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Stanley Boorman

[Giangiacomo]

(fl 1597–1616). Italian printer. He appears to have begun printing at Naples in 1597 under contract to the bookseller Orazio Salviani; he later printed for other Neapolitan booksellers such as P.P. Riccio and G.B. Cimmino, and produced two collections of secular music edited by Marcello Magnetta (1613 and 1615). By 1598 he was collaborating in Naples with Antonio Pace, who also published on his own, and together they published madrigals by Dentice (1598) and Macque (1599); they also worked together at Vico Equense, but printed no music there. In 1600, publishing alone, Carlino was appointed stampatore della corte arcivescovale, a title given him on a collection of madrigals by Camillo Lambardi that he printed the same year. Much of his early production was devoted to the music of Montella. From 1607 for three years he was in partnership with Costantino Vitale. Their publications include madrigals by Meo and Dattilo Roccia (...

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Stephen Siek and R. Allen Lott

English family of publishers and musicians, active in the USA.

Stephen Siek

(b London, 1739; d Baltimore, Oct 20, 1819). Anglo-American music publisher. Descended from a long line of publisher-merchants, he was a highly skilled engraver who kept a shop in Holborn from about 1770 until his emigration to Baltimore in 1794, where he established a similar business. He formed a partnership with his son (2) Benjamin, who ran shops in both Philadelphia and New York, and they dominated the American music publishing industry until about 1800. The Carrs published European stage and instrumental works, but they also issued works by Alexander Reinagle, James Hewitt and other naturalized Americans. Much of their music was printed in serial format, such as the five-volume Musical Journal for the Piano Forte (1800–04), at the time the largest collection of secular music issued in America. On his death, Carr bequeathed the firm's holdings, which included over ...

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Carulli  

Agostina Zecca Laterza

revised by Patrizia Florio

Italian firm of publishers active 1822–33. On 22 November 1822 Giuseppe Antonio Carulli (1762–1830), custodian and music copyist since 1816 at the Milan Conservatory, applied on behalf of his son Luigi († 1826) for a licence to print music. He described himself as a native of Arsago Seprio (Varese), 60 years old and with four children. Three of them worked for their father’s publishing house: Luigi, who had already worked as a music engraver and printer; Benedetto (1797–1877), teacher of clarinet at the Conservatory from 1815; and Carlo, composer and arranger of opera arias. The engraver’s licence was granted on 4 January 1823, valid for several years, as ‘Editore ed incisore di musica dell’Imperiale Regio Conservatorio’ of Milan. G.A. Carulli issued works by conservatory teachers or former pupils at the Conservatory, such as B. Asioli, F. Frasi, G. Lovati, B. Negri, P. Perelli, A. Rolla, N. Vaccai, G. Alary, G. Bianchi, E. Cavallini, and G. Nava. He published teaching material, especially vocal and keyboard tutors, and works composed by pupils for performances at the Conservatory. He laid particular stress on organ music, publishing transcriptions and (for the first time in Italy) original compositions by musicians from abroad, such as Albrechtsberger, Pleyel, Hummel, Kalkbrenner, and Leidesdorf. Until ...

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[Castellioneus, Johannes]

( b c1484; d Milan, c1557). Italian printer . In 1504 he married a daughter of the printer Antonio Zarotto. His father, Zanotto da Castiglione, a sometime collaborator of Zarotto, printed some 90 books (1505–23), including an Ambrosian sacramentary and missal with music. Giovanni Antonio first printed in 1507, but with some regularity only from 1534. His 40-odd books include the first Milanese editions of instrumental music and part-music, printed in two impressions, with mediocre to excellent registration of the crisp and distinctive note forms, namely: Intabolatura de leuto de diversi autori (May 1536/R); Ruffo's Primo libro de motetti a cinque (June 1542); Mutetarum divinitatis liber primus, 5vv (RISM 1543³); and the Intavolatura di lauto … libro secondo of Francesco da Milano and P.P. Borrono (1548). Castiglione also printed Aaron's Compendiolo di molti dubbi (between 1545 and ...

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CBS  

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Tim Carter

(fl 1618–25). Italian printer active in Florence. Although he was printing books by December 1618, his first printed music dates from 1623 when he issued two volumes by Filippo Vitali (including Vitali’s Il secondo libro de madrigali a cinque voci). In 1625 he printed Francesca Caccini’s La liberazione di Ruggiero dall’isola d’Alcina...

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Benjamin J. Harbert

Publishing company. It was founded in 1953 by Grand Ole Opry manager Jim Denny and performer Webb Pierce. It was one of the original Nashville music publishing companies, competing with Acuff-Rose and Tree. Along with the Grand Ole Opry, these companies contributed to the initial consolidation of the country music industry. Its building was located on 7th Avenue across the street from the studio of Owen Bradley, a legendary local producer. With Bradley and an association with Decca Records, Cedarwood quickly surpassed Acuff-Rose as the premiere Nashville publishing house. Songs published under the Cedarwood name formed the repertoire of the Nashville country music industry; significant recorded works included “The Long Black Veil” by Lefty Frizzell, “So Wrong” by Patsy Cline, “Detroit City” by Bobby Bare, “Daddy Sang Bass” by Johnny Cash, and “The Comeback” by Faron Young. Other notable songwriters whose work was published by Cedarwood include Marijohn Wilkin, Buddy Holly, Danny Dill, Cindy Walker, Ronnie Self, and John D. Loudermilk. In the mid-1960s, Cedarwood began to develop its religious music catalog. Co-founder Denny died in ...

