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Miriam Miller

(fl 1679–99). English music publisher and bookseller. He was one of the London music publishers to employ the printer John Heptinstall, who printed the five books of his Thesaurus musicus, a series of song anthologies (1693–6), and A Collection of New Ayres: Composed for Two Flutes … in 1695. He is generally taken to be the author of a work printed for him by Nathaniel Thompson in 1679, A Vade Mecum for the Lovers of Musick Shewing the Excellency of the Rechorder, and he also published John Banister’s The Most Pleasant Companion or Choice New Lessons for the Recorder or Flute (1681) and some of the songs from Henry Purcell’s The Indian Queen (1695; neither Hudgebut nor his publishing partner, John May, appears to have asked the composer’s permission in this venture). Hudgebut had several addresses during his career: he was first at the Golden Harp and Hoboy in Chancery Lane, then at St Paul’s Churchyard and lastly in the Strand, near Charing Cross. (...

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Teresa Chylińska

(b Halberstadt, 1581; d Danzig [now Gdańsk], 1666). German publisher and bookseller. He began printing in Danzig in 1609, and soon became the principal Reformation printer in Poland, with the support of King Władysław IV. He was a specialist in historical and linguistic books, although he also published a good deal of music. Much of this comprised monophonic songbooks, printed in a single impression using a Gothic notation typeface. In ...

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Rita Benton

(b Paris, March 9, 1753; d Paris, April 15, 1832). French violinist and music publisher. As a boy he studied with Pierre Gaviniès; at the age of 17 he made his début in a concerto in which he showed great promise, according to the Mercure de France of 1 April 1770. A performance 11 years later elicited only mild enthusiasm, and the soloist’s ‘noticeable shyness’ was commented on (Mercure de France, April 1781). His later musical activity was for the most part confined to teaching and to participation in the orchestras of various societies (including the Concert Spirituel, the Concert d’Emulation, the Société Académique des Enfants d’Appollon, the Concert Olympique and, in 1810, the imperial chapel), although in these he sometimes performed as leader, and occasionally as soloist.

The music publishing house that Imbault founded operated during its first year in connection with the already established firm of Jean-Georges Sieber (their first joint announcement, in the ...

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Ruth K. Inglefield

[Bernard, Bernhart ]

(b Porrentruy; d Strasbourg, c1594). German printer. He became a citizen of Strasbourg on 27 April 1560. He learnt the printing trade while working as an engraver in a local shop; a special dispensation from the city magistrate allowed him to pay an extra fee for professional status in both capacities. On 10 June 1567, he married Anna Fischart, sister of the prolific writer Johann Fischart. Jobin’s first publications in 1570 included poems by Fischart; he became the exclusive publisher for his brother-in-law’s works. Because of their attacks on the church and other institutions, some of these appeared under pseudonyms and with fictitious places of publication. Jobin also published scientific works. His sons, particularly Tobias, continued to publish for a few years after their father’s death. In 1605 Tobias also died and the enterprise was sold.

Editions of musical works occupy an important place in Jobin’s total output. Among the numerous books of hymns and psalms are several collections of Martin Luther’s works, and Marot and Bèze’s psalms with melodies by Goudimel. The instrumental tablatures, which he published during the 1570s and 80s, are of particular interest: these are for lute, cittern and keyboard. The two books for lute in German tablature by Jobin himself are notable for their clarity of presentation and the variety of their contents. The first book, dated ...

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Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and David Johnson

(b Ettrick Valley, c1750; d Edinburgh, Feb 26, 1811). Scottish music engraver. He was a leading Edinburgh engraver, who from 1772 to 1790 prepared plates for well over half the music issued in Scotland. The son of Charles Johnson, he was probably apprenticed with James Reed, an early Edinburgh music engraver. Johnson's first known work is Domenico Corri's Six Canzones for Two Voices (1772); then followed A Collection of Favourite Scots Tunes … by the Late Mr Chs McLean and other Eminent Masters (c1772) and Daniel Dow's Twenty Minuets (1773). These were cut in copper, but his later work is all stamped on pewter, a practice which his Scots Magazine obituary notice erroneously credits him with having invented.

Johnson worked mostly for other Scottish publishers, but he is remembered for the songbook The Scots Musical Museum, which he published himself in six volumes (...

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Frank Kidson

revised by William C. Smith and Peter Ward Jones

(fl 1740–62). English music publisher, printer, music seller and possibly violin maker. He began his business in London by 1740, and probably acquired part of those of Daniel Wright and Benjamin Cooke, some of whose publications he reissued from the original plates. Around the mid-18th century the predominance of the Walsh engraving and publishing business began to wane, and Johnson was responsible for publishing some of the best music of the day, including works by Arne, Felton, Geminiani, Nares, Domenico Scarlatti and Stanley, as well as annual volumes and large collections of country dances. Unusually, many of Johnson's editions bore dates; their technical quality was high, some being engraved by John Phillips. A number of fair-quality violins bear the Johnson label, most probably made for rather than actually by him.

