161-180 of 186 results  for:

  • Performance Venues x
Clear all

Article

Article

Charles Beare

revised by Carlo Chiesa and Duane Rosengard

Member of Stradivari family

Italian family of violin makers.

(b ? Cremona, 1644–9; d Cremona, Dec 18, 1737). Maker of violins and other instruments. Since the end of the 18th century he has been universally regarded as the greatest of all violin makers. In point of tonal excellence, design, beauty to the eye and accuracy of workmanship his instruments have never been surpassed. Stradivari inherited more than 100 years of Cremonese violin-making tradition, and upon this firmest of foundations he built his own unique career. At the peak of a working life spanning almost 70 years he brought his art to a perfection which has not been equalled. Later, at least two of his sons worked with him, but both died within a few years of their father, and thus almost the entire production of the family workshop is attributed to Antonio. In all, some 650 of his instruments survive, many of them used by the world’s leading string players....

Article

Charles Beare

revised by Carlo Chiesa and Duane Rosengard

Member of Stradivari family

(b Cremona, Feb 1, 1671; d Cremona, May 11, 1743). Violin maker , eldest son of (1) Antonio Stradivari. Although only a handful of his instruments still bear their original labels, he was nevertheless a highly important maker, though perhaps less spontaneous and confident than his father. He was his father's right-hand man for over 50 years, during which time he assisted in the building and occasionally the design of a wide variety of bowed and plucked instruments. He was perhaps responsible for the modification of the ‘forma B’ cello, about ...

Article

Charles Beare

revised by Carlo Chiesa and Duane Rosengard

Member of Stradivari family

(b Cremona, Nov 14, 1679; d Cremona, June 9, 1742). Violin maker , son of (1) Antonio Stradivari. While still a young man he travelled to Naples, perhaps in pursuit of a career outside violin making. He made violins intermittently after 1700, and a great deal of his time was taken up with social acitivities unrelated to the family workshop. The most well travelled of the Stradivari family, as a young man he spent a long period in Naples. Later in life he was on familiar terms with Tomaso Vitali, the leading violinist at Modena. Nevertheless, Omobono did build a recognizable number of violins which though not up to high artistic standards of his father and brother, are highly appreciated for their acoustic qualities....

Article

Article

Rita H. Mead

Estate in Lenox, Massachusetts, site of an international festival of music and the Tanglewood Music Center (Berkshire Music Center until 1985). The festival began in 1934 in neighbouring Interlaken as a series of open-air concerts by members of the New York PO under Henry Hadley. The Boston SO played its first Berkshire Festival concerts in ...

Article

Cathy Ragland

Theater and concert hall. The historic venue, located in the heart of San Antonio, Texas, opened to the public on 9 March 1949. It was originally built and owned by Sam Lucchese, who operated several other movie houses in the city. At the time, the 2500-seat theater was the nation’s largest to feature Spanish-language films and live entertainment. Lucchese recognized the earning potential of a business focusing on the city’s large Mexican American population. In its heyday, the Alameda featured top Mexican films often accompanied by live concerts by singing stars Pedro Infante, Lucha Reyes, and Jorge Negrete, popular comedians Cantinflas, Tin Tan, Resortes, and Piporro, such local artists as singer Rosita Fernández and Santiago Jiménez y su Conjunto, and many others. By the late 1960s, the Alameda’s popularity declined as the Mexican American population became more acculturated. It was forgotten until 1997, when the Smithsonian Institution declared the black light murals that adorned its walls a national treasure, possibly the largest existing example of a brief trend in deco theater design of the era. In ...

Article

Jonathan Spencer Jones

Article

Jonathan Spencer Jones

Article

Jonathan Spencer Jones

Article

Article

Article

Watkins Shaw

revised by John C. Phillips

An annual event, of six to eight days’ duration, substantially but not exclusively choral in character, based in turn in the cathedrals of Gloucester, Worcester and Hereford. Its precise origins are not documented. However, the Worcester Postman of 10 July 1713 records a special service at which was performed ‘Mr. Purcell’s great Te Deum, with the Symphonies and instrumental parts, on Violins and Hautboys’. Six years later, in August 1719, the same journal published a notice calling on ‘Members of the yearly Musical Assembly of these Parts … by their Subscription in September last at Gloucester … to meet at Worcester on Monday … in order to publick Performance, on the Tuesday and Wednesday following’. In 1920 official recognition was given to the year 1715 as that of the first ‘festival’, thus making the festival of 1977 the 250th festival in an annual series broken only by two world wars....

Article

Article

Article

The oldest music festival in Bulgaria and one of the oldest still in existence in Europe. It is held every year from June to July. It was adopted as a member at the European Festivals Association in 1978.

The first Varna public music celebrations were held from 23 July to 1 August 1926 on the initiative of the Varna Cultural Reading Community Centre, among others, with the support of the composers Dobri Hristov and Pancho Vladigerov and the conductor Georgi Atanasov. Between 1926 and 1931, and 1935 and 1939, the nascent festival, then known as the Summer Music Celebrations, was a week-long event. The performers, conductors, and composers featured on the first concert programme were all Bulgarian (including Dobri Hristov, Angel Bukureshtliev, and Emmanuel Manolov).

The idea for an established music summer festival first emerged in 1949, but was carried out in 1957 under the name Varna Summer Festival. In ...

Article

Article

Article

Percival Price

revised by Charles Bodman Rae

Since 1968 the official name of a bellfoundry located in Whitechapel Road, east London. The lineage of the foundry can be traced back to at least 1420. From 1570 its bells have been produced by master bellfounders of the following families: Mot (16th century); Carter, Bartlett and Clifton (17th century); Phelps, Lester, Pack, Chapman and Mears (18th century); Mears, Stainbank and Lawson (19th century); and Hughes (from 1904). From 1865 to 1968 the foundry was known as Mears & Stainbank. It has been principally engaged in making tower bells, both single and in short-range diatonic series: the latter mostly for swinging in the manner of English change-ringing, but some to be rung hanging stationary, as chimes. From the early 19th century or before, it also made musical handbells. At first these were mostly sets of 8 to 12 bells in diatonic series for practising change-ringing; but with the increasing popularity of handbell music in the 20th century (...

Article