hopkins, Arbello worked with Benny Carter (late ...

Article

Nevil Skrimshire

[Anthony John ]

(b London, July 14, 1939). English double bass player. Chilton, in Who’s Who of British Jazz, gives his year of birth as 1938, but this is evidently an error; his birth certificate confirms 1939. After a general musical education and cello studies at school he took up double bass, and in 1961 he joined a group led by Don Rendell, with which he recorded during the same year. He played and recorded with trios led by the pianists Roy Budd and Eddie Thompson (1970) and then worked with Tony Lee for many years, accompanying visiting musicians at Ronnie Scott’s, among other engagements; he also recorded in Brian Lemon’s trio under Sandy Brown’s leadership (In the Evening, 1971, Hep 20). Archer performed with Harold McNair and John Dankworth, and in the 1980s and 1990s he worked further with Lee and was a member of the group Best of British Jazz, which included Kenny Baker and Don Lusher. His playing may be heard to advantage on ...

Article

Lawrence Koch

revised by Barry Kernfeld

[James H. ]

(b Norfolk, VA, Oct 12, 1902; d Amityville, NY, Nov 16, 1967). American trombonist. He began instruction at the age of 12 and studied music at the Hampton Institute (1915–19). During the 1920s he worked with various bands in New York and occasionally left the city to tour with revues. These affiliations were mainly with lesser-known groups, but in 1927 he worked with Edgar Hayes and during that summer replaced Kid Ory in King Oliver’s Dixie Syncopators. He recorded with Oliver in November 1927 and June 1928, and perhaps took part in earlier sessions as well. In mid-1929 he rejoined Oliver, touring until September 1930 and recording up to January 1931; he figures prominently as a soloist in these recording sessions, playing consistently well in the prevailing jazz styles of the day. During this period he also recorded under the leadership of James P. Johnson (including Oliver, ...

Article

Armin Büttner and Robert L. Campbell

[Archie [Archia], Ernest Alvin, Jr. ]

(b Groveton, TX, Nov 26, 1919; d Houston, Jan 16, 1977). American tenor saxophonist. Although his given name was Ernest Alvin Archie, Jr., he changed the spelling of his surname and was known throughout his career as Tom Archia; his application for social security (on which his birthdate appears) is as Ernest Alvin Archia, Jr., but the spelling Archie appears on the Texas state death record and on his gravestone. While in high school he played in an orchestra with Arnett Cobb and the Jacquet brothers, and he continued his association with Cobb and Illinois Jacquet as a member of Milt Larkin’s band, which he joined around 1940. After performing with Larkin at the Rhumboogie Club in Chicago (1942–3) he stayed in the city; during the mid-1940s he recorded with Roy Eldridge (1943, 1946) and in Los Angeles with Jacquet and Helen Humes (...

Article

Charles Garrett