Johnson appears to have died about 1762, and from that time to 1777 most of the imprints bear the name of ‘Mrs. Johnson’ or ‘R. Johnson’, presumably his widow. The old imprint ‘John Johnson’ occasionally appears in these years, and may refer to her late husband or to another relative. Johnson's sign from ...

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Miriam Miller

(fl 1687–1706). English music printer. Between 1688 and 1697 he did much of the printing for Henry Playford. His press produced six editions of The Banquet of Music, the first two books of Harmonia sacra, and one or two of the Playford family's bestsellers, like The Dancing Master...

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Robert S. Nichols

(b Saint-Savin-de-Blaye, Gironde, July 23, 1861; d Warsaw, June 11, 1934). French music publisher. He worked as a lawyer in Bordeaux and then in Paris, where he became the partner (1891) of his client Louis Bathlot, a music publisher (from 1868) and successor to Isidore Royol. In 1897 Joubert bought out Bathlot and moved to 25 rue d’Hauteville. He published many successful operettas and light works, including compositions by Rossini, Franck, Berlioz, Offenbach and Saint-Saëns.

The scope of his catalogue was greatly increased when he married Bathlot’s daughter, the widow of Philippe Maquet. Maquet had acquired most of the Brandus brothers’ catalogue (1887) which, in turn, included the catalogues of Maurice Schlesinger (acquired 1846) and Eugène-Théodore Troupenas (1850). Joubert was president of the Société des Auteurs, Compositeurs et Editeurs de Musique for most of the years between 1903 and 1932...

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Geoffrey Norris

revised by Carolyn Dunlop

(b Reval [now Tallinn], 5/July 17, 1836; d Moscow, Dec 20, 1903/Jan 2, 1904). Russian music publisher. He was educated in Reval, and in 1850 was sent to St Petersburg, where from 1855 to 1859 he was an engraver at F.T. Stellovsky’s publishing house. In 1859 he was appointed manager at the publishing house of C.F. Schildbach in Moscow, but in 1861, with the help of Nikolay Rubinstein, he established a music publishing business of his own, expanding this in 1867 to include a printing works. Between 1870 and 1903 he bought out at least 17 smaller firms, including Bernard in 1885, Meykov in 1889 and Sokolov in 1896, and the business rapidly became the largest in Russia. He opened a branch in Leipzig in 1897 and later established links with a number of other foreign cities. Jürgenson was the principal publisher of Tchaikovsky’s works, and he also produced the complete sacred works of Bortnyans′ky under Tchaikovsky’s editorship. His catalogue included works by many other Russian composers as well as the piano music of Mendelssohn, Beethoven, Chopin and Schumann, and the operas of Wagner. From ...

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Hans-Martin Plesske

revised by James Deaville

(b Leipzig, May 10, 1823; d Leipzig, June 5, 1897). German music publisher. He founded a firm in Leipzig in 1851 that brought out good contemporary music (e.g. by Liszt, Draeseke, Grabner, Busoni, Nielsen and Mahler) and a great deal of salon music. It also published careful editions of major works and various works by unfamiliar composers of the 16th and 17th centuries such as Frescobaldi, Georg Muffat and Praetorius. Kahnt also sponsored the Neue Zeitschrift für Musik after 1857, and published Peter Cornelius's Der Barbier von Bagdad in 1886. The firm passed in that year to Oskar Schwalm, in 1889 to Paul Simon and subsequently to the banker Alfred Hoffmann (1903), who enhanced its reputation by publishing musicological works (by Sandberger, Schering and Grabner) and reprinting earlier music. As C.F. Kahnt Musikalien- und Verlagsbuchhandlung the firm remained in the family's possession after Hoffmann's death (...

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Alan Frank

revised by Nigel Simeone

(August Uhlrich)

(b Vienna, May 16, 1889; d London, Sept 25, 1972). British music publisher of Austrian birth. He graduated in law at Vienna University, gaining the doctorate of letters in 1913. In addition he studied music under Guido Adler. His career in music publishing started in 1909 when he joined the young and enterprising Viennese firm Universal Edition, where he became associated with some of the seminal figures of the earlier part of the 20th century, Schoenberg, Berg, Webern, Bartók and Janáček. In April 1923 he founded the Wiener Philharmonischer Verlag, an independent company in which Universal Edition was a shareholder. It was purchased by Universal in 1925 and Kalmus returned to his old firm. Driven by political events to leave Austria, he went to London in 1936 and inaugurated the London branch of Universal Edition. He was actively concerned in running this branch up to his death, his publishing career thus spanning well over 60 years....

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W. Thomas Marrocco and Mark Jacobs

(b Vienna, Austria, Dec 15, 1893; d New York, NY, April 30, 1989). American music publisher. He founded his firm in New York in 1926. With his son-in-law, Lawrence Galison, who became the vice president and manager in 1961 and later chairman of the board, the firm began printing its own music, established an art and camera department, and later added a complete bindery; it is one of the largest self-contained publishing houses in the United States. Kalmus publishes orchestral music, as well as music for piano, organ, and solo instruments, and reprints of standard classics. With the exception of its orchestral department, Kalmus was purchased by Belwin-Mills in ...

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Stanley Boorman and Susan Jackson

(bap. Nuremberg, Feb 29, 1568/9; bur. Nuremberg, 1632). German printer. One of ten children of Johannes Kauffmann and his wife Veronica (née vom Berg), he was the grandson of Katherina Gerlach and the heir, through his mother, to his grandmother’s firm, previously known as that of Berg and Neuber.

He had worked in his grandmother’s printing house from the late 1580s (although not in the early 1580s, as some writers have indicated). After Katherina Gerlach’s death in 1592, her will, dividing the firm between her two daughters, Katherina Dietrich and Veronica Kauffmann, was contested. In 1594 the legal dispute was resolved; Veronica Kauffmann’s part of the firm, which included the printing house, formally became Paul Kauffmann’s in 1595. There is no mention of the firm in Nuremberg documents between 1617 and 1632. After Kauffmann’s death in 1632, the firm apparently passed to David Kauffmann, one of his younger brothers, who is however listed in the city’s documents only as a bookseller, not as a printer....

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Kornel Michałowski

(b Zduny, Poznań, 1770; d Warsaw, Feb 6, 1830). Polish bookseller and publisher. From about 1816 he managed a music bookshop in Warsaw which sold Polish and foreign music and also engravings of composers and virtuosos. Later he established a publishing house, at first adopting the old engraving techniques but turning gradually towards lithographic processes. His firm was, beside Antoni Brzezina's, the most important music publisher in Warsaw up to 1830. He published works by many Polish composers, including Elsner, Kurpiński, Józef Stefani and Damse, and piano miniatures, arias and opera excerpts from abroad; he also produced several educational books. After his death the firm was taken over by his nephew Ignacy Klukowski (1803–65), who directed it until 1857.

PSB (M. Prokopowicz)T. Frączyk: Warszawa młodości Chopina [Warsaw in Chopin's youth] (Kraków, 1961), 235–74M. Prokopowicz: ‘Wydawnictwo muzyczne Klukowskich 1816–1858’ [The music publishing house of Klukowski, 1816–58], ...

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Marie Louise Göllner

(b Basle, c1500; d Augsburg, 1572 or 1573). German printer. He was probably the son of the Georg Kriechstein cited as a printer in the Basle records of 1502. By 1525 Kriesstein had moved to Augsburg, where tax records from 1527 to 1573 list his name. After his death his son-in-law, Valentin Schönig, continued the business. Kriesstein's output was relatively small, and he is known mainly for his publication of Paul Hektor Mair's genealogy of Augsburg families, Augsburger Geschlechterbuch (1550), and of the collections of sacred music, mainly motets, but also a few masses and sacred lieder, edited by Sigmund Salminger and Johann Kugelmann, which contain numerous first editions and unica by German and Netherlandish composers. He also printed single works by Johannes Frosch, Ulrich Brätel and Mouton. Since Salminger edited even these items, Kriesstein himself was probably not musically trained. In addition, he printed various pamphlets, including reports of military actions against the Turks....

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Kornel Michałowski

(b Laszki Wielkie, nr Lemberg [now L′viv], Feb 15, 1836; d Kraków, Oct 11, 1922). Polish bookseller and music publisher. From 1855 he worked in various bookshops in Lemberg, Chernovtsy, Leipzig and Kraków, where in 1870 he founded his own bookshop and swiftly developed it into one of the leading Polish music firms. He specialized in publishing the music of contemporary Polish composers, including J.K. Gall, Noskowski, Szopski, Żeleński, Ignacy Friedman, Niewiadomski, Świerzyński and Wroński. His bookshop also imported the latest editions from abroad, and provided a music lending library, amounting to 16,000 items in 1885. From 1879 Krzyżanowski also managed a concert bureau, organizing performances in Kraków by many prominent virtuosos, notably Anton Rubinstein (1879), Joachim and Brahms (1880), Paderewski (1883 and later), Sarasate, Hofmann, Friedman, Eugène Ysaÿe and others. The versatility of Krzyżanowski’s firm was of great importance to musical life in Kraków, and his bookshop soon became an artistic centre. In ...

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(b Volx, Feb 1730; d Verrières-le-Buisson, April 8, 1812). French music publisher. Advertisements for musical works in various periodicals in October 1758 mark the start of his activities as a music publisher. He took over the business which Jean-Pantaléon Le Clerc had passed on to his daughter Mme Vernadé. By December 1758 La Chevardière referred to himself as the ‘successeur de M. Le Clerc’. Huberty seems to have been briefly associated with him in 1759 for both their names appear on the title-page of Philidor’s Blaise le savetier (‘Paris, de La Chevardière et Huberti, successeurs de M. Leclerc’). Thereafter La Chevardière worked alone until 1780. On 5 February he handed over the management of the shop to his daughter Elisabeth-Eléonore and his son-in-law Jean-Pierre Deroullède for three years; he finally sold the business to Pierre Leduc on 1 December 1784. He then retired to Verrières, where he became mayor of the municipality....