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Zdeněk Culka

[Nigrin, Nygryn, Georg]

(fl Prague, 1572–1606). Czech printer. He served his apprenticeship under Kozel, probably before 1566. Between 1572 and 1606 he published many religious, philosophical, legal, medical and astronomical books, as well as sermons, felicitations and poems; he had begun printing music by 1578. He printed a series of works by the Slovenian composer Jacob Handl, as well as music by members of the Prague royal chapel (e.g. Carl Luython and Franz Sales), Johannes Nucius and such composers as Lomnický, Mitis z Limuz, Jevíčský, Barion, Knöfel and Benedikt-Nudožerský. In both volume and quality of production, Černý was one of the foremost printers of the time.

ČSHS

J. Vanický: ‘Nigrinovy hudební tisky’ [Nigrin’s musical prints], HRo, 12 (1959), 608–9 K. Chyba: Slovník knihtiskařů v Československu od nejstarších dob do roku 1860 [Dictionary of printers in Czechoslovakia from early times to 1860] (Prague, 1966), 71 P. Danek: ‘Nototiskanská cinnost Jirího Nigrina’ [The musical prints of Nigrin], ...

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Eliot B. Levin

Italian record company. The name is an acronym for Compagnia per Edizioni, Teatro, Registrazioni ed Affini. The firm was founded in Turin in 1932 as a competitor to the Voce del Padrone/Columbia group and issued predominantly Italian opera. There was close artistic co-operation with Italian radio which provided capital and, in turn, looked for a reduction in its copyright costs. At first, pressing was put out to contract, but shortly before the war in-house facilities were acquired by buying into Fonodisco: hence the Fonit-Cetra label. The Cetra label was used in Italy and its colonies; elsewhere, marketing was by interchange of material with, especially, Parlophone. During World War II access to Parlophone ceased, to be replaced by an alliance with Polydor. After the war the Soria series was instituted, with great success, for the American market.

Leading artists include such singers as Maria Callas (her first records, issued in 1949...

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Chandos  

Paul D. Westcott

English record company. It was founded in 1979 by Brian Couzens and has championed rare and neglected repertory. Initially focussing on British composers (including Bax, Bliss, Dyson, Moeran and Rubbra), it later entered a wider field including American and European (especially Scandinavian) music. In 1989 the period performance label Chaconne was formed and in ...

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Samuel F. Pogue

revised by Frank Dobbins

(b Piedmont, c1480; d Avignon, c1539–40). French printer. He began his printing career in Lyons around 1500 as an apprentice to Jacques Arnoullet. On the latter’s death in 1504 or 1505, his widow Michelette du Cayre entrusted the press to Channey, who published a book under his own name in about 1505, using Arnoullet’s type. Assuming that he would have had to be in his mid-20s for such a responsibility, he was probably born about 1480. Another book with his name as printer was published in 1510, using his printer’s mark, a copy of the Aldine anchor and dolphin, for the first time.

Because Arnoullet’s sons were coming of age and were ready to take over their father’s business, Channey petitioned the Avignon town council in late 1512 for permission to establish a printing firm there. In August 1513 the first of many books with the Avignon address appeared in print. Michelette du Cayre followed him to Avignon, where she married him....

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W.H. Husk

revised by Margaret Cranmer, Peter Ward Jones and Kenneth R. Snell

English firm of publishers, concert agents and piano manufacturers. The firm, active in London, was started on 3 December 1810 by the pianist and composer Johann Baptist Cramer, Francis Tatton Latour and Samuel Chappell (b ?London, c1782; d London, Dec 1834), who formed a partnership. Chappell was formerly employed by the music publisher Birchall. In addition to substantial publishing activities, including educational music, the firm sold pianos from 1812, undertook concert promotion, and played a leading part in the creation of the Philharmonic Society (1813). In 1819 Cramer retired from the business; in about 1826 Latour withdrew and carried on a separate business until about 1830, when he sold it to Chappell, who was also in partnership with the instrument makers George Longman and T.C. Bates from 1829.

After Samuel Chappell’s death, the business was continued by his widow Emily Chappell and her sons. The eldest, William (...

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Chess  

Howard Rye

American record company. It was established in 1950 by brothers Leonard and Phil Chess who had bought out their partners in the Aristocrat label, founded in 1947. The new label concentrated on blues, and included recordings by Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, John Lee Hooker, Jimmy Rogers, Willie Mabon and Eddie Boyd. A sister label, Checker, began in 1952 with a similar policy, and its catalogue included Little Walter, Lowell Fulson, Sonny Boy Williamson ‘II’ and (briefly) Elmore James. Two leading African-American pioneers in the transition to rock and roll, Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley, were on Chess and Checker respectively from 1955. Some white artists were also recorded, notably Bobby Charles. The labels' doo-wop acts included the Moonglows and the Flamingos. In 1955 Argo was formed as a subsidiary label for jazz. Recordings for Chess were made by Buddy Guy, Otis Rush (both from 1960) and Koko Taylor (...

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Eric Blom

revised by Peter Ward Jones

English firm of music publishers. It was founded in Brighton by John Chester and his son William as a retail music shop in 1874, when they took over the branch office of Augener which John Chester had opened in 1860 or 1861. They established a reputation for service, and maintained both a large stock and a comprehensive lending library. In 1915 the firm was bought by Otto Marius Kling, and headquarters were set up in London, the Brighton house becoming a branch that was eventually sold. In addition to acting as agents, particularly for French and Russian publishers, the firm began its own publishing activities at this time, and soon entered into contracts not only with English composers such as Bantock, Bax, Lord Berners, Goossens and Ireland, but also with foreign composers such as Casella, Falla, Malipiero, Poulenc and Stravinsky. A small periodical, The Chesterian, was started in November 1